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robert

heber, UT, United States
  • 62
  • reviews
  • 59
  • helpful votes
  • 113
  • ratings
  • Lost Connections

  • Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions
  • By: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Johann Hari
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,551
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,422
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,419

From the New York Times best-selling author of Chasing the Scream, a radically new way of thinking about depression and anxiety. What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Heartfelt, but not convincing

  • By Brett on 03-18-18

Dubious author uncovers obvious facts.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

I liked the authors previous book, chasing the scream. I would highly recommend it even though he plagiarized parts. This book falls short. He discovers the problems but falls far short of giving accurate answers. for instance;; He sites the Amish and their success, then dismisses them because they are Homophobic and " repress women" . Then predictivly he looks for a cheap and easy way to get the same results, without the same sacrifice and delayed gratification. I knew from the first chapter this was amateur hour when the author starts the book with a story about him buying an apple in Hanoi for 3 dollars. Then bring almost killed by a few bites because of the pesticides. right;) . Having been to Hanoi, and having some basic common sense, that story is b.s. or he's an absolute idiot that is ruining the market for fellow travelers. Speaking of which, at times found myself Checking the title of which book I was listening to. I'm currently slogging through an account of the long March and thought I was listening to 1950s Maoist propiganda. The author has the audacity to say things like " the westernised version doesn't actually work, where as the collectivist does". huh??? he actually sights China, Russia and Japan in this quote. In other words the American men who fought and died to free the world from tyranny were what?? selfish? Of course I get the problems with capatalism, as Milton Friedman used to say , it's a flawed system but beats the alternative. Once one acknowledges the flaws then people like Terrence Mckinna have better thoughts about the alternatives and one can sort through the rubbish. While he does give great advice in terms of recognising advertising and the benifits of psycodelics etc. the author does fall ass backwards into nuggets of wisdom. While these are good parts of the book, he can't help but fall back on the tired socialist retoric he advocates. He's obviously not quite wise enough to write this book. I mean, He can't connect simple Dots. Things like big government must rely on high taxes, which leads to long working hours for instance. American people are a different type of personality, we are naturally pioneers. Restless and innovative. Towards the end of the book he tries suggesting that everyone should be given a standard wage. Of course anyone with any sense knows government doesn't create any Wealth it just redistributes it! Who's going to provide all this easy money? Of course giving to others helps depression. Of course gardening helps, I learnt all this in Sunday school... oh yeah he's an Atheist. The author never entertains the idea that his lifestyle or lack of spiritual intelligence is contributing to his depression. I'd pass on this one.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)

  • Visionary Scientists and a Siberian Tale of Jump-Started Evolution
  • By: Lyudmila Trut, Lee Alan Dugatkin
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 7 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 300
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails and floppy ears that are as docile and friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs - they are foxes. They are the result of the most astonishing experiment in breeding ever undertaken - imagine speeding up thousands of years of evolution into a few decades. In 1959, biologists Dmitri Belyaev and Lyudmila Trut set out to do just that, by starting with a few dozen silver foxes from fox farms in the USSR and attempting to recreate the evolution of wolves into dogs in real time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome story, fantastic book!

  • By Illyria on 11-21-17

Good overall

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-18

The story is interesting and flowed well. It isn't a page turner, but one wouldn't expect it to be. There's the usual Darwinian evolution invoked, which makes perfect sense. Obviously within species it's a beautiful theory. The only complaint is with the narrator. He has a way of irritating the hell out of me. His voice is okay, I think it's his slightly melodramatic way of stating regular boring platitudes. Definitely not a bad narrator, he just doesn't do it for me.

  • We Are Soldiers Still

  • A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam
  • By: Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore (USA Ret.), Joseph L. Galloway
  • Narrated by: Joseph L. Galloway
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 79

Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway revisit their relationships with 10 American veterans of the battle, as well as Lt. Gen. Nguyen Hu An, who commanded the North Vietnamese Army troops on the other side, and two of his old company commanders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Book That is Both Timely and Eternal

  • By Terry on 04-04-09

Good For Perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

I enjoyed the book. It was engaging and informative. I have many friends in Vietnam, and have studied extensively about the war. Americans don't understand why we went to Vietnam. Given the horrors of Communism during the middle part of the 20th century we had good reason to believe Vietnam would end up like North Korea. The way the Administrations and technocrats handled the war was horrendous. As was the South Vietnamese leadership. I've come to the conclusion that the men and women on both sides who did what they were asked and were courageous should be viewed by each side as heroes. This book goes far in pursuing that idea. The most enlightening book on Vietnam and the war was written prior to our main involvment. Bernard Fall 's "Street without joy". I do feal there is some utilitarian function to war, but it should be a last resort. The authors get close to a utopian outlook that isn't reality.... They get close but don't quite go there. Worth a look

  • The Power of Myth: Programs 1-6

  • By: Joseph Campbell, Bill Moyers
  • Narrated by: Joseph Campbell, Bill Moyers
  • Length: 5 hrs and 34 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,865
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,335
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,327

An exhilarating journey into the mind and spirit of a remarkable man, a legendary teacher, and a masterful storyteller, conducted by TV journalist Bill Moyers for their acclaimed PBS series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A series that changed my life

  • By Lucas on 10-03-09

Suspend Disbelief

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

I wanted to like this. I am a huge fan of various religious beliefs and spiritual experience in general. Initially the book is good, Joseph is knowledgeable no doubt. Unfortunately the more he talks the more one realizes he not only cherry picks quotes to fit his paradigm, but his paradigm is no different from your average 5and some atheist. Poor Bill Moyers tries to Bale him out.... in fact this became almost comical. Example last chapter 47.22 mark Joseph Campbell "there is really no point or reason for life, it's just protoplasm". Bill Moyers "I disagree". Then within 5 minutes the same tired statement "God is within you, heaven is now.... well if there's no reason for us to be here and this is the end result then life is meaningless. Most religion throughout time is very similar, you can see metaphor used and tie it in with a dozen other similar beliefs and get a good idea what's going on. Not with this. His thinking is much closer to postmodernism than any ancient teachings. To him "Charles Manson followed his bliss". There are far better books out there. The neuro surgeon (name escapes me) that had a profound NDE wrote two books which have more profound truth in 5 minutes than Poor old Joseph Campbell found his whole life. His profound spiritual experience was when he "knew he was going to win a race in college". I'm sorry but When you are in tune this is a common occurrence. There's so much more!! Ultimately I'm sorry to say that I think he was an intellectual who liked hearing himself talk. A fraud basically.

  • The Next Pandemic

  • On the Front Lines Against Humankind's Gravest Dangers
  • By: Ali Khan, William Patrick
  • Narrated by: Ben Sullivan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 303
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 279
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 278

An inside account of the fight to contain the world's deadliest diseases - and the panic and corruption that make them worse. The Next Pandemic is a firsthand account of disasters like anthrax, bird flu, and others - and how we could do more to prevent their return. It is both a gripping story of our brushes with fate and an urgent lesson on how we can keep ourselves safe from the inevitable next pandemic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Many Outstanding Stories about Many Scary Microbes

  • By aaron on 01-24-17

A real page turner ?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

The book gives a 2000 ft view / history of the authors travels to different parts of the globe dealing with different outbreaks. The author describes such inovative ideas as " the next pandemic is only a 32 hour flight away", " climate change is leading to more disease, or "don't use antibiotics for the common cold or a sore throat unless it's strep" etc.. if those ideas gun your engine this books for you. The book is basic stuff, nothing new. Another problem is the politics of the author. Anyone who spends a career sucking off the government teat will have a big government bent. I get it, I expect it but he was just a bit to nauseating. When he talks about going out and into remote villages and helping the tribes set goals etc. I'm thinking, these guys are intuitive people, they aren't desk Jockeys. Hell show them a picture of Guinea worm, give them the filter and get the hell out. They are smart people they understand, they don't need big brother helping them " set goals" and do spread sheets. There are interesting parts of the book. The author has lived with this and traveled far and wide. He's at his best when discussing ebola and flu shots. Unfortunately when he discusses things outside of his expertise, it sounds like a totally different voice. It's ridiculous in some parts , which makes me wonder if the editor wrote them. I say that because things like ( to paraphrase)" the average person in New Orleans only makes 15k a year and many can't afford a tv". I lived in New Orleans east in the 90s where I lived was as poor as New Orleans gets outside of the projects. I can tell you every person had a tv. Every one, and we all knew it was going to flood someday. It was a calculated risk. Many of those who stayed were waiting for the monthly welfare checks. New Orleans was a failure of (the French for building below sea level obviously but really) individuals first , local government second, state government third and Federal government last. The governor must ask for assistance . He makes the statement "individuals feel like their government should protect them" in the context that we need more, bigger and better government. That was a fundamental problem there and why so many died! Take some self responsibility. He also claims that " after Katrina that will never happen again". There's no way he wrote this stuff.. Not someone who's traveled and read history. I also couldn't help thinking about the ban on DDT and the hundreds of millions of lives of Black African children resulting from that "political" decision. The science worked, they had a 2 week hearing and every scientist was against the ban since " not 1 person has died from it". But the Nixon administration was fearful of overpopulation "to many poor blacks in Africa". Maleria wasn't mentioned much In the book. That was our gift to Africa, "we eliminated Maleria in the US with DDT but now you can't use it or you can't get "charity" from us ". I got this on the daily deal so 2.5 stars for what I paid. Richard Preston is infinitely more enjoyable. His stuff is page turning and you'll have no idea where he falls politically when your finished.

4 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Who Killed Homer?

  • The Demise of Classical Education and the Recovery of Greek Wisdom
  • By: Victor Davis Hanson, John Heath
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 11 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75

For over two millennia in the West, familiarity with the literature, philosophy, and values of the Classical World has been synonymous with education itself. The traditions of the Greeks explain why Western Culture’s unique tenets of democracy, capitalism, civil liberty, and constitutional government are now sweeping the globe. Yet the general public in America knows less about its cultural origins than ever before, as Classical education rapidly disappears from our high school and university curricula.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Required reading

  • By Sotiris on 07-28-15

"Intuitive and enlightening"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-18

VDH abd Heath do a good job of describing the wisdom of the Greeks and why we're not studying them like generations past. Specifically why the very educators hired to teach the classics have failed. There is also blame directed at parents and culture in general. The authors also suggest a list of common sense solutions for educators. I found this book interesting but also VERY entertaining. If you are a fan of postmodernism, this book will turn your stomach or correct you. If you are a mediocre college professor or academic middle manager who prefers conferences to the classroom, you will also be enlightened. You have been warned.

  • This Is Your Brain on Parasites

  • How Tiny Creatures Manipulate Our Behavior and Shape Society
  • By: Kathleen McAuliffe
  • Narrated by: Nicol Zanzarella
  • Length: 8 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 640
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 586
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 587

A riveting investigation of the myriad ways that parasites control how other creatures - including humans - think, feel, and act. These tiny organisms can live only inside another animal, and, as McAuliffe reveals, they have many evolutionary motives for manipulating their host's behavior. Far more often than appreciated, these puppeteers orchestrate the interplay between predator and prey.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A parasitologist view of the world

  • By Colin Mc on 10-25-16

Pleasant summary

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

This was a nice summary of parasites, microorganisms and other interesting titbits. Some have complained about the statements not being verified by enough science. The author gives the facts as they appear from the limited observations. She makes it clear there is much more to say on the issue. I found the weakest parts of the book when she frames everything in an evolutionary framework. This is a weakeness with nearly all similar contemporary works. The fact that ancient religions seemingly instantly hit upon the best ways to avoid contagion through unintuitive practices, should give the know it all evolutionary biologists pause. It seems obvious that "eating of this fruit (containing microorganisms) will make you wise" could be more than a cute metaphor . So when she restates the tired X did this Because of evolution i find it lacking. At this point who knows why things became the way they are??? Continuing scientific research is needed, but everything seen and also things unseen should be put on the table . This book furthers the dialogue. The disgust chapter was nice, although I question some of that data. Your average Alaska resident is very conservative, yet seems less bothered by blood and guts than your average New York liberal. I mean they kill and gut much of their own food. The moderator was good, she had a nice pleasant voice. There were a couple misread words, moral instead of mortal. No biggie.

  • Sh*tshow!

  • The Country's Collapsing . . . and the Ratings Are Great
  • By: Charlie LeDuff
  • Narrated by: Charlie LeDuff
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 164
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 162

A daring, firsthand, and utterly-unscripted account of crisis in America, from Ferguson to Flint to Cliven Bundy's ranch to Donald Trump's unstoppable campaign for President - at every turn, Pulitzer-prize winner and best-selling author of Detroit: An American Autopsy, Charlie LeDuff was there.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Examinations of the aftermath from the scene

  • By josh on 05-23-18

Empty calories

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-18

Chuck does a good job of making the mundane be slightly less so. Unfortunately like a contemporary Hollywood movie, it lacks anything of substance. One can't speak about contemporary "news" and politics without being somewhat boring.... but he does as good a job as any. I found "Detroit an autopsy" a much more interesting listen. There are no new stories, just retelling of old stories. The modern reiteration of these is more flash over substance. More character development of unique characters is needed for 5 stars. Of course with the exception of recent military history it's becoming rare to find much character in individuals. Narration is fine, a bit over the top, but it matches the story.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Bad Blood

  • Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup
  • By: John Carreyrou
  • Narrated by: Will Damron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 5,041
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,585
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 4,572

In 2014, Theranos founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes was widely seen as the female Steve Jobs: a brilliant Stanford dropout whose startup "unicorn" promised to revolutionize the medical industry with a machine that would make blood testing significantly faster and easier. Backed by investors such as Larry Ellison and Tim Draper, Theranos sold shares in a fundraising round that valued the company at more than $9 billion, putting Holmes' worth at an estimated $4.7 billion. There was just one problem: The technology didn't work.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Outstanding and the definitive words on Theranos.

  • By Kenneth on 05-30-18

Page tuener

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-31-18

The author does a great job of chronicling a sociopathic wannabe. A strong woman who immitating strong men to get ahead. At a time when women and men are stumbling over themselves to exalt diversity above merrit, this book brings home the reality of this self imposed wishful thinking. I would have liked the book to go Into the postmodern neurotic culture that enabled this. I found myself drawn into the similarities of different eras when sociopaths with noble dreams bamboozle their way to power. Ironically the most bamboozled were old white men on the right.. which serves them right. Of course Hillary Clinton makes an appearance as is her nature whenever corruption is in play . . The 70s culture enabled many in the bay area to Jim Jones, this postmodern climate enabled Harvey Weinstein, Elizabeth Holmes and their common thug lawyer. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in studying despot leaders. I remember seeing this lady on an interview and my gut instinct was she's batshit crazy look at those eyes. I wondered how she knew how to create mechanical mechanisms to accomplish this seeming holy grail. Then my internal critic chastised me. I wanted to believe what she was saying because it appealed to the disruption of the bloated health care industry. I realise now that individuals like her project what you want to hear. The lawyers come off real bad. So does the thug "sunny" she's living with. I swear I've seen this guy at that Indian restaurant near that woodfired pizza joint across from the skanky strip club on el cameno real in the Mexican neighbourhood just outside of Atherton CA. but I digress... get the book!

  • Wait, What?

  • And Life's Other Essential Questions
  • By: James E. Ryan
  • Narrated by: James E. Ryan
  • Length: 2 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,438
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,309
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,307

In his commencement address to the graduating class of 2016, James E. Ryan, dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Education, offered remarkable advice to the crowd of hopeful men and women eager to make their marks on the world. The key to achieving emotional connections and social progress, he told them, can be found in five essential questions.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • This Author and Book Rambles On and On and On ...

  • By J Littlejohn on 06-23-18

Alright

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-18

I purchased this as the daily special. It cost 99cents and was easily worth $1.50. It has a feel good pop psychology quality to it. I found the advice decent but not ground breaking. The best part of this book is the way the author breaks down a few solid pieces of advice into a few questions. That makes them easier to remember. There's a part of the book that in my opinion is borderline poor advice. The section when he regrets not hounding the doctors to expend more money to squeeze a few more months out of his mother's life. " couldn't we do more"..... to paraphrase "I would have at least felt better". Sorry but that attitude is one of the biggest problems with health care. It's dangerous as is the phrase "the attempt is often more important than the result". These are the ethos that seeded every failed socialist society abroad and program abroad. Otherwise an ok little book. .99 yes, $1.50 yes, $14 pure hubris