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TJ Fitz

CA United States
  • 15
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 15
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  • The Code: A Man's Rules for Living Life, Having Fun, and Getting Dressed

  • By: Carolyn Strauss, Jack Dale
  • Narrated by: Jack Dale, Carolyn Strauss
  • Length: 2 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

In the current cultural narrative of rules for behavior and interaction, The Code is a refreshing examination of the guidelines that can keep young men from making mistakes. Even when the consequences of those mistakes may not become relevant or public for years. The Code is an indispensable collection of honorable rules to live by. Boys will listen and learn from it. "Guys" should be guided by these rules to become men. Men should give it as gifts to those who can still use a little extra help. Women should listen to it to see the world through a man's eyes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Common sense for future Manly Men

  • By cosmitron on 04-11-18

Worth A Listen

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

This book was certainly worth a listen. I always enjoy hearing the "code" by which others live their lives. I, of course, did not 100% agree with everything laid out in this book, but at the author states, that's totally fine. This book is not meant to be a "live your life this way", but instead a "here's how I live my life based on the lessons I've learned; take away what you want". I wasn't a fan of Carolyn's additions (which is why I only gave "Story" three stars), because I thought she was repetitive, and just there to hype up Jack's code by praising it. But I didn't let that detract from the rest of the book.

As a 26 year old, I've had my own share of experiences, sure, and have developed my own "code" so far, but I definitely picked up a few things from this book. Some were things that I agreed with Jack on, and some were based on vehement disagreements. In both cases, this book still helped me adjust my "code". Even if you think you know exactly what your own "code" is, I would say it's worth checking out Jack's opinions.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • The Metamorphosis

  • By: Franz Kafka
  • Narrated by: Don Amodio
  • Length: 2 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6

The Metamorphosis is a novella written by Franz Kafka that was first published in 1915.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A complex classic story.

  • By cosmitron on 04-11-18

Forgot How Much I Liked This Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

I read this classic back in high school, and remembered liking it. After listening to it again, I remembered why. It's a great short story that is really quite creative. It has some deeper meanings (if you like assigning deep meanings to things), or you can simply enjoy it as a story. Franz does a good job of conveying the emotions and oddities of such an odd situation for Gregor. If you enjoy stories that are unlike other stories you have heard, then I would recommend this book. I found the narrator to be a good fit for the book as well.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • Simulation Theory Explained: Are We Living in a Simulation?

  • By: Austin Waters
  • Narrated by: Ron Welch
  • Length: 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 13
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 14

Simulated reality is the hypothesis that reality could be simulated - for example by quantum computer simulation - to a degree indistinguishable from "true" reality. It could contain conscious minds which may or may not be fully aware that they are living inside a simulation. This is quite different from the current, technologically achievable concept of virtual reality. Virtual reality is easily distinguished from the experience of actuality; participants are never in doubt about the nature of what they experience.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Are you real ?

  • By cosmitron on 05-01-18

Too "Culty" For Me

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

I was not a fan of this book. I thought it would be an informational piece on what simulation theory is. But, as I found out after listening, you're better off just reading the Wikipedia page. Literally, the intro to the Wikipedia page IS the description for this book... The arguments in this book were, for the most part, flawed at best. They can be summarized as follows: There are patterns in nature, and elements in life that are sort of like simulations that we run; therefore, our lives must be a simulation.

To me, that's a chicken or the egg argument. The author compared two things, and just chose which came first. Many of the other "points" and "evidence" were just ramblings and random thoughts. At one point, the author snuck in a statement that these were only "suggested evidence", then kept on going.

It got a bit cult-like when the author stated that since there are no good new creations now, that we must be near the end of time, and that our existence will be soon coming to an abrupt end. "But do not worry, it is going to be better". That, followed by "life means continuity, and death is not the end, just an exit from this world...". At this point I realized I was not a fan of the reader either. Up until that point I was not bothered (I listened to the sample, and didn't mind it then).

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • West Cork

  • By: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Narrated by: Sam Bungey, Jennifer Forde
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24,352
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,766
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 21,769

This much we do know: Sophie Toscan du Plantier was murdered days before Christmas in 1996, her broken body discovered at the edge of her property near the town of Schull in West Cork, Ireland. The rest remains a mystery. Gripping, yet ever elusive, join the real-life hunt for answers in the year’s first not-to-be-missed, true-crime series.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • ENTERTAINING AND THOUGHT-PROVOKING

  • By Ann on 02-13-18

Intriguing Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

I sort of got the same vibe from this as I got from "Serial", but I liked this much more. I found the story in West Cork to be quite compelling. It was a bit tricky at first to get my mind in the zone to understand the accents, and some of the volumes were a bit low, but nevertheless I found it difficult to turn the book off. Sam and Jennifer did a great job of laying out the story; I like the order they told it in. They didn't just blurt out all the facts right away, and they didn't give a perfectly chronological tell of events either. They fed out the information so as to really paint an unbiased account of what happened. They never took anyone's side, and really examined each piece for what it was, and nothing more.

If you're looking for a good, real-life mystery to learn more about, then I would recommend this series.

  • Bill Gates

  • A Biography of the Microsoft Billionaire
  • By: Nate Stevens
  • Narrated by: Nate Sjol
  • Length: 1 hr and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 25

In 1975, Bill Gates and Paul Allen launched Microsoft, which became the world's largest PC software company. American business magnate, investor, author, philanthropist, humanitarian, and principal founder of Microsoft Corporation, Gates is one of the best-known entrepreneurs of the personal computer revolution. Discover more about this multifaceted man behind Microsoft. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A good overview of iconic Tech leader.

  • By cosmitron on 05-23-18

Absolutely a Great Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-18

This audio book was awesome. I was skeptical that an hour would be enough time, but I learned quite a bit about Bill! It hit all the major points, while still providing enough information to give a coherent story on his background. There were also some neat facts scattered around in there, like where the name "XBox" came from.

If you have even a fleeting curiosity of who Bill Gates is or how he got to where he is today, I would certainly recommend this book.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Great Book of Texas: The Crazy History of Texas with Amazing Random Facts & Trivia

  • A Trivia Nerds Guide to the History of the United States 1
  • By: Bill O'Neill
  • Narrated by: Derek Newman
  • Length: 3 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17

Are you looking to learn more about Texas? Sure, you’ve heard about the Alamo and JFK’s assassination in history class, but there’s so much about the Lone Star State that even natives don’t know about. In this trivia audiobook, you’ll journey through Texas’s history, pop culture, sports, folklore, and so much more!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Texas size trivia fun.

  • By cosmitron on 04-12-18

Lots of Good Trivia Knowledge

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-18

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

Overall I found this book very interesting. I came out with many more tidbits of knowledge on Texas. Most of the facts were interesting and entertaining. Since this was more of a "here's all the cool stuff on Texas" than it was a "read in this order story", you can easily skip facts that you are not interested in. For example, I skipped the section on famous Texan celebrities, because that's not my cup of tea. But skipping that section did not detract at all from my experience. Additionally, since it took me a few commutes to finish, I found myself going back to some of the sections I enjoyed more. And I plan on revisiting some sections in the future as well.
It's also nice because you can bookmark all the fun facts that stand out to you. I'd list some of my favorite facts, but I don't want to spoil any for potential readers. I set a few bookmarks so I can brush up on the ones I found most interesting; I feel like at least 3 or 4 of these facts will come up in pub trivia for me at some point.

I would say that I would recommend this book to anyone who loves trivia, anyone who lives in Texas, or anyone who is moving to Texas.

  • The Call of the Wild

  • By: Jack London
  • Narrated by: Stephen Paul Aulridge Jr.
  • Length: 3 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23

The Call of the Wild is a short adventure novel by Jack London published in 1903 and set in Yukon, Canada during the 1890s Klondike Gold Rush, when strong sled dogs were in high demand. The central character of the novel is a dog named Buck. The story opens at a ranch in Santa Clara Valley, California, when Buck is stolen from his home and sold into service as a sled dog in Alaska. He becomes progressively feral in the harsh environment, where he is forced to fight to survive and dominate other dogs. By the end, he sheds the veneer of civilization, and relies on primordial instinct and learned experience to emerge as a leader in the wild.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An inspiration for Dogs and Humans.

  • By cosmitron on 04-11-18

An Entertaining Classic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

Would you listen to The Call of the Wild again? Why?

Probably not. Since I know the whole story now, it would be less exciting to listen to again. I don't think I enjoyed it enough to repeat it. That said, it was a great listen the first time, so I would still recommend it to others if you haven't read/listened to it already.

What other book might you compare The Call of the Wild to and why?

I don't have a good comparison book... But it would compare with any book with a story whose main character goes through great growth, and transforms from just good/content to truly great and legendary.

Which scene was your favorite?

I really liked the scene where he met John Thorton. I enjoyed the poetic justice, and I felt like John was a man that Buck deserved. I also predicted what was going to happen, and it was really great to see it work out like that.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Nope. It was longer than my hour long commute, so it took multiple sittings. But the chapter lengths were good; made it easy to set stop and start points.

Any additional comments?

My main criticism was the narrator's voice of the humans. It was too hillbilly slurred for my liking, and quiet. I had to repeat a few times to make sure I heard/comprehended it all.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • The Case of the Cursed Dodo

  • The Endangered Files, Book 1
  • By: Jake G. Panda
  • Narrated by: Michael McConnohie, J.W. Terry, Dave Mallow, and others
  • Length: 2 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22

Listen up. If you're looking for trouble, you've found it. His name's Jake G. Panda and he's a wildlife investigator. This hard-boiled bear works at a flophouse for endangered critters called the Last Resort. He's the hotel snoop. The resident fuzz. It's his job to keep these unusual guests safe and outta harm's way. This hilarious first installment of The Endangered Files is a wild and woolly mystery involving a missing guest, a green bird, and a bunch of double-crossing critters all hot on the trail of The Cursed Dodo.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Audio Cartoon a winner.

  • By cosmitron on 04-11-18

A Unique and Entertaining Story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

What did you love best about The Case of the Cursed Dodo?

The various character voices were nice; it made it easier to keep track of who was speaking. I also enjoyed the cliche, goofy jokes. I chuckled many times while listening. I really liked the quick summaries at the beginning of each chapter. Even though I literally just listened, it helped sort of reel me back in and keep me on track. I found the story to be entertaining and it had some plot twists that kept me engaged.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Case of the Cursed Dodo?

Well, I'll try to describe it so that I don't spoil anything, but so that those who have read it know what I'm talking about... The scene at the end with Jake and Daisy, when she has the item from the box. Then, the very end when we find out more about the item. That plot twist was my favorite, and I thought it was pretty clever.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

Yep. The "movie script reading" style was great. I enjoyed the pace of the narration and the pace of the story.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. I have an hour commute, so it took me three rides to listen to it all. If I had time I would have loved to listen to it all; it was hard to turn it off an go into work. Next long road trip with my girlfriend, we might give it a shot.

Any additional comments?

I did have a few criticisms on the "performance". The scene change noise (two camera shutters) was annoying; I appreciated the notification of a scene change, but it should have been a different noise. Also I was not a fan of the sound/voice for text being read. It sounded like someone yelling in an empty auditorium, including the echo. Lastly, some scenes also sounded quite echo-ey, and was distracting.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • Leadership Lessons from Sun Tzu and The Art of War

  • By: Matt Harrison
  • Narrated by: Nate Sjol
  • Length: 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16

Sun Tzu's The Art of War is one of the world's most influential books about leadership. It has been read and utilized not only by military professionals and generals, but by CEOs of companies, by teachers and pastors, and by many in leadership positions. Those who want to be successful leaders should follow Sun Tzu's teachings. While his book is focused on war and battle, it can be translated easily to modern day life. The lessons Sun Tzu teaches are vital to manage a successful business or any venture. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good things in a small package.

  • By cosmitron on 04-17-18

Entertaining Quick Summary

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

Would you listen to Leadership Lessons from Sun Tzu and The Art of War again? Why?

Yes. It was short enough that it is easy to play again (actually did listen to it again already). Despite the short length, there was a lot in there to take in, so it's good for a few listens.

What did you like best about this story?

I liked how the war/soldier stuff was compared to businesses and everyday life. I thought the analogies provided were accurate and helpful. I've heard about this book a lot, and I would like to actually read The Art of War, but this was a great little preview into the book. It gave me the bare bones, so when I read the full book, I will be putting flesh on the bones (which makes it easier to learn in my opinion).

What does Nate Sjol bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

He was easy to listen to, but I would say he was just average. I don't have any criticisms, but I also don't really have any praise.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yep. It was only 30 minutes and I have an hour commute. I actually listened to it twice in one sitting.

Any additional comments?

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.

  • Ripple for Beginners: An Introduction to XRP

  • By: Ron Stern
  • Narrated by: Andrew Heron
  • Length: 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

Ryan Fugger conceived Ripple in 2004 after working on a local exchange trading system in Vancouver. The intent was to create a monetary system that was decentralized and could effectively empower individuals and communities to create their own money. Fugger later built the first iteration of this system, RipplePay.com. Concurrently, in May 2011, Jed McCaleb began developing a digital currency system in which transactions were verified by consensus among members of the network, rather than by the mining process used by Bitcoin.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • nice infobook

  • By Rebecca Azizov on 05-04-18

Just Read Wikipedia Instead

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-18

What would have made Ripple for Beginners: An Introduction to XRP better?

It should have been even shorter. Half of the content was useless. Also it irked me that when it came to the few stats that were reported, everyone else's stats were rounded to the hundred or thousand, but the Ripple stat went down to the ones digit, to give it every last percent.

What was most disappointing about Ron Stern’s story?

While some of the content was useful and interesting, I found the entire listen to be completely biased. It would have been nice to have a bit of a more balanced view. It was annoying that he said "Ripple is for people with open minds", when he himself was closed minded.

How could the performance have been better?

It sounded like someone was reading from a high school book report. The step by step instructions for "how to Ripple" was completely unnecessary and a waste of time. The "common speech terms" should have been removed. The book should not use phrases like "you don't have to take our word for it" and "you're good to go"; they felt entirely out of place.

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Half was interesting and I enjoyed that. The other half disappointed me.

Any additional comments?

I listened to it a second time to see if I was just being harsh, but it just solidified that overall I did not enjoy the experience.

This book was given to me for free at my request and I provided this voluntary review.