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  • Addicted to Outrage

  • By: Glenn Beck
  • Narrated by: Glenn Beck
  • Length: 15 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 325
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 308
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 304

In Addicted to Outrage, New York Times best-selling author Glenn Beck addresses how America has become more and more divided - both politically and socially. Americans are now less accepting, less forgiving, and have lost faith in many of the country's signature ideals. They are quick to point a judgmental finger at the opposing party, are unwilling to doubt their own ideologies, and refuse to have any self-awareness whatsoever. Beck states that this current downward spiral will ultimately lead to the destruction of everything America has fought so hard to preserve.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Audible book ever!

  • By Cheryl on 09-21-18

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

This is Glenn's first book in years that I really enjoyed and would say is 5-stars. He addresses our biggest issue right now, and that is the fake outrage that sweeps through everything we do. Manufactured, meant to divide, meant to drive people into smaller and smaller subgroups so they need the protection of big government, it's a far left anti-western campaign to bring down our culture. Glenn deals with this in a very fair way, in fact I'd often say way too fair to the point of almost being passive in allowing lestist narratives to survive despite them having no grounds in reality. However I say ALMOST too far since the book isn't about surrendering or giving in, it's more about how to make points and how to get Democrats (not the far left nujobs, but your normal Dems) to realize what is happening. I'm not as sure as Glenn that these people exist in large numbers and will rebel and take their party back, but we shall see.

Anyways this book would be an excellent read for anyone that is trying to live and/or work with people on the left and want to know how to reach out to them in a way that they'll accept. This is not a red meat conservative book, it's as balanced as it can be for someone who is conservative, and it doesn't violate that belief system. Also it's an entertaining book, it's not boring or dry and doesn't lecture, it's Glenn doing what he does best, and that is telling stories.

Glenn also narrates the book and does a fantastic job, as you'd expect from someone that has done radio his entire life. This is not a straight boring read, it's done with emotion and humor, which is a very good thing. Also Glenn goes off script here and there, which is refreshing.

Overall this is a 5-star book and should be a must read for people that want to understand what is happening and how to read out to Democrats who haven't gone full alt-left yet. It should be must reading for anyone that considers themselves in the middle as well as Democrats who want to understand why there is such a rebellion against the SJW culture.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Briefing

  • Politics, the Press, and the President
  • By: Sean Spicer
  • Narrated by: Sean Spicer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 144
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 143

For more than two decades, Sean Spicer had been a respected political insider, working as a campaign and communications strategist. But in December 2016, he got the call of a lifetime. President-elect Donald J. Trump had chosen him to be the White House press secretary. And life hasn’t been the same since. When he accepted the job, Spicer was far from a household name. But then he walked into the bright lights of the briefing room, and the cameras started rolling. His every word was scrutinized. Every movement was parodied. Every detail became a meme. And that’s just the public side.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • By Bobbie Lieggi on 08-24-18

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

I heard Spicer making the rounds and he wasn't doing the typical generic politician deal, he wasn't bashing Trump but wasn't saying he's the greatest guy in the world either, he seemed to be telling his story and it sounded interesting, so I picked up the book fully expecting to refund if it was just a hack political book.

However it wasn't, it was quite an interesting and seemingly fair take on his time in the White House and how he got to his final destination. Also his take on the media should be a must read (listen) for the media, but of course they're so clueless and biased they'd just dismiss his comments without a second thought, then go back to printing DNC talking points as "news". His criticism on the media is more than just saying "fake news" and explains how DC works and why they have no interest in getting things right, and instead just play a big game of gotcha. I'm making it sound more biased than it actually is, but he does an excellent job explaining how things work and how the media purposely distorted stories. Also he explains the fit that the mainstream media through when he brought in local newspapers around the nation, made them part of his briefings, that was an extremely interesting part.

On the downside his tale of growing up and getting into politics just felt like padding. I pretty much universally hate early years in everyones biography, and this was no exception. The other criticism is that his time in the White House goes by too quickly, he should have gotten everything before the 2016 campaign out of the way in like 30 mins and spent the rest of time there, that would be my opinion.

Spicer reads the book himself and does a very good job - not 5 stars, that is reserved for very few, but just a notch below that, which is really good for a author reading his own book.

In closing it's a shame the media has basically ignored this. Had he bashed Trump you can be sure this would have sold millions of copies and he would have been on every show - but since he didn't bash Trump his media rounds was basically going on conservative radio/TV and that was about it. It's yet another indictment of how make the media and how anyone that doesn't follow their agenda doesn't have a voice.

  • Midnight in Peking

  • How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China
  • By: Paul French
  • Narrated by: Erik Singer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 301
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 266
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 266

Peking in 1937 is a heady mix of privilege and scandal, opulence and opium dens, rumors and superstition. The Japanese are encircling the city, and the discovery of Pamela Werner's body sends a shiver through already nervous Peking. Is it the work of a madman? One of the ruthless Japanese soldiers now surrounding the city? With the suspect list growing and clues sparse, two detectives - one British and one Chinese - race against the clock to solve the crime before the Japanese invade and Peking as they know it is gone forever.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Old Murder Still Mysterious

  • By Helen on 06-05-12

Doesn't go anywhere

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

I love history and hate fiction, it's just a waste of time, whoever when history / nonfiction is at it's best it reads like a novel, just without wizards and peoples goblins and all that nonsense. Anywho a good murder mystery, that is based on real events, in a setting like this should be a homerun, but it's not. The author uses way too much conjecture for the story to have much in terms of credibility. Also the account of the book is taken from the father who isn't exactly an unbiased arbitrator of the truth. You get scenarios that are based on nothing, just the author making up something, it's not based on police reports or anything, and you have the flat ending, which I won't get into as to not spoil the book. Finally you have the author making up dialog, which again is based on nothing.

In closing this book reads like fiction, but not in a good way, in a way where much of the content is made up since it's not based on anything - and the parts that are based on something come from an extremely biased source. The more I write this review, the more I look at my 3-star rating and think I need to lower it to 2-stars, however I think I'll keep it at 3 since I wasn't exactly bored during the book and I made it to the end without a problem. But getting to the end, that was based on there being a big ending, the big reveal, and there wasn't one. Had I know the ending of the book there is no way I would have sat through it.

On the positive side I guess is the setting. It gives you a very generic overview of the time and setting but really doesn't use the setting for much. There are interesting characters in the book, so that is good, however I do wonder how much flavor is made up, either by the author or by the source. Also the book moves mostly at a good pace, so again, I wasn't bored.

The reader does a good job, gives a professional reading. As always I listen to audiobooks at 1.25x speed since it knocked over an hour and half off the listening time while not affecting my ability to follow everything in the least. If you don't listen at 1.25x speed, you should, it can make really bad readers tolerable, and can make mediocre readers seemingly have more range while not really taking away anything except for time.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Based on a True Story

  • A Memoir
  • By: Norm Macdonald
  • Narrated by: Norm Macdonald, Tim O'Halloran
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,952
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,724
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,713

As this book's title suggests, Norm Macdonald tells the story of his life - more or less - from his origins on a farm in the-back-of-beyond Canada and an epically disastrous appearance on Star Search to his account of auditioning for Lorne Michaels and his memorable run as the anchor of Weekend Update on Saturday Night Live - until he was fired because a corporate executive didn't think he was funny. But Based on a True Story is much more than a memoir; it's the hilarious, inspired epic of Norm's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Cameron on 09-24-16

What a story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-20-18

I always thought of Norm as your typical Canadian, but boy was I wrong. In fact Norm has lead quite the life for a Canadian. Most Canadians prefer to live in trees surrounded by ice, but Norm wanted to come to America and become a big deal. This is his story, and it's quite the story, it involves sex, drugs and men dressed as women, oh and money, Norm likes money. If you like money, well this isn't the book for you since it cost money, but if you like some good old fashioned storytelling and you like to laugh, like a good hearty laugh, then you should exchange some of your money for this book.

The book is read by Norm who does a great job reading the words he wrote down.

Overall it's a 5-star book for a 5-star kind of guy.

  • Death of a Nation

  • Plantation Politics and the Making of the Democratic Party
  • By: Dinesh D'Souza
  • Narrated by: Dinesh D'Souza
  • Length: 12 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 518
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 476
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 477

Who is killing America? Is it really Donald Trump and a GOP filled with white supremacists? In this audiobook, Dinesh D’Souza makes the provocative case that Democrats are the ones killing America by turning it into a massive nanny state modeled on the Southern plantation system. Death of a Nation's bracing alternative vision of American history explains the Democratic Party's dark past, reinterprets the roles of figures like Van Buren, FDR, and LBJ, and exposes the hidden truth that racism comes not from Trump or the conservative right but rather from Democrats.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very informative.

  • By Amahra on 08-11-18

Pretty good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-15-18

If I could give it about 3.5 stars, I think that's where this would land, meaning it's a good book, but not great by any means.

Basically the book gives up a straight up northern perspective of the pre-civil war and civil war era, except for properly pointing out who was responsible for what, and the fact that the Democrats were defeated by the northern capitalist Republicans. With that said the portrayal of the Democrats is a bit cartoonish, as it's basically what modern Democrats say except for the fact they think it's not part of their history. I've read hundreds of books on the years leading up the civil war and the civil war itself and I found this part of the book to not have a lot of value to me as it's a very simple history that isn't all that nuanced. With that said I think the idea here is to preach to those who are just learning about this time period, in particular those on the left, not that I actually think anyone on the left will read this.

Once you get past the civil war / reconstruction and into the early 1900s the book gets more interesting with his history of Woodrow Wilson and then into FDR as he contends the movement in black support went to the Democrats in the 30s, not in the 60s. I would have liked some sort of data to back this up, perhaps that is provided in print but it's not provided in audio. I don't not believe him, and I've thought the same thing myself, but I'm not sure what data that is based on.

Then finally you get to the claim that the parties flipped under Nixon. I've always contended (well since I've started reading history anyways) that this is a fake narrative, and the simple way to look at it is, what do the parties stand for at different eras, and the Democrats have always been the anti-capitalist party who has viewed blacks as pets, never as equals, always as beings that have to be treated different, be they in slavery or now in the modern welfare state. The argument made by D'Souza is again not as clear as I would have liked - and lacks data to support the argument (which again might be a constraint of being an audiobook where you can't give links to source material).

Overall this book really would be eye opening for those that don't know the history, and I'd be concerned that those people would never actually listen to the book. Perhaps that's why it's so over the top about the civil war era, that's it's trying to rope in the social justice warrior crowd with cartoonish version of events in that era, but as someone well read on that era it was hard to get through.

D'Souza also reads the book and turns in a solid professional effort, no issues at all there. I listen to everything at 1.25x speed and everything sounded good, it wasn't rushed, everything was clear and easy to understand, I'd highly recommend listening at this speed as on a 13-hour book that cuts 2.5-hours from the total time and shouldn't cause any issues with retention or comprehension.

Again, overall, I'd say it's about a 3.5-star type of book.

  • Vietnam

  • A History
  • By: Stanley Karnow
  • Narrated by: Edward Holland
  • Length: 27 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 527
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 391
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389

In this comprehensive history, Stanley Karnow demystifies the tragic ordeal of America's war in Vietnam. The book's central theme is that America's leaders, prompted as much by domestic politics as by global ambitions, carried the United States into Southeast Asia with little regard for the realities of the region. Karnow elucidates the decision-making process in Washington and Asia and recounts the political and military events that occurred after the Americans arrived in Vietnam.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As stunning as it was engaging

  • By David Ewing on 08-06-07

Mostly a good overview

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

I've been looking for any Vietnam audiobook that wasn't written by an anti-war activist, and you'd be shocked at how difficult it is to find. I don't want pro-war propaganda, but just a book that tells the story of what happened. I think this might be about as good as it gets for the current options, and even it goes way off the rails once we get to Nixon.

Overall it's a good overview, it really doesn't get into much in terms of specifics but it covers a long period of time, so even at 28 hours, when you're covering a period of time this large it's hard to get into much detail - I don't knock it at all for that. Personally I don't find 28 hours all that long so to me this book had no problem keeping my interest, I was never bored.

As for the author it's a bit more tricky. The guy is clearly a leftist, but I think he makes as honest of an effort as he can to tell the story... until Nixon is involved, then at that point his hate for Nixon comes through and the amount of detail in the story completely disappears. Also while talking about LBJ the author makes logical points that seem very convincing and seem informed, but when he gets to Nixon it's a lot more speculation and sinister motivation to everything. I'm not a Nixon fan, he's before my time, but it's an injustice to not give the same benefit of the doubt that is provided with LBJ, and that's where the politics of the author comes into play. So to me the book I think is a good history up until LBJ leaves author, but after that there is just way too much speculation and personal opinion for my taste.

Also the author rarely talks about American victories, instead most of the time is talking about North Vietnam victories in the south. I don't think there is a bias at work here, it's just that he seems to know a lot more about what's going on in the south so attacks there he just has more information on.

In closing I wish this book would have been written about 25 years later so access to more information from behind the scenes would have been available, in particular for 1969 and beyond, and I think the author would have had more access to NV records as well.

As it is I'm glad I read the book, and recommend it as an intro to the subject and to take you through LBJ's years.

For the reader he did a good professional job. Also I listen to everything at 1.25x speed as it speeds up things a bit and that keeps my mind from wandering, and this reader works and sounds perfect at that speed. Even if you don't normally speed up things, I'd recommend it as you lose nothing at that speed with most readers, and on a book of this length you save 5+ hours.

  • Krakatoa

  • The Day the World Exploded, August 27, 1883
  • By: Simon Winchester
  • Narrated by: Simon Winchester
  • Length: 12 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 854
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 481
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 482

The legendary annihilation in 1883 of the volcano-island of Krakatoa (the name has since become a by-word for a cataclysmic disaster) was followed by an immense tsunami that killed nearly 40,000 people. Beyond the purely physical horrors of an event which has only very recently become properly understood, the eruption changed the world in more ways than could possibly be imagined. Dust swirled round the world for years, causing temperatures to plummet and sunsets to turn vivid.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great subject, great writing, great voice

  • By rwise on 01-26-04

Mostly dull

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

I love history books, it's all I read and when I see something new I never knew about show up I generally jump on it. This was part of those buy 2 get 1 free deals so I took a chance, based on the positive reviews, and picked this book up without knowing anything about the author or the subject.

Well... I have no idea why this book has such good ratings, it's just flat out dull. I learned a while back when listening to books if I listen at 1.25x speed my mind tends not to drift as much if I hit a slow part of a book, it helps me keep my attention on what I'm listening without sounding bad. Well in this book, the 1.25x speed trick didn't work, I was just bored for much of the book.

I still gave the book 3 stars since in parts it is interesting, and when it gets into a flow it did hold my interest and I really enjoyed it - but then it would just slam on the breaks with needless filler.

So in closing I'm not a fan of this book, it's not awful by any means, it's just dull and way too long with way too much filler. I love long history books WHEN they keep the story moving, this one just felt like an author trying to meet a word count and throwing in every detail they could find no matter how uninteresting it is.

The reader is OK, not bad, not good, just OK.

  • Stinker Lets Loose!

  • By: Mike Sacks, James Taylor Johnston
  • Narrated by: Jon Hamm, Eric Martin, Andy Richter, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 963
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 896
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 900

Mike has teamed up with director Eric Martin to adapt the novelization into a fully immersive cinematic audio experience, and an epic all-star cast has come together to introduce Stinker to a whole new generation of fans! It's Smokey and the Bandit meets Every Which Way But Loose meets Smokey and the Bandit Parts 2 and 3. Feel the thrill as Stinker teams up with old pals Boner and Jumbo, plus new friends Buck and Rascal the Chimp, for a crazy ride across the highways and byways of Bicentennial America.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Live performance at end is worth it!

  • By Frank on 02-23-18

Stinker does it again!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

I picked this up when Audible had it as a daily deal, so for that price it's well worth the money. I don't need to further explain what the book is since basically everyone else has done that, and it's exactly what it sounds like in the preview, it's a fun throwback to Smokey and the Bandit mixed with every other 70s trucker movie you can think of. The voice acting and production is well done.

The only negative is that the book itself is maybe 3 1/2 hours or so long, then it has some actors commentary for perhaps the last hour and a half or so. I really had no interest at all in what some voice actors thought about what they read, and I wasn't sure if the point was to act like it was a reunion from many years ago or them just patting themselves on the back, in either case I just hit stop and didn't listen since I just wanted the story of Stinker, not people pulling back the curtain on what I just heard.

The book is just good fun, something different as I listen almost exclusively to history and hate most fiction, but parodies of this genre, I enjoyed it.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Finder: The True Story of a Private Investigator

  • By: Marilyn Greene, Gary Provost
  • Narrated by: Sara K. Sheckells
  • Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19

In the last two decades, Private Investigator Marilyn Greene has found more than 200 people - sometimes discovering in hours or minutes a person missing for years. In Finder, Greene shares her news-making triumphs, the joyous family reunions she's made possible, and the chilling cases of dead ends. Often called in when all efforts by law enforcement officials have failed, she has traveled the country to locate runaways, children abducted by parents and strangers, and suicide and homicide victims.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A story about finding other people and yourself.

  • By cosmitron on 04-11-18

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-20-18

First, I got this book for free - however I have no issues bashing a book I got for free, go check my other reviews and you'll see that. Unlike others who seemingly give anything that is free a positive review, this review is legitimate and only written after having finished the entire book.

With that out of the way here's my take on the book.

It's a very good and enjoyable book and an easy read, if you read the description that is what you get. The book moves along at a quick pace so nothing ever gets dull. There's a family dynamic to everything as well to bridge the cases along, but it's not overdone. The book is well written, by no means a 5-star classic, but it's not an amatuer effort either.

What may or may not be a downside is that there isn't a lot in terms of in-depth detail on the cases. The author gives you ideas on how she conducted searches, etc, but it's by no means going to satisfy those that want a lot of details. But again this helps the book keep the pace up and not get dull, so to me, that wasn't an issue, but it is a note for those who are looking for that.

Also the book had me worried at the beginning as it starts off a bit like a social justice warrior essay, but since this was written in 1990 instead of 2018 it didn't linger on that aspect for too long and it setup the next part of the story. So just a heads up for those looking for SJW-free content.

The reader goes a good professional job. I generally listen to everything at 1.25x speed and the reader is very understandable at that speed, no pops, it's not too fast, etc. Just a comment for those that prefer that to 1x speed.

Overall I really enjoyed the book.

  • Everybody Is Awful

  • Except You!
  • By: Jim Norton - Foreword, Jim Florentine
  • Narrated by: Jim Norton - Foreword, Jim Florentine
  • Length: 7 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87

Twitter Trolls. Facebook Freaks. Instagram Exhibitionists. These are just a few of the creatures our technology-obsessed culture has spawned in its quest to simplify our lives. The madness is so universal now that everyone has dealt with it. You login to Facebook, read a stupid post, and immediately want to tell your "friend" to go have relations with himself. Thankfully, popular comedian and television host Jim Florentine has a solution for those of us on the verge of bashing our iPhones to bits.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book should be called “the newer testament”

  • By Katharine Mae Peck on 02-28-18

Great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

I share Florentine's disgust at these needy social media dullards and so I really enjoyed the book. Much of the original social media posts come from his podcasts, but the commentary on the posts is often different, more polished. It's a very entertaining read and the book flew by. Also Florentine did a great job as a narrator and thankfully he read it as I couldn't imagine anyone else doing this material and having the same level of disgust in their voice.