LISTENER

mark helm

nashville, TN
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 9
  • ratings
  • The Pillars of the Earth

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 40 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,128
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,665
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,706

The Pillars of the Earth tells the story of Philip, prior of Kingsbridge, a devout and resourceful monk driven to build the greatest Gothic cathedral the world has known...of Tom, the mason who becomes his architect - a man divided in his soul...of the beautiful, elusive Lady Aliena, haunted by a secret shame...and of a struggle between good and evil that will turn church against state, and brother against brother.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Epic story to be read by all!

  • By Gina on 07-25-09

Fantastic historical romance

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-18

Killer book, awesome narration! I give this an 11 out of 10 and, well, read it, damnit!

  • Never a Dull Moment

  • 1971 - the Year That Rock Exploded
  • By: David Hepworth
  • Narrated by: David Hepworth
  • Length: 11 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 117
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 114

On New Year's Eve, 1970, Paul McCartney told his lawyers to issue the writ at the High Court in London, effectively ending The Beatles. You might say this was the last day of the pop era. The following day, which was a Friday, was 1971. You might say this was the first day of the rock era. And within the remaining 364 days of this monumental year, the world would hear Don McLean's "American Pie", The Rolling Stones' "Brown Sugar", The Who's "Baba O'Riley", Zeppelin's "Stairway to Heaven", and more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A blast from the past

  • By Amazon Customer on 07-30-16

Fucking Spectacular!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-17

David Hepworrh is my new rock guru: he knows his shit inside-out and backwards and his text (and deft delivery thereof) is rye and subtly hilarious in a way only an English elder statesman can be. I'm reading it again--this time, I'm getting drunk!

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Diamond Age

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Wiltsie
  • Length: 18 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,710
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,547
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,566

Neal Stephenson, "the hottest science fiction writer in America", takes science fiction to dazzling new levels. The Diamond Age is a stunning tale; set in 21st-century Shanghai, it is the story of what happens what a state-of-the-art interactive device falls into the hands of a street urchin named Nell. Her life, and the entire future of humanity, is about to be decoded and reprogrammed.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The rock could use a bit more polishing

  • By Tango on 05-19-13

Groundbreaking Cybrt-Punk

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-17

Just read it. Killer tome!, And beautiful narration by a British woman with Victorian aplomb.

  • The Postmortal

  • A Novel
  • By: Drew Magary
  • Narrated by: Johnny Heller
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 370
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 331
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 334

In a world where an anti-aging cure is available worldwide, immortality comes with its own unique problems. John Farrell is about to get "The Cure". Old age can never kill him now. The only problem is, everything else still can.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting concept but bleak and wearing

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-15-12

Interesting and Engaging

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-17

Good dysropian fantasy. But the writing was a tad forced, with a great big similie in every paragraph. Magary skates dangerously close to "The moon was like an angry pregnant alien with bad skin" territory --whatever that means. Anyway, it's not in the same league as his brilliant "The Hike."

  • The Hike

  • By: Drew Magary
  • Narrated by: Christopher Lane
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,537
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,526

When Ben, a suburban family man, takes a business trip to rural Pennsylvania, he decides to spend the afternoon before his dinner meeting on a short hike. Once he sets out into the woods behind his hotel, he quickly comes to realize that the path he has chosen cannot be given up easily. With no choice but to move forward, Ben finds himself falling deeper and deeper into a world of man-eating giants, bizarre demons, and colossal insects.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best ending I can remember

  • By David on 05-08-17

Mind-blowing & Mythic

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-16-17

Magary manages a compellingly strange hero journey, straight outta Joseph Campbell. As touching as it is quirky. Great read.

  • Cured

  • The Tale of Two Imaginary Boys
  • By: Lol Tolhurst
  • Narrated by: Lol Tolhurst
  • Length: 9 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 185

Cured is not only the first insider account of the early days of the band, it is a revealing look at the artistic evolution of the enigmatic Robert Smith, the iconic lead singer, songwriter, and innovative guitarist at the heart of The Cure. A deeply rebellious, sensitive, tough, and often surprisingly "normal" young man, Smith was from the start destined for stardom, a fearless nonconformist and provocateur who soon found his own musical language through which to express his considerable and unique talent.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent

  • By Amazon Customer on 10-24-16

Honest and Engaging, a Cure-all for Fans!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-17

Gotta love Lol Tolherst. Suoerb rock & roll memoir of his life in The Cure.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Sound Man

  • A Life Recording Hits With the Rolling Stones, the Who, Led Zeppelin, the Eagles, Eric Clapton, the Faces…
  • By: Glyn Johns
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 6 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 227
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 214
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 211

Born just outside London in 1942, Glyn Johns was 16 years old at the dawn of rock and roll. His big break as a producer came on the Steve Miller Band's debut album, Children of the Future. He went on to engineer or produce iconic albums for the best in the business, including Abbey Road with the Beatles. Even more impressive, Johns was perhaps the only person on a given day in the studio who was entirely sober, and so he is one of the most reliable and clear-eyed insiders to tell these stories today.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • No tell all ... not at all

  • By MeDC on 07-04-15
  • Sound Man
  • A Life Recording Hits With the Rolling Stones, the Who, Led Zeppelin, the Eagles, Eric Clapton, the Faces…
  • By: Glyn Johns
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance

Amazing Stories, But Boredom and Ego Intrude

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-16

What made the experience of listening to Sound Man the most enjoyable?

The sheer fact of John's spectacular career and the who's who of rock royalty he's worked with--mostly quite successfully.

What did you like best about this story?

It's the greatest hits that really shine--the big events and the intimate moments with the 20th Century's great rock talents.

What three words best describe Simon Vance’s voice?

British, High-Brow, Articulate

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Rarely, though I remain in awe of his body of work.

Any additional comments?

Several sections (especially the first 3rd of the tome) can be rather boring. Too often, I found myself skimming page after page in search of the the 'good bits" (the memoir can go for pages focusing on parts of Johns' life that, frankly, just aren't all that interesting).

Also, too often and too transparently, Johns' practices the art of the left-handed compliment (praising someone to the heights whist simultaneously bitching about them--all in an ego-driven attempt to ensure he comes off as well as possible). Didn't he have an editor? Was there no one who could tell the master what he should just leave out?!

Even when Johns' is admitting to a misstep, he typically makes sure to praise himself for having learned from the experience. These elements of the memoir--coupled with all the not-so-subtle moralizing about the evils of drugs and alcohol--can make Johns' come off as unlikeable and smarmy. Or, maybe just well-heeled and British.

We get it, Glyn--you're the consummate pro (but a more secure man of his age and reputation would have just let the work speak for itself).

1 of 1 people found this review helpful