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drgardner

Leesburg, VA, United States
  • 11
  • reviews
  • 101
  • helpful votes
  • 179
  • ratings
  • Beyond Training

  • Mastering Endurance, Health, & Life
  • By: Ben Greenfield
  • Narrated by: Ben Greenfield
  • Length: 19 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 507
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 447
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 441

Beyond Training is for men and women who have made it out of couch potato mode and are ready to take things to the next level, whether that means shedding those last few extra pounds, finishing a 5K, or even crossing the finish line of an Ironman triathlon. Everyone from the casual exerciser to the weightlifter, CrossFitter, obstacle racer, marathoner, mountaineer, triathlete, swimmer, cyclist, runner, and biohacker will glean tons of knowledge and life-changing advice from this book.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not worth the time

  • By Christopher A Stout on 03-14-16

Exhausting

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-09-18

It seems the real endurance to be mastered is the will to make it through the long, tedious tome, with its increasingly frequent infomercials and call backs to reference materials on the author’s website. Despite the massive length of the document, little is discussed in depth. Instead the listener is exhorted to review the website for full details. The techniques themselves will offer little for more pedestrian, everyday athletes. To the extent they’re realistic/workable, the material is directed more towards peak performers and professionals.

  • Letting Go

  • The Pathway of Surrender
  • By: David R. Hawkins MD. PHD.
  • Narrated by: Peter Lownds PhD
  • Length: 12 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,241
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,806
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,785

Letting Go describes a simple and effective means by which to let go of the obstacles to enlightenment and become free of negativity. During the many decades of the author's clinical psychiatric practice, the primary aim was to seek the most effective ways to relieve human suffering in all of its many forms. The inner mechanism of surrender was found to be of great practical benefit and is described in this book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Read it, practice it... and change your life

  • By ScottishLass on 07-22-15

Dangerous

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-05-16

I've tried multiple times to give this book a fair listen. I generally wade through the tedious hagiography and the debunked new age foolishness and make my way to Chapter 3, where we're informed the reason you're unhappy is that you're just not giving off the right vibe. Literally. Angry? Your fault. Sick? Your fault. Poor? Your fault. It's classic blame the victim hatefulness which can only serve to make those suffering from real pain and suffering feel worse about their condition -- it's dangerous. It's also worth noting that even if you're a believer in this foolishness, Dr. Hawkins could benefit from a rigorous copy editor. Vast swathes of the first several chapters are simply tedious, going on and on well after having established (or attempted to) a point.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Ghost Fleet

  • A Novel of the Next World War
  • By: P. W. Singer, August Cole
  • Narrated by: Rich Orlow
  • Length: 14 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,250
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,041
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,054

The year is 2026. China has taken over as the world's largest economy, while the United States, mired in an oil shortage, struggles to adjust to its diminished role. Then, a surprise attack throws the US into a chaos unseen since Pearl Harbor. As the enemy takes control, the survival of the nation will depend upon the most unlikely forces: the Navy's antiquated Ghost Fleet and a cadre of homegrown terrorists.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An unusual war story

  • By Mike From Mesa on 09-06-15

Excellent Story, Frightening Predictions

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-16

Well told action story of, possibly, the next major conflict. Characters are well developed and the story is fast-paced. What makes the book so compelling is the fact that all the technology described is real. It exists, and these are real risks we face today -- not merely the fanciful projections of an author. Singer is an excellent analyst of technology's role in war and crime, and the book doesn't disappoint in providing a fictionalized version of these facts.

  • Siddhartha's Brain

  • Unlocking the Ancient Science of Enlightenment
  • By: James Kingsland
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 10 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 154
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 126
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 124

Framed by the historical journey and teachings of the Buddha, Siddhartha's Brain shows how meditative and Buddhist practices anticipated the findings of modern neuroscience. Moving from the evolutionary history of the brain to the disorders and neuroses associated with our technology-driven world, James Kingsland explains why the ancient practice of mindfulness has been so beneficial to and so important for human beings across time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful!

  • By C. Rosky on 05-11-16

Disappointing, covered better by others

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-15-16

Acceptable for those with no familiarity with the topics, although it's all been done better before by others. Particularly disappointed in the author's unquestioning acceptance of the role of anti-depresessants in the treatment of depression. He holds them out as a panacea, relegating mindfulness to a secondary role in maintaining the "cure" the medications offer. The reality is such medications "work" on well less than half of patients, who then find themselves at greater risk of relapse after the medications have altered their brains. Individuals seeking relief from the pain of depression and mental illness would be better off skipping the "science" and going directly to the works of someone like Jack Kornfield, who is able to present helpful practices without either overt reliance on the tenets of Buddhism (which, while they would likely be helpful for some might be off-putting for the faithful of other spiritual traditions) or the baggage of the worse than useless pharmaceutical industry.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Switched On

  • A Memoir of Brain Change and Emotional Awakening
  • By: John Elder Robison, Alvaro Pascual-Leon - introduction, Marcel Just - afterword
  • Narrated by: John Elder Robison
  • Length: 11 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 112
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 101

John Elder Robison's best-selling memoir, Look Me in the Eye, is one of the most beloved accounts of life with autism. In Switched On, Robison shares the second part of his journey, pushing the boundaries of scientific discovery as he undergoes an experimental brain therapy known as TMS, or transcranial magnetic stimulation. TMS drastically changes Robison's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Transcendent Experience

  • By Gretchen SLP on 03-30-16

Frightening

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-16

While the authors story is mostly positive, he describes a frightening future in which we manipulate children's brains to "cure" them of deficiency. As has been seen with the rampant dispensing of mostly useless pharmaceuticals, psychiatrists can't be trusted with such power.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Scary Close

  • Dropping the Act and Finding True Intimacy
  • By: Donald Miller, Bob Goff
  • Narrated by: Webb Wilder
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,843
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,582
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,578

From the author of Blue Like Jazz comes a book about the risk involved in choosing to impress fewer people and connect with more, about the freedom that comes when we stop acting and start loving. It is a story about knocking down old walls to create a healthy mind, a strong family, and a satisfying career. And it all feels like a conversation with the best kind of friend: smart, funny, true, important. Scary Close is Donald Miller at his best.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding book frustrating recording

  • By Tex Warren on 03-25-15

Folksy, Religious Memoir

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-13-15

It's unfortunate I didn't notice this is categorized as a personal memoir as I could have skipped it and saved myself the time and money. The description suggests the book will deliver guidance on improving intimacy. If you're Christian and in reasonably good mental health you'll probably find the string of anecdotes heart-warming, and you can likely tease out some guidance in the author's experiences that may be applicable to your life. Otherwise, not so much -- there's little in the stereotypical stories that's relevant. Probably fine for most, but personally disappointing. (And, as others have mentioned, the editing work is annoying. No breaks, and at least a few repeated sections.)

23 of 25 people found this review helpful

  • Rewire

  • Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior
  • By: Richard O'Connor Ph.D.
  • Narrated by: Fred Stella
  • Length: 10 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,319
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,118
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,113

We humans tend to get in our own way time and time again - whether it comes to not speaking up for ourselves, going back to bad romantic partners, our umpteenth diet, or engaging in any of a range of bad habits we just can’t seem to shake. In Rewire, renowned psychotherapist Richard O’Connor, PhD, reveals why our bad habits die so hard. We have two brains - one a thoughtful, conscious, deliberative self, and the other an automatic self that does most of the work without our attention.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Meh

  • By Julie Simiskey on 12-31-14

Tired Rehash

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-15

Not very interesting or useful rehash of material already covered more originally and interestingly by others. Read Daniel Kahneman or Jack Kornfield instead.

40 of 46 people found this review helpful

  • The Antidote

  • Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking
  • By: Oliver Burkeman
  • Narrated by: Oliver Burkeman
  • Length: 6 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,113
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,875
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,868

The Antidote is a series of journeys among people who share a single, surprising way of thinking about life. What they have in common is a hunch about human psychology: that it’s our constant effort to eliminate the negative that causes us to feel so anxious, insecure, and unhappy. And that there is an alternative "negative path" to happiness and success that involves embracing the things we spend our lives trying to avoid.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Antidote explores the negative path.

  • By Bonny on 05-15-14

Finally - A Self-Help Book That Actually Helps

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-19-13

Oliver Burkeman delivers the rarest of commodities -- a self-help book that actually helps you feel better about life. Beginning with an examination of stoicism and aspects of buddhism, Burkeman proceeds to deliver often contrarian information and advice about how to deal with the inevitable setbacks and challenges life presents. Unlike most such books, which are filled with simplistic, wishful thinking, he provides practical and pragmatic advice, backed with anecdotes and solid research data.

34 of 36 people found this review helpful

  • Antifragile

  • Things That Gain from Disorder
  • By: Nassim Nicholas Taleb
  • Narrated by: Joe Ochman
  • Length: 16 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,515
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,862
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,844

In The Black Swan Taleb outlined a problem, and in Antifragile he offers a definitive solution: how to gain from disorder and chaos while being protected from fragilities and adverse events. For what Taleb calls the "antifragile" is actually beyond the robust, because it benefits from shocks, uncertainty, and stressors, just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension. The antifragile needs disorder in order to survive and flourish. Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • How to focus on impact instead of risk

  • By E. Smakman on 05-03-13

Tiresome, Angry, and Obvious

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-13

I'm willing to allow the possibility that some life-altering truth might be contained in Mr. Taleb's latest. But I'll never get to it -- at 50 minutes in, I'm throwing in the towel. In a book such as this, within an hour one might hope for some concrete discussion of the author's thesis. What we get here is little more than a screed, a polemic against academics, most of business, government -- actually, pretty much everybody except for Mr. Taleb. We're forced to endure a never-ending stream of straw man arguments and ad hominem attacks, delivered with a ceaseless contempt that is wearying -- and a bit disturbing. On this point, Mr. Ochman shines -- the author's contempt and anger are unflinchingly delivered.

The thesis that emerges -- to the extent it is allowed to -- seems to be that complex systems behave in unpredictable ways, and that efforts to micromanage said systems will inevitably, over time, produce massive failures. Conversely, left to their own devices, unfettered by the hands of bureaucrats, such dynamic systems will prove successful. Oh, and fragile things tend to be, well, fragile.

Or something.

Who do I see about getting my credit back?

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Bourne Legacy

  • By: Eric Van Lustbader
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 18 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,518
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 792
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 793

In Robert Ludlum's ground-breaking career, no other character so captured the world's imagination as Jason Bourne. He appeared in three of Robert Ludlum's own best-selling novels, his best-selling works to this day. Now, with the major motion picture adaptation of Ludlum's The Bourne Supremacy, the Ludlum estate has finally acceded to the demands of readers around the world, turning to best-selling writer Eric Van Lustbader to create a brand new Jason Bourne novel, The Bourne Legacy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • It sure reads like a Ludlum book!

  • By Linda on 07-21-04

On The Whole, A Disappointment

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-11

Scott Brick turns in a strong performance with his narration, working well with the limited material he is provided. The story itself leaves a lot to be desired - many events strain the limits of credulity, even for Jason Bourne. Not to give the ending away, but the situation the DCI finds himself in at the ending of the book seem to have come from his own fevered dreams. Perhaps the conclusion is meant as some sort of ham-fisted commentary on politics and the ability to effectively CYA. Unsatisfying.