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robert

heber, UT, United States
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  • 13 Hours

  • The Inside Account of What Really Happened in Benghazi
  • By: Mitchell Zuckoff, Annex Security Team
  • Narrated by: Mitchell Zuckoff
  • Length: 7 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,958
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,036
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,002

13 Hours presents, for the first time ever, the true account of the events of September 11, 2012, when terrorists attacked the US State Department Special Mission Compound and a nearby CIA station called the Annex in Benghazi, Libya. A team of six American security operators fought to repel the attackers and protect the Americans stationed there. Those men went beyond the call of duty, performing extraordinary acts of courage and heroism, to avert tragedy on a much larger scale.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Listened to it THREE TIMES

  • By LTC R. on 04-14-16

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-13-18

This account is pretty straight forward. It doesn't sugar coat the facts that led up to and transpired on 9/11 2012. The interesting thing about the situation is how Former Marines, Navy Seals, an army Ranger and even a few non military personnel all worked together . Unfortunately the spooks and state department didn't rise to the occasion. When everything is run top down, teleprompter style, the men on the ground suffer . I felt like I got to know the characters and could see the action in my mind's eye. There were no slow parts, yet it didn't feel sensationalized. The Hero's rose to the occasion and some gave all. Others withered and hid. It's fascinating to see what motivates people and how they respond to tradgety and dangerous situations. I highly recommend this book.

  • The Final Mission of Extortion 17

  • Special Ops, Helicopter Support, SEAL Team Six, and the Deadliest Day of the US War in Afghanistan
  • By: Ed Darack
  • Narrated by: John Pruden
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 308
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 284
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 283

The downing of Extortion 17 spurred a number of conspiracy theories, such as the idea that the shootdown was revenge for bin Laden's death. In The Final Mission of Extortion 17, Ed Darack debunks this theory and others and uncovers the truth behind this mysterious tragedy. His account of the brave pilots, crew, and passengers of Extortion 17 and the events of that fateful day is interwoven into a rich, complex narrative that also discusses modern joint combat operations and the history of the Afghan war to that date.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great piece of literary work

  • By DPI on 02-07-18

Fanciful account

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

I was truly disappointed with this account. To put this tradgety in perspective let's think of a football stadium full of military personnel. Where we create a competition to find the most talented couple dozen. Take those few and spend several million training and perfecting their skills. Let them leave their families and prove themselves in combat for several years. Then take these few elite men and put them in a big hulking helicopter and try to insert them into a small vulnerable area in a confirmed hot zone. This in order to chase a few unknown runners. If this were a movie you'd immediately suspect a set up. We'll never know?? I'll trust the pilots were component. We know the Seals and those assigned to seal teams and the PJ's were the best of the best. And now they're gone!! This mission was at best Ill concieved at worst a set up. I'm not a conspiracy theorist but the facts don't look good. "black box washed away" sure.. This book falls short of convincing me of anything. I'd like to of heard about Jason Workman and the other seals an PJ's. They were the most fascinating, interesting part of this tragic episode and they're barely mentioned. Obama put these men in the cross hairs for political expediency. The others who planned this mission, needed to be held responsible. The author didn't do justice to the story.. There's not even a hint of the glaring problems in this milk toast account. For more info in 1/1000 the time of this book, I'd recommend reading
https://m.washingtontimes.com/news/2013/oct/20/families-suspect-seal-team-6-crash-was-inside-job-/

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Amusing Ourselves to Death

  • Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business
  • By: Neil Postman
  • Narrated by: Jeff Riggenbach
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 713
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 567
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 556

In this eloquent and persuasive book, Neil Postman examines the deep and broad effects of television culture on the manner in which we conduct our public affairs, and how "entertainment values" have corrupted the very way we think. As politics, news, religion, education, and commerce are given less and less expression in the form of the printed word, they are rapidly being reshaped to suit the requirements of television.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent Content Read at Warp Speed

  • By chaoticmuse on 03-17-11

Timeless wisdom

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-05-18

I heard about this book from Hamilton Morris who mentioned it on the Joe Rogan podcast. This book is timeless. With withering accuracy, this book describes the downside of media, tv and computer culture. Unfortunately those who most need to hear this message , most likely wouldn't have the attention span or desire to hear it. I was impressed by the unapologetic approach. The author isn't political. He also isn't politically correct. So refreshing! I strongly disagree with an other review. The one in which it's alleged that this material is dated. It's more applicable today than when it was written. One only need substitute smart phone along with TV. I especially appreciated the chapter on News. I stopped watching 6 years ago and haven't looked back. I'm on my 3rd listen. Get this book!!!

  • The Coming Storm

  • By: Michael Lewis
  • Narrated by: Michael Lewis
  • Length: 2 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,323
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,195
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,151

Tornadoes, cyclones, tsunamis… Weather can be deadly – especially when it strikes without warning. Millions of Americans could soon find themselves at the mercy of violent weather if the public data behind lifesaving storm alerts gets privatized for personal gain. In his first Audible Original feature, New York Times best-selling author and journalist Michael Lewis delivers hard-hitting research on not-so-random weather data – and how Washington plans to release it. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Why you shouldn't ignore the weather forecast

  • By Elisabeth Carey on 09-10-18

Snoozer

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-01-18

The book was free, unfortunately it wasn't worth the time. If Lewis were a musician I'm sure in 20 years he'd call this a throw away book. He wants us to believe big data... (government data) will fix all our problems. Unfortunately (like in baseball ) the opposite seems to be the case. People are getting dumber because of technology ... thanks in large part to the silicon valley data collectors. ... Who he implies are going to save us from ourselves... The book lacks consistency. For instance He belittles behavioral economics, then turns around and spends 20 minutes telling you about some government intern, who, given enough time and money will figure out why people don't take cover during a storm. UGH. The one word Michael Lewis doesn't seem to understand is intuition. I'll take an old intuitive farmer who knows the land, over a silicon valley geek working for Monsanto . Who flies in and wants to sell me insurance based on his Data.. ...

  • The Theater of War

  • What Ancient Greek Tragedies Can Teach Us Today
  • By: Bryan Doerries
  • Narrated by: Adam Driver
  • Length: 5 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 292
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 275
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 273

This compassionate, personal, and illuminating work of nonfiction draws on the author's celebrated work as a director of socially conscious theater to connect listeners with the power of an ancient artistic tradition. For years Bryan Doerries has been producing ancient tragedies for current and returned servicemen and women, addicts, tornado and hurricane victims, and a wide range of other at-risk people in society.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Breathtaking

  • By Emily Willis on 01-05-18

I wanted to like it

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-18

This book isn't worth a credit. While It did have some interesting stories. It could have been so much better. I will confess that when the author started dropping quotes from Michel Foucault he lost all credibility. I also got sick of hearing about the girlfriend. Maybe that's just me, but it didn't keep my attention. The strongest parts of the book were where the author describes the plays. Unfortunately this wasn't enough. I applaud the author for keeping the Greeks alive.... but anyone who would drop a Michel Foucault quote in a book about the Greeks, has lost all credibility. It would be like dropping a Madonna quote in a book about the stoics.

  • Lost Connections

  • Uncovering the Real Causes of Depression - and the Unexpected Solutions
  • By: Johann Hari
  • Narrated by: Johann Hari
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,035
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,869
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,863

From the New York Times best-selling author of Chasing the Scream, a radically new way of thinking about depression and anxiety. What really causes depression and anxiety - and how can we really solve them?

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Are we turning the corner....

  • By jaga on 06-07-18

Dubious author uncovers obvious facts.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

I liked the authors previous book, chasing the scream. I would highly recommend it even though he plagiarized parts. This book falls short. He discovers the problems but falls far short of giving accurate answers. for instance;; He sites the Amish and their success, then dismisses them because they are Homophobic and " repress women" . Then predictivly he looks for a cheap and easy way to get the same results, without the same sacrifice and delayed gratification. I knew from the first chapter this was amateur hour when the author starts the book with a story about him buying an apple in Hanoi for 3 dollars. Then bring almost killed by a few bites because of the pesticides. right;) . Having been to Hanoi, and having some basic common sense, that story is b.s. or he's an absolute idiot that is ruining the market for fellow travelers. Speaking of which, at times found myself Checking the title of which book I was listening to. I'm currently slogging through an account of the long March and thought I was listening to 1950s Maoist propiganda. The author has the audacity to say things like " the westernised version doesn't actually work, where as the collectivist does". huh??? he actually sights China, Russia and Japan in this quote. In other words the American men who fought and died to free the world from tyranny were what?? selfish? Of course I get the problems with capatalism, as Milton Friedman used to say , it's a flawed system but beats the alternative. Once one acknowledges the flaws then people like Terrence Mckinna have better thoughts about the alternatives and one can sort through the rubbish. While he does give great advice in terms of recognising advertising and the benifits of psycodelics etc. the author does fall ass backwards into nuggets of wisdom. While these are good parts of the book, he can't help but fall back on the tired socialist retoric he advocates. He's obviously not quite wise enough to write this book. I mean, He can't connect simple Dots. Things like big government must rely on high taxes, which leads to long working hours for instance. American people are a different type of personality, we are naturally pioneers. Restless and innovative. Towards the end of the book he tries suggesting that everyone should be given a standard wage. Of course anyone with any sense knows government doesn't create any Wealth it just redistributes it! Who's going to provide all this easy money? Of course giving to others helps depression. Of course gardening helps, I learnt all this in Sunday school... oh yeah he's an Atheist. The author never entertains the idea that his lifestyle or lack of spiritual intelligence is contributing to his depression. I'd pass on this one.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)

  • Visionary Scientists and a Siberian Tale of Jump-Started Evolution
  • By: Lyudmila Trut, Lee Alan Dugatkin
  • Narrated by: Joe Hempel
  • Length: 7 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 418
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 387
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 388

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails and floppy ears that are as docile and friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs - they are foxes. They are the result of the most astonishing experiment in breeding ever undertaken - imagine speeding up thousands of years of evolution into a few decades. In 1959, biologists Dmitri Belyaev and Lyudmila Trut set out to do just that, by starting with a few dozen silver foxes from fox farms in the USSR and attempting to recreate the evolution of wolves into dogs in real time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awesome story, fantastic book!

  • By Illyria on 11-21-17

Good overall

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-18

The story is interesting and flowed well. It isn't a page turner, but one wouldn't expect it to be. There's the usual Darwinian evolution invoked, which makes perfect sense. Obviously within species it's a beautiful theory. The only complaint is with the narrator. He has a way of irritating the hell out of me. His voice is okay, I think it's his slightly melodramatic way of stating regular boring platitudes. Definitely not a bad narrator, he just doesn't do it for me.

  • We Are Soldiers Still

  • A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam
  • By: Lt. Gen. Harold G. Moore (USA Ret.), Joseph L. Galloway
  • Narrated by: Joseph L. Galloway
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85

Harold G. Moore and Joseph L. Galloway revisit their relationships with 10 American veterans of the battle, as well as Lt. Gen. Nguyen Hu An, who commanded the North Vietnamese Army troops on the other side, and two of his old company commanders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Book That is Both Timely and Eternal

  • By Terry on 04-04-09

Good For Perspective

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-21-18

I enjoyed the book. It was engaging and informative. I have many friends in Vietnam, and have studied extensively about the war. Americans don't understand why we went to Vietnam. Given the horrors of Communism during the middle part of the 20th century we had good reason to believe Vietnam would end up like North Korea. The way the Administrations and technocrats handled the war was horrendous. As was the South Vietnamese leadership. I've come to the conclusion that the men and women on both sides who did what they were asked and were courageous should be viewed by each side as heroes. This book goes far in pursuing that idea. The most enlightening book on Vietnam and the war was written prior to our main involvment. Bernard Fall 's "Street without joy". I do feal there is some utilitarian function to war, but it should be a last resort. The authors get close to a utopian outlook that isn't reality.... They get close but don't quite go there. Worth a look

  • The Power of Myth: Programs 1-6

  • By: Joseph Campbell, Bill Moyers
  • Narrated by: Joseph Campbell, Bill Moyers
  • Length: 5 hrs and 34 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,985
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,440
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,433

An exhilarating journey into the mind and spirit of a remarkable man, a legendary teacher, and a masterful storyteller, conducted by TV journalist Bill Moyers for their acclaimed PBS series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A series that changed my life

  • By Lucas on 10-03-09

Suspend Disbelief

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

I wanted to like this. I am a huge fan of various religious beliefs and spiritual experience in general. Initially the book is good, Joseph is knowledgeable no doubt. Unfortunately the more he talks the more one realizes he not only cherry picks quotes to fit his paradigm, but his paradigm is no different from your average 5and some atheist. Poor Bill Moyers tries to Bale him out.... in fact this became almost comical. Example last chapter 47.22 mark Joseph Campbell "there is really no point or reason for life, it's just protoplasm". Bill Moyers "I disagree". Then within 5 minutes the same tired statement "God is within you, heaven is now.... well if there's no reason for us to be here and this is the end result then life is meaningless. Most religion throughout time is very similar, you can see metaphor used and tie it in with a dozen other similar beliefs and get a good idea what's going on. Not with this. His thinking is much closer to postmodernism than any ancient teachings. To him "Charles Manson followed his bliss". There are far better books out there. The neuro surgeon (name escapes me) that had a profound NDE wrote two books which have more profound truth in 5 minutes than Poor old Joseph Campbell found his whole life. His profound spiritual experience was when he "knew he was going to win a race in college". I'm sorry but When you are in tune this is a common occurrence. There's so much more!! Ultimately I'm sorry to say that I think he was an intellectual who liked hearing himself talk. A fraud basically.

  • The Next Pandemic

  • On the Front Lines Against Humankind's Gravest Dangers
  • By: Ali Khan, William Patrick
  • Narrated by: Ben Sullivan
  • Length: 8 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 334

An inside account of the fight to contain the world's deadliest diseases - and the panic and corruption that make them worse. The Next Pandemic is a firsthand account of disasters like anthrax, bird flu, and others - and how we could do more to prevent their return. It is both a gripping story of our brushes with fate and an urgent lesson on how we can keep ourselves safe from the inevitable next pandemic.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Many Outstanding Stories about Many Scary Microbes

  • By aaron on 01-24-17

A real page turner ?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-20-18

The book gives a 2000 ft view / history of the authors travels to different parts of the globe dealing with different outbreaks. The author describes such inovative ideas as " the next pandemic is only a 32 hour flight away", " climate change is leading to more disease, or "don't use antibiotics for the common cold or a sore throat unless it's strep" etc.. if those ideas gun your engine this books for you. The book is basic stuff, nothing new. Another problem is the politics of the author. Anyone who spends a career sucking off the government teat will have a big government bent. I get it, I expect it but he was just a bit to nauseating. When he talks about going out and into remote villages and helping the tribes set goals etc. I'm thinking, these guys are intuitive people, they aren't desk Jockeys. Hell show them a picture of Guinea worm, give them the filter and get the hell out. They are smart people they understand, they don't need big brother helping them " set goals" and do spread sheets. There are interesting parts of the book. The author has lived with this and traveled far and wide. He's at his best when discussing ebola and flu shots. Unfortunately when he discusses things outside of his expertise, it sounds like a totally different voice. It's ridiculous in some parts , which makes me wonder if the editor wrote them. I say that because things like ( to paraphrase)" the average person in New Orleans only makes 15k a year and many can't afford a tv". I lived in New Orleans east in the 90s where I lived was as poor as New Orleans gets outside of the projects. I can tell you every person had a tv. Every one, and we all knew it was going to flood someday. It was a calculated risk. Many of those who stayed were waiting for the monthly welfare checks. New Orleans was a failure of (the French for building below sea level obviously but really) individuals first , local government second, state government third and Federal government last. The governor must ask for assistance . He makes the statement "individuals feel like their government should protect them" in the context that we need more, bigger and better government. That was a fundamental problem there and why so many died! Take some self responsibility. He also claims that " after Katrina that will never happen again". There's no way he wrote this stuff.. Not someone who's traveled and read history. I also couldn't help thinking about the ban on DDT and the hundreds of millions of lives of Black African children resulting from that "political" decision. The science worked, they had a 2 week hearing and every scientist was against the ban since " not 1 person has died from it". But the Nixon administration was fearful of overpopulation "to many poor blacks in Africa". Maleria wasn't mentioned much In the book. That was our gift to Africa, "we eliminated Maleria in the US with DDT but now you can't use it or you can't get "charity" from us ". I got this on the daily deal so 2.5 stars for what I paid. Richard Preston is infinitely more enjoyable. His stuff is page turning and you'll have no idea where he falls politically when your finished.

5 of 8 people found this review helpful