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Ocean State Prime

Cumberland, RI, United States
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  • 237
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  • The Alex Cave Series, Books 1-3

  • By: James M. Corkill
  • Narrated by: Paul J. McSorley
  • Length: 27 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 17

While on vacation sailing the waters of the Puget Sound, geophysicist Alex Cave hears a mayday call on the radio and sees a brilliant flash of neon-blue light surround an oil tanker. He changes course to help and discovers there was no explosion, no one on board, and the oil has mysteriously vanished without a trace.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Alex Cave

  • By ZOE R on 02-17-19

not good

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-19

Only finished the first book of the three, Dead Energy. I don't have the energy to listen to the other two. Dead Energy was a collection of extremely well-worn tropes and cliches. The main character is not very exciting, nor were any of the other characters in the first book. The few bits of science fiction included in the story were either completely imaginary or were based on faulty science. Character development minimal. Character interaction employed the same nuance as dialogue between third graders. Female characters were preposterous. Did not like the narrator.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Years of Rice and Salt

  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 25 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 620
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 573
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 573

It is the 14th century, and one of the most apocalyptic events in human history is set to occur - the coming of the Black Death. History teaches us that a third of Europe's population was destroyed. But what if the plague had killed 99 percent of the population instead? How would the world have changed? This is a look at the history that could have been - a history that stretches across centuries, a history that sees dynasties and nations rise and crumble, a history that spans horrible famine and magnificent innovation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Alternate History as Philosophical Vehicle

  • By Mark Patterson on 08-22-15

felt like years getting through this listen

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-19

This is a very long listen. If you are like me, you will stick it out to the end to see if the long, long story comes to a compelling ending. Again, if you are like me, you will find that it does not. I'm going to read up on this book a little more to understand what the ending was, other than the writer may have run out of paper, typewriter ribbon or was struck with carpal tunnel syndrome. I suspect there is some meaning I did not grasp.

Ironically, I was frustrated in the first half of the book when it switched characters just when I was getting into them; the second half of the book I yearned for the characters to switch. The character who gets the longest point-of-view treatment is passive, nondescript and generally boring.

Not sure why this book was categorized in the science fiction section other than KSR's output has been mostly in this genre. This is an alternate history starting from the premise that the Christians all (incredibly) died of plague (or something) and the two remaining dominant cultures, China and Islam, become the driving forces for human history. If you find that idea intriguing then you may like this book. But there is not one bit of science fiction in it, so if you're looking for that you will be disappointed.

There is much discussion of Chinese culture, Confucianism, Buddhism, various strains of Islam, and some other cultures and religions. I don't know how much of an expert KSR is on these things, so I'm not sure if this is educational or mis-educational. I learned quite a few things, so I hope he wasn't too far off.

  • The Ophiuchi Hotline

  • By: John Varley
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 183
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 121
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 123

The invaders came in 2050...they did not kill anyone outright. They said they came on behalf of the intelligent species of Earth - dolphins and whales. The invaders quietly destroyed every evidence of technology, then peacefully departed, leaving behind plowed ground and sprouting seeds. In the next two years, 10 billion humans starved to death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very good Sci-Fi

  • By Kelli on 08-25-10

still pretty good after all these years

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-19

I remember liking this book when I read it as a new paperback. Forty years later it doesn't seem dated. However, I remembered the ending, which maybe took something away from it this time around. I felt the ending was deus ex invader and therefore a letdown. I could have done without the sex scenes too, which maybe in 1977 were edgy, but now were something I wanted to skip. Zackman did a fine job as the narrator.

  • Big Week

  • The Biggest Air Battle of World War II
  • By: James Holland
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 15 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 188
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 172
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171

During the third week of February 1944, the combined Allied air forces based in Britain and Italy launched their first round-the-clock bomber offensive against Germany. Their goal: to smash the main factories and production centers of the Luftwaffe while also drawing German planes into an aerial battle of attrition to neutralize the Luftwaffe as a fighting force prior to the cross-channel invasion, planned for a few months later. Officially called Operation ARGUMENT, this aerial offensive quickly became known as “Big Week,” and it was one of the turning-points of World War II. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • War in the Air: Sets stage with gripping narrative

  • By Nashville Cat on 11-17-18

detailed coverage of pre-D-Day air war in Europe

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-08-19

Interesting and informative. More detail than I could absorb listening while driving. The point of view rotates between British, American and German forces and between bomber and fighter forces, but there are no pauses to indicate such transitions. It routinely took a couple or more sentences for me to grasp the new context. This probably would not have been a problem if I were reading the book instead of listening to it.

I didn't love Gardner's reading, perhaps because I am familiar with his reading of the Vorkosigan science-fiction saga, to which this history bears little resemblance.

  • Beowulf

  • By: Seamus Heaney (translator)
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 499
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 464
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 468

Written a thousand years ago, this long poem is the very first surviving piece of English literature. Join Beowulf, a young warrior, as he achieves glory by fighting and killing three fantastic monsters. This new translation, by the Nobel laureate poet Seamus Heaney, offers modern listeners an accessible, intensely dramatic text. It amply demonstrates why this epic has spread its influence over more than a millennium of literature.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Almost perfect

  • By Tad Davis on 01-28-13

enjoyed it

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-19

I'm not qualified to comment on Beowulf the epic poem nor Heaney's translation of it. Guidall's reading of it was more than satisfactory for me, though I can't say how well it matches with Heaney's intent. Regardless, I enjoyed it, though I was glad I had watched several seasons of Vikings to get a better understanding of their plunder or be plundered ethos.

After the poem itself is an essay by Heaney about Beowulf and his translation of it. I found this to be fascinating and enlightening. I think I enjoyed the essay more than the poem, though I was slightly tempted to go back and listen to Beowulf again, now armed with background and understanding. (Someday...)

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fata Morgana

  • By: Steven R. Boyett, Ken Mitchroney
  • Narrated by: Macleod Andrews
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,220
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,209

At the height of the air war in Europe, Captain Joe Farley and the baseball-loving, wisecracking crew of the B-17 Flying Fortress Fata Morgana are in the middle of a harrowing bombing mission over East Germany when everything goes sideways. The bombs are still falling, and flak is still exploding all around the 20-ton bomber as it is knocked like a bathtub duck into another world. Suddenly stranded with the final outcasts of a desolated world, Captain Farley navigates a maze of treachery and wonder.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A rare gem - Realism within fantasy

  • By Tim on 01-07-18

war machine enters portal -- again!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-14-19

As if there weren't enough stories about military machines traveling through portals to other times or universes, we have this one. (I got it in a 2 for 1 sale and the other was good, so this one was essentially free.) This one starts out as Twelve O'Clock High or Catch 22 and is pretty good at that point. Then the plane travels through the anomaly and it becomes a 60's B movie or an episode of Time Tunnel. A little bit of Connecticut Yankee action ensues as our heroes apply themselves in their new circumstances. It's downhill from this point as the plot becomes silly and then comes to an anticlimactic conclusion. Well really not a conclusion because the story goes on and on in a maudlin and boring manner, ending well after my interest could be sustained. I'm giving it two stars for the story because some of it was entertaining. The performance was good.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Butchering Art

  • Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine
  • By: Lindsey Fitzharris
  • Narrated by: Ralph Lister
  • Length: 7 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,510
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,404
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,403

In The Butchering Art, the historian Lindsey Fitzharris reveals the shocking world of 19th-century surgery on the eve of profound transformation. She conjures up early operating theaters - no place for the squeamish - and surgeons, working before anesthesia, who were lauded for their speed and brute strength. They were baffled by the persistent infections that kept mortality rates stubbornly high. A young, melancholy Quaker surgeon named Joseph Lister would solve the deadly riddle and change the course of history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not one boring moment!

  • By WRWF on 12-22-17

gory but interesting and entertaining

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-19

I've long been curious about how surgery evolved from the practices depicted in the age of sail historical fictions that I enjoy reading. This book fit the bill exactly. If you visualize what is being described, you could find yourself overwhelmed unless you have a strong stomach. It's not all gore and the gore serves a purpose in showing how bad things were and what a difference Lister made. I found it fascinating, educational and (mostly) enjoyable.

  • Planetside

  • By: Michael Mammay
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 8 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,925
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,826
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,822

War heroes aren't usually called out of semi-retirement and sent to the far reaches of the galaxy for a routine investigation. So when Colonel Carl Butler answers the call from an old and powerful friend, he knows it's something big - and he's not being told the whole story. A high councilor's son has gone MIA out of Cappa Base, the space station orbiting a battle-ravaged planet. The young lieutenant had been wounded and evacuated - but there's no record of him having ever arrived at hospital command. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't put it down!

  • By Rebecca Enzor on 08-02-18

silver is the new gold

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-18

The story is set hundreds of years in the future. People haven't changed at all. Could just have well have been set during WWII, except for the underlying mystery. That mystery is a Mary Shelly-esque sub-plot that is extraordinarily weak and cliche. Subsequent to the mystery being revealed, the story deteriorates rapidly. Thank goodness the end comes quickly because it gets pretty tiresome.

  • Alien: Out of the Shadows

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Tim Lebbon, Dirk Maggs
  • Narrated by: Rutger Hauer, Corey Johnson, Matthew Lewis, and others
  • Length: 4 hrs and 28 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25,453
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,689
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 23,626

As a child, Chris Hooper dreamed of monsters. But in deep space, he found only darkness and isolation. Then, on planet LV178, he and his fellow miners discovered a storm-scoured, sand-blasted hell - and trimonite, the hardest material known to man. When a shuttle crashes into the mining ship Marion, the miners learn that there was more than trimonite deep in the caverns. There was evil, hibernating and waiting for suitable prey.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • a work that I highly recommend

  • By AudioBook Reviewer on 05-02-16

Ripley versus aliens again

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-27-18

If you want another installment of Ripley battling aliens, then this might be for you. Plows no new ground. The ending is known before you start listening, as it has to fit between Alien and Aliens. Pretty dumb idea for a book in my opinion. Dramatization is okay except for the idiotic "Welcome to this section" announcements (which are not funny like the doors in Hitchhiker's Guide) and the repetitive log entries from the AI. I'd rather listen to a good reading of a book than a radio play such as this.

  • The Tide

  • By: Anthony Melchiorri
  • Narrated by: Ryan Kennard Burke
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 830
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 751
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 750

Captain Dominic Holland leads a crew of skilled covert operatives and talented scientific personnel. He's taken them to all corners of the Earth to protect the United States from biological and chemical warfare. When his CIA handler, Meredith Webb, gives him a mission to investigate a disturbing lead on a laboratory based out of an abandoned oil rig, they discover the most terrifying threat to mankind they've ever faced - a genetically engineered biological weapon called the Oni Agent.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Tide Series by Anthony J Melchiorri

  • By Murphy on 08-17-16

yet another zombie story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-17-18

A zombie by any other name would smell as foul. Here are some more words.