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  • The Red Thread

  • A Search for Ideological Drivers Inside the Anti-Trump Conspiracy
  • By: Diana West
  • Narrated by: Diana West
  • Length: 4 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 48

The first investigation into why a ring of senior Washington officials went rogue to derail the election and the presidency of Donald Trump. There was nothing normal about the 2016 presidential election, not when senior US officials were turning the surveillance powers of the federal government - designed to stop terrorist attacks - against the Republican presidential team. These were the ruthless tactics of a Soviet-style police state, not a democratic republic. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Welcome addition to "American Betrayal"!

  • By Kurt on 04-23-19

Must read. Full of details about spygate plotters

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-02-19

If you are following the USA's current spygate and FISA-gate scandal, this book is an absolute must-read. It is full of background details about the plotters which are seldom or never mentioned elsewhere. John Brennan's communist past is well known, but James Comey's communist influences are a lot less well known. The book also covers Hillary Clinton, Bill Browder, John Kerry, Christopher Steele, David Kramer and Nellie Ohr, along with the people who influenced them.

The book is short, however it is well worth the purchase price or well worth one credit.

Diana West does a splendid job of narrating her own book.

  • The Irrational Atheist

  • Dissecting the Unholy Trinity of Dawkins, Harris, and Hitchens
  • By: Vox Day
  • Narrated by: Jon Mollison
  • Length: 9 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60

On one side of the argument is a collection of godless academics with doctorates from the finest universities in England, France, and the United States. On the other is Irrational Atheist author Vox Day, armed with nothing more than historical and statistical facts. Presenting a compelling argument (but not for the side one might expect), Day strips away the pseudo-scientific pretentions of New Atheism with his intelligent application of logic, history, military science, political economy, and well-documented research.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Snarky, hilarious and insightful

  • By Anonymous User on 12-20-18

Refreshing, intelligent rebuttal to Harris et al.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-19

This is a great book and worth reading.

I am a fan of all of these writers. I have books by Vox Day as well as books by Dawkins, Harris and Hitchens. Vox's rebuttals are enlightening and thought provoking. I don't agree with every one of Vox's arguments, but I agree with a lot of them.

Many people hastily dismiss Vox because he has unusual political opinions and because his verbal style is occasionally off-putting. But Vox is a keen observer with an intense focus on keeping arguments true and honest. Vox is not going to overlook any logical slights-of-hand even by popular writers such as Dawkins and Hitchens.

I like Sam Harris personally, and I appreciate what he is trying to do with his podcasts. However, frequently I find myself flat-out disagreeing with Harris's conclusions or with his line of reasoning. As I listen to Harris, I often think that this guy just needs to be confronted and rebutted by a determined interlocutor. Vox Day is the right man for that job.

Hitchens and Vox have a few things in common. Both of them are fearless and have zero desire to satisfy conventional expectations. Both of them are verbally confrontational. Both of them demonstrate visceral anger when they perceive dishonesty or evil. As it happens, on the question of atheism/theism, they come to opposite conclusions. This debate is fascinating.

Enjoy this book!

  • Blacklisted by History

  • The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight against America’s Enemies
  • By: M. Stanton Evans
  • Narrated by: Tom Weiner
  • Length: 23 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 180
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146

Accused of creating a bogus Red scare and smearing countless innocent victims in a five-year reign of terror, Senator Joseph McCarthy is universally remembered as a demagogue, a bully, and a liar. History has judged him such a loathsome figure that even today, a half-century after his death, his name remains synonymous with witch hunts. But that conventional image is all wrong, as veteran journalist and author M. Stanton Evans reveals in this groundbreaking book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Joe McCarthy was Correct!!!

  • By Terry Richmond on 08-22-18

Fascinating and important (but super-detailed)

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-19

This is a great book but it is a little bit too detailed for my interests. I'm not a researcher or a specialist, so my interest in this topic only extends so far. I had trouble maintaining attention on the book.

However, all of the details here are really fascinating. I appreciate the author's work in making this information available. More people should be aware of this history.

  • Twain’s Feast

  • By: Audible Originals
  • Narrated by: Nick Offerman
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 9,342
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,602
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8,572

Mark Twain, beloved American writer, performer, and humorist, was a self-proclaimed glutton. With the help of a chef and some friends, Nick Offerman presents the story of Twain’s life through the lens of eight of Mark Twain’s favorite foods.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Audible Recycling

  • By Greg Hill on 11-17-18

This is about food. The entire thing is about food

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-19

Talking about food bores me to tears. This podcast was not for me. Maybe other people enjoy this, but I don't. The entire podcast is about food.

  • First World War: Still No End in Sight

  • By: Frank Furedi
  • Narrated by: Greg Wagland
  • Length: 12 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20

That the conflicts unleashed by Great War did not end in 1918 is well known. World War II and the Cold War clearly constitute key moments in the drama that began in August 1914. This audiobook argues that the battle of ideas which crystallised during the course of the Great War continue to the present. It claims that the disputes about lifestyles and identity - the Culture Wars of today - are only the latest expressions of a century long conflict. There are many influences that contributed to the outbreak of World War One.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting

  • By Jean on 05-24-14

Interesting thesis, but poorly argued. Skip it.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-19

This book has an interesting thesis, but the author does a terrible job of elaborating and defending it. The author seems to be lost in his own abstractions. He only very rarely gets around to supplying any concrete evidence that demonstrates the reality of those abstractions.

Even if you think this thesis is worth exploring, I recommend skipping this book.

The narrator is good, but far too slow. I listened to the book at 125% speed.

  • The Big Ones

  • How Natural Disasters Have Shaped Us (and What We Can Do About Them)
  • By: Lucy Jones
  • Narrated by: Lucy Jones
  • Length: 9 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72

Earthquakes, floods, tsunamis, hurricanes, volcanoes - they stem from the same forces that give our planet life. Earthquakes give us natural springs; volcanoes produce fertile soil. It is only when these forces exceed our ability to withstand them that they become disasters. Together they have shaped our cities and their architecture; elevated leaders and toppled governments; influenced the way we think, feel, fight, unite, and pray. The history of natural disasters is a history of ourselves.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting, but neither deep nor insightful

  • By Tim on 12-29-18

Interesting, but neither deep nor insightful

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-29-18

This is not a scientific book. Listeners hoping to hear something about the science of storms or earthquakes or tsunamis will mostly be disappointed.

The topic of this book is human responses to catastrophes. That is an interesting topic on its own.

The book is preachy. That would be a problem if the book were a science book. However, this author is on a soap box talking about the value of preparedness and about the sometimes irrational responses to catastrophes.

The main value of the book in the historical anecdotes about particular "big ones": the Lisbon earthquake, the Sacramento floods, hurricane Katrina, and several large earthquakes. The book is worth listening to solely to hear these anecdotes.

I wish the book had gone into more depth on the topic of preparedness and on the details of how societies respond to catastrophes The author's insights and reflections were valuable, but too skimpy.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

The Oedipus Plays
    An Audible Original Drama
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Sophocles,
    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Ian Johnston - translator
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Jamie Glover,
    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Hayley Atwell,
    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Michael Maloney,
    
    
        and others
    


    
    Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
    753 ratings
    Overall 4.4
  • The Oedipus Plays

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Sophocles, Ian Johnston - translator
  • Narrated by: Jamie Glover, Hayley Atwell, Michael Maloney, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 753
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 692
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 692

The three Theban plays by Sophocles - Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus and Antigone - are one of the great landmarks of Western theatre. They tell the story of Oedipus, King of Thebes, who was destined to suffer a terrible fate - to kill his father, marry his mother, and beget children of the incestuous union. He does this unknowingly but still has to suffer terrible consequences, which also tragically affect the next generation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • So Well Done!

  • By LacyADM on 07-12-16

Fine, as long as you don't mind loud yelling

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-19-18

This is a nice production. I was happy to spend a credit on it, and I will be happy to spend more credits on similar Audible original productions in the future.

However I do have a few criticisms and suggestions for the future.

Tragedy does not mean "loud yelling." A large percentage of this production included the actors yelling loudly. It was over the top.

Memorandum to all voice actors and Audible producers: You can communicate anger and pathos without yelling. Really. It's possible. The actors in this production were practically spitting with rage. This was unneeded.

The audio quality was less than ideal. Something was wrong with the studio room or the microphones or something.

Much of the dialog was simply too fast. The combination of shouting, poor audio quality, and relatively complex dialog forced me to slow the performance down. I listened to the entire Oedipus Rex at 80% speed, and Oedipus at Colonus at 90% speed.

I could not distinguish one character's voice from another. The male voices were all too similar to each other. For large parts of the story I could not tell which character was speaking or why. I think the producers should consider adding brief stage comments here and there, indicating what the scene is and who is in the scene, etc.

Last comment: It is 2018 and Audible still does not have string titles for chapters! The start of the play Oedipus at Colonus is listed as "Chapter 21".

In what universe is it acceptable to retitle "Oedipus at Colonus" to "Chapter 21"?

Elon Musk just literally launched a Tesla into orbit, and built rockets that come back to the launch pad. DeepMind engineers have taught their computers to beat world champions at Go, and taught their computers to teach themselves to play chess. Meanwhile, Audible executives and product managers still haven't bothered to get their engineering teams to provide text strings as chapter titles. In what year can we expect this to happen? 2020? 2030?

  • The Strange Death of Europe

  • Immigration, Identity, Islam
  • By: Douglas Murray
  • Narrated by: Robert Davies
  • Length: 12 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,676
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,517
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,511

The Strange Death of Europe is a highly personal account of a continent and culture caught in the act of suicide. Declining birth rates, mass immigration, and cultivated self-distrust and self-hatred have come together to make Europeans unable to argue for themselves and incapable of resisting their own comprehensive alteration as a society and an eventual end.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Disturbing dystopian preview of tidal wave

  • By smarmer on 11-10-17

Buy it. Read it. Seriously. Just do it.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

If you are sitting on the fence wondering whether to buy this book: Buy it. It's among the most important books of the past few years.

You don't need to agree with every one of the author's opinions. But every thinking person should at least read this book, and judge for themselves.

The books is well written, coherent and shows a great deal of empathy for everyone in Europe, including native populations as well as incoming migrants. The author has done his homework. The narration is excellent.

Many readers will be unaware of what has been happening in Europe. This book will let you know about recent events, but beyond that, it investigates the spiritual/psychological causes and effects of these events, in a language that is accessible to any reader.

  • 1177 B.C.

  • The Year Civilization Collapsed
  • By: Eric H. Cline
  • Narrated by: Andy Caploe
  • Length: 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,801
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,638
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,627

In 1177 B.C., marauding groups known only as the "Sea Peoples" invaded Egypt. The pharaoh’s army and navy managed to defeat them, but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline, as did most of the surrounding civilizations. After centuries of brilliance, the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end. Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades. No more Minoans or Mycenaeans. No more Trojans, Hittites, or Babylonians.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wanted to Like... And Did!

  • By Brett M Miller on 09-12-14

Jumbled text. Juvenile narration. Skip it.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

From the title, I expected that this book might have a thesis, but there didn't appear to be any thesis. It was just series of anecdotes and arcane details about the ancient world, each of which was interesting, but the connections between them were not ever spelled out anywhere.

Did the author have a point? Was there some idea that the author was trying to defend? I couldn't tell.

This would be a much better book if it carried the title: "Interesting Anecdotes About the Ancient World."

Andy Caploe should not narrate this kind of book. Caploe should confine his work strictly to children's literature. Caploe's narration is sing-songy and attempts to inject excitement into every single sentence. For any listener over the age of eleven, this narrative style is maddening. Distracting and maddening.

Caploe's narration is bad enough to ruin the audiobook all by itself.

  • The Swerve

  • How the World Became Modern
  • By: Stephen Greenblatt
  • Narrated by: Edoardo Ballerini
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,518
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,208
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,200

Nearly six hundred years ago, a short, genial, cannily alert man in his late 30s took a very old manuscript off a library shelf, saw with excitement what he had discovered, and ordered that it be copied. That book was the last surviving manuscript of an ancient Roman philosophical epic by Lucretius—a beautiful poem containing the most dangerous ideas: that the universe functioned without the aid of gods, that religious fear was damaging to human life, and that matter was made up of very small particles.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Too many swerves

  • By A reader on 05-20-12

Meandering, but worthwhile for renaissance fans

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-18-18

This book is meandering. It's a mixed up salad of biographical details about Poggio Bracciolini (the re-discoverer of Lucretius's famous poem), extended observations about the worldview of the middle ages and the early renaissance, and an examination of the influence of Lucretius's work.

The author's thesis isn't much of a thesis because he doesn't really spend much time defending it, or even articulating it. The book is undecided about what it wants to be. Is it a biography of Poggio, or is it an examination of the influence of Lucretius on later thinkers? By page count, it's more of a biography.

I enjoyed the book anyway because I'm fascinated with the way ancient Greek and Roman texts were rediscovered by scholars, and yes I actually do want to know about the worldview of such people. So I didn't mind much that the author's narrative was jumbled. I was happy to sit and listen to a collection of loosely-connected (or not-connected) anecdotes. Fine with me! It was a good book.

Edoardo Ballerini didn't mispronounce any Italian or Latin words, which is a wonderful thing.

On the negative side, Ballerini's narration was too dramatic and too emotional.

Will somebody please break the news to the narrators (and their directors and producers) that no, it is not necessary to read every single line of a book as if each line were an emotional epiphany? It's perfectly OK to read a book with an even emotional tone. If I wanted melodrama, I would watch a soap opera.