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  • Black Thursday

  • The Story of the Schweinfurt Raid
  • By: Martin Caidin
  • Narrated by: David Colacci
  • Length: 9 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38

On Thursday, October 14, 1943, 291 B-17 Flying Fortresses set out for a strategic bombing raid on the factories in Schweinfurt. Sixty of those planes never returned and 650 men were lost during the course of that mission. It was the greatest failure that the United States Air Force had ever suffered and became known as "Black Thursday". Martin Caidin's Black Thursday: The Story of the Schweinfurt Raid is a brilliant account of that day that should never be forgotten. This audiobook uncovers in thrilling detail the build-up to that fateful raid.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Best Look at Bomb Groups of the 8th

  • By Nicholas Robinson on 09-19-18

Style

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-08-18

On the one hand books written back in the 50s and 60s are excellent in that they tell the story of what happened without the PC garbage we get today, there are no artificial race and gender quotas to hit, which is fantastic. On the other hand history books written in this era often are just kind of boring and filled and with tons of cliches - and this book fits both of those descriptions. I love history books, but this one, ugh, it's tough to get through mainly because of the writing style. It's not a text book style of book, so in that regard it's good, but it's so filled with cliches it seemingly pads out the book length by at least twice. Also I hate history books that make up dialog to tell the story - and this book does just that.

The content is interesting and a few times the story really comes together and moves well, but then it's back to cliche after cliche after cliche to paint, then repaint, then repaint the scene again and it comes to a halt.

I can not recommend this book at all - it's not terrible, I just wouldn't recommend it. The glowing reviews I don't get - it's either people that love cliches or only know history books from what they make you read in school, and this is certainly a step up from those.

Also the reader here is very very slow. If you speed it up to 1.25x it sounds normal - but this is one of the rare books where you can go to 1.5x speed and have it sound almost normal - that's how slowly the reader speaks. Not a huge issue since you can speed it up, and don't even bother listening at 1x speed - try it at 1.25x speed and give it at least 5 mins, if you do so you'll know exactly what I mean.

  • Speer

  • Hitler's Architect
  • By: Martin Kitchen
  • Narrated by: Michael Page
  • Length: 19 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 10

In his best-selling autobiography, Albert Speer, Minister of Armaments and chief architect of Nazi Germany, repeatedly insisted he knew nothing of the genocidal crimes of Hitler's Third Reich. In this revealing new biography, author Martin Kitchen disputes Speer's lifelong assertions of ignorance and innocence, portraying a far darker figure who was deeply implicated in the appalling crimes committed by the regime he served so well. Kitchen reconstructs Speer's life with what we now know, including information from valuable new sources that have come to light only in recent years.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • End of book missing

  • By Douglas A. Brown on 05-02-18

Interesting, but extremely biased

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

Ideally when you write a history book you do so without opinion and let the story speak for itself. However the author in this case sets out with an agenda, to destroy the legacy that Speer built in the post war years, which is a shame since had he just told the story without injecting his opinion I think this book would be a lot more useful. Instead it comes off as a 19 hour rant a lot of the time and brings the story to a halt. However there isn't anything else in depth about Speer on Audible, so this will have to do. From that perspective you do learn quite a bit and the story is often interesting when the author isn't ranting. While you learn a lot about Speer the author also leaves out a ton, it's like he's writing a counter history to some other unknown book, and without that other half the book is incomplete. So this is worth checking out so long as you realize you're reading about 50% propaganda (or as I'm sure the author would say it's counter propaganda). Also the authors version of the economy under the National Socialists is pretty laughable, I've read hundreds of books on WW2 and have a pretty good grip on how things run, and his version of events is again very much the propaganda of a modern socalist. The author also feels the need to constantly give his opinion on architecture, which is pure opinion, but presented as facts.

So to sum it up most of the above is negative, and that's the opinion I was eventually left with, but it was still interesting in spots and I still learned quite a bit, even if it's incomplete.

The reader does an OK job, he has kind of an annoying and pompous voice, but listening at 1.25x speed makes things a lot more bearable.

  • Happy Endings

  • The Tales of a Meaty-Breasted Zilch
  • By: Jim Norton
  • Narrated by: Jim Norton
  • Length: 5 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 495
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 277

Comedian Jim Norton is dirty...really dirty...the kind of dirty that makes The Aristocrats look like a knock-knock joke. Fortunately for him, his kind of dirty humor has earned him the distinction of being third microphone on the immensely popular Opie & Anthony syndicated radio show. In Happy Endings, Jim brings his raw, hilarious, and offensively honest comedy to Audible® listeners.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Jim Uncensored

  • By christina onorio on 07-17-07

Still great

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

I bought this book when it first came out and enjoyed, however I hadn't read it since then so I picked it up as an audiobook and it's great, a really fun read. I was worried that it would be the same stories I've heard and while that is true to some extent, it's not nearly as repetitive as I was thinking it would be. If you like Norton, or you're an old O&A fan, you can't go here, you get over 5 hours of entertainment from Jimmy.

  • Killing the SS

  • By: Bill O'Reilly, Martin Dugard - contributor
  • Narrated by: Bill O'Reilly
  • Length: 7 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,368
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,246
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,235

As the true horrors of the Third Reich began to be exposed immediately after World War II, the Nazi war criminals who committed genocide went on the run. A few were soon caught, including the notorious SS leader Heinrich Himmler. Others, however, evaded capture through a sophisticated Nazi organization designed to hide them. Among them were Josef Mengele, the “Angel of Death” who performed hideous medical experiments at Auschwitz; Martin Bormann, Hitler’s brutal personal secretary; Klaus Barbie, the cruel "Butcher of Lyon"; and perhaps the most awful Nazi of all: Adolf Eichmann.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another great Killing book by O'Reilly & Dugard

  • By G. Kinzer on 10-11-18

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

While I knew some of the stories in here, I didn't know them all in any detail, and this was a good way to read those stories that do provide some detail but on events that might not be worthy of an entire book. This book is clearly meant for mass market consumption, meaning it's very easy to read (listen to) and moves at a quick pace, but doesn't cover anything in any deep depth that might lose the causal reader.

O'Reilly does a good job in his reading of the book, it sounds just like O'Reilly reading a book to you. Also while I generally listen to books at 1.25x speed, I found that a bit too quick in this case, so that 7 hours 24 mins is a legit time, you won't need to speed it up to keep it moving.

  • The Hitler I Knew

  • Memoirs of the Third Reich's Press Chief
  • By: Otto Dietrich
  • Narrated by: Eric Brooks
  • Length: 10 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 23

When Otto Dietrich was invited in 1933 to become Adolf Hitler's press chief, he accepted with the simple uncritical conviction that Adolf Hitler was a great man, dedicated to promoting peace and welfare for the German people. At the end of the war, imprisoned and disillusioned, Otto Dietrich sat down to write what he had seen and heard in 12 years of the closest association with Hitler, requesting that it be published after his death.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A hard review to write

  • By Alan on 04-26-14

Dull

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

This book starts out very slow, going over events you almost certainly already know if you've read any WW2 history at all. Finally after more than half of the book is over it finally starts to get a bit interesting as Dietrich begins telling stories about his interactions with Hitler, that's really the only part of the book that has any value. Also Dietrich clearly was infatuated by Hitler, and while he plays lip service to Hitler turning bad, I don't think for a moment he actually believes it.

The book isn't a total waste because of the few hours of stories and interactions that were new to me, but the rest of the book is a waste.

The narration was pretty awful. I ended up listening at 1.5x speed which make it tolerable - and for every other reader that would be too fast, but for this guy, it wasn't. Really poor job but not the worst I've heard, and keep in mind that speed playback button, it can make terrible readers like this tolerable.

  • Hitler

  • The Memoir of a Nazi Insider Who Turned Against the Fuhrer
  • By: Ernst Hanfstaengl
  • Narrated by: Robin Sachs
  • Length: 11 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 25

An intimate friend of Adolf Hitler’s who turned against him during the Nazi rise to power delves into the character of one of history’s most evil dictators. Of American and German parentage, Ernst Hanfstaengl graduated from Harvard and ran the family business in New York for a dozen years before returning to Germany in 1921. By chance he heard a then little-known Adolf Hitler speaking in a Munich beer hall and, mesmerized by his extraordinary oratorical power, was convinced the man would some day come to power. As Hitler’s fanatical theories and ideas hardened, however, he surrounded himself with rabid extremists...

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Once a Nazi, always a Nazi

  • By Alan on 04-10-13

Interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-18

This is a really interesting book that gives detail into Hitler from a different angle than what you usually get. Unlike other dopes who seem to think this is pro-Hitler, it's not and you have to be a real dullard who has never read history to think it is. However it's also not anti-Hitler read either, it's just the story of what he experienced and in that regard it's a useful piece of history. Hanfstaengl comes off like a trule upper class snob and you can tell his fellow NAZIs really never liked him since he was such a prompus suck up, but again, that is part of what makes the book interesting. Also the joke his fellow NAZIs play on him is pretty hilarious.

Overall I give this 5/5, it's a really interesting read involving lots of unlikeable people all vowing for Hitler's attention and approval, all told from a totally new point of view. The book is never boring and even if you've read hundreds of WW2 books, like myself, you're still going to learn something new.

Narration was fine. I always list at 1.25x or faster, and at that speed the narration was quite good.

  • Addicted to Outrage

  • By: Glenn Beck
  • Narrated by: Glenn Beck
  • Length: 15 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 475
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 444
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 441

In Addicted to Outrage, New York Times best-selling author Glenn Beck addresses how America has become more and more divided - both politically and socially. Americans are now less accepting, less forgiving, and have lost faith in many of the country's signature ideals. They are quick to point a judgmental finger at the opposing party, are unwilling to doubt their own ideologies, and refuse to have any self-awareness whatsoever. Beck states that this current downward spiral will ultimately lead to the destruction of everything America has fought so hard to preserve.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best Audible book ever!

  • By Cheryl on 09-21-18

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

This is Glenn's first book in years that I really enjoyed and would say is 5-stars. He addresses our biggest issue right now, and that is the fake outrage that sweeps through everything we do. Manufactured, meant to divide, meant to drive people into smaller and smaller subgroups so they need the protection of big government, it's a far left anti-western campaign to bring down our culture. Glenn deals with this in a very fair way, in fact I'd often say way too fair to the point of almost being passive in allowing lestist narratives to survive despite them having no grounds in reality. However I say ALMOST too far since the book isn't about surrendering or giving in, it's more about how to make points and how to get Democrats (not the far left nujobs, but your normal Dems) to realize what is happening. I'm not as sure as Glenn that these people exist in large numbers and will rebel and take their party back, but we shall see.

Anyways this book would be an excellent read for anyone that is trying to live and/or work with people on the left and want to know how to reach out to them in a way that they'll accept. This is not a red meat conservative book, it's as balanced as it can be for someone who is conservative, and it doesn't violate that belief system. Also it's an entertaining book, it's not boring or dry and doesn't lecture, it's Glenn doing what he does best, and that is telling stories.

Glenn also narrates the book and does a fantastic job, as you'd expect from someone that has done radio his entire life. This is not a straight boring read, it's done with emotion and humor, which is a very good thing. Also Glenn goes off script here and there, which is refreshing.

Overall this is a 5-star book and should be a must read for people that want to understand what is happening and how to read out to Democrats who haven't gone full alt-left yet. It should be must reading for anyone that considers themselves in the middle as well as Democrats who want to understand why there is such a rebellion against the SJW culture.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Briefing

  • Politics, the Press, and the President
  • By: Sean Spicer
  • Narrated by: Sean Spicer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 175
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157

For more than two decades, Sean Spicer had been a respected political insider, working as a campaign and communications strategist. But in December 2016, he got the call of a lifetime. President-elect Donald J. Trump had chosen him to be the White House press secretary. And life hasn’t been the same since. When he accepted the job, Spicer was far from a household name. But then he walked into the bright lights of the briefing room, and the cameras started rolling. His every word was scrutinized. Every movement was parodied. Every detail became a meme. And that’s just the public side.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • By Bobbie Lieggi on 08-24-18

Interesting

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

I heard Spicer making the rounds and he wasn't doing the typical generic politician deal, he wasn't bashing Trump but wasn't saying he's the greatest guy in the world either, he seemed to be telling his story and it sounded interesting, so I picked up the book fully expecting to refund if it was just a hack political book.

However it wasn't, it was quite an interesting and seemingly fair take on his time in the White House and how he got to his final destination. Also his take on the media should be a must read (listen) for the media, but of course they're so clueless and biased they'd just dismiss his comments without a second thought, then go back to printing DNC talking points as "news". His criticism on the media is more than just saying "fake news" and explains how DC works and why they have no interest in getting things right, and instead just play a big game of gotcha. I'm making it sound more biased than it actually is, but he does an excellent job explaining how things work and how the media purposely distorted stories. Also he explains the fit that the mainstream media through when he brought in local newspapers around the nation, made them part of his briefings, that was an extremely interesting part.

On the downside his tale of growing up and getting into politics just felt like padding. I pretty much universally hate early years in everyones biography, and this was no exception. The other criticism is that his time in the White House goes by too quickly, he should have gotten everything before the 2016 campaign out of the way in like 30 mins and spent the rest of time there, that would be my opinion.

Spicer reads the book himself and does a very good job - not 5 stars, that is reserved for very few, but just a notch below that, which is really good for a author reading his own book.

In closing it's a shame the media has basically ignored this. Had he bashed Trump you can be sure this would have sold millions of copies and he would have been on every show - but since he didn't bash Trump his media rounds was basically going on conservative radio/TV and that was about it. It's yet another indictment of how make the media and how anyone that doesn't follow their agenda doesn't have a voice.

  • Midnight in Peking

  • How the Murder of a Young Englishwoman Haunted the Last Days of Old China
  • By: Paul French
  • Narrated by: Erik Singer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 308
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 273
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 273

Peking in 1937 is a heady mix of privilege and scandal, opulence and opium dens, rumors and superstition. The Japanese are encircling the city, and the discovery of Pamela Werner's body sends a shiver through already nervous Peking. Is it the work of a madman? One of the ruthless Japanese soldiers now surrounding the city? With the suspect list growing and clues sparse, two detectives - one British and one Chinese - race against the clock to solve the crime before the Japanese invade and Peking as they know it is gone forever.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Old Murder Still Mysterious

  • By Helen on 06-05-12

Doesn't go anywhere

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-29-18

I love history and hate fiction, it's just a waste of time, whoever when history / nonfiction is at it's best it reads like a novel, just without wizards and peoples goblins and all that nonsense. Anywho a good murder mystery, that is based on real events, in a setting like this should be a homerun, but it's not. The author uses way too much conjecture for the story to have much in terms of credibility. Also the account of the book is taken from the father who isn't exactly an unbiased arbitrator of the truth. You get scenarios that are based on nothing, just the author making up something, it's not based on police reports or anything, and you have the flat ending, which I won't get into as to not spoil the book. Finally you have the author making up dialog, which again is based on nothing.

In closing this book reads like fiction, but not in a good way, in a way where much of the content is made up since it's not based on anything - and the parts that are based on something come from an extremely biased source. The more I write this review, the more I look at my 3-star rating and think I need to lower it to 2-stars, however I think I'll keep it at 3 since I wasn't exactly bored during the book and I made it to the end without a problem. But getting to the end, that was based on there being a big ending, the big reveal, and there wasn't one. Had I know the ending of the book there is no way I would have sat through it.

On the positive side I guess is the setting. It gives you a very generic overview of the time and setting but really doesn't use the setting for much. There are interesting characters in the book, so that is good, however I do wonder how much flavor is made up, either by the author or by the source. Also the book moves mostly at a good pace, so again, I wasn't bored.

The reader does a good job, gives a professional reading. As always I listen to audiobooks at 1.25x speed since it knocked over an hour and half off the listening time while not affecting my ability to follow everything in the least. If you don't listen at 1.25x speed, you should, it can make really bad readers tolerable, and can make mediocre readers seemingly have more range while not really taking away anything except for time.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Based on a True Story

  • A Memoir
  • By: Norm Macdonald
  • Narrated by: Norm Macdonald, Tim O'Halloran
  • Length: 7 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,035
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,802
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,791

As this book's title suggests, Norm Macdonald tells the story of his life - more or less - from his origins on a farm in the-back-of-beyond Canada and an epically disastrous appearance on Star Search to his account of auditioning for Lorne Michaels and his memorable run as the anchor of Weekend Update on Saturday Night Live - until he was fired because a corporate executive didn't think he was funny. But Based on a True Story is much more than a memoir; it's the hilarious, inspired epic of Norm's life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant!

  • By Cameron on 09-24-16

What a story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-20-18

I always thought of Norm as your typical Canadian, but boy was I wrong. In fact Norm has lead quite the life for a Canadian. Most Canadians prefer to live in trees surrounded by ice, but Norm wanted to come to America and become a big deal. This is his story, and it's quite the story, it involves sex, drugs and men dressed as women, oh and money, Norm likes money. If you like money, well this isn't the book for you since it cost money, but if you like some good old fashioned storytelling and you like to laugh, like a good hearty laugh, then you should exchange some of your money for this book.

The book is read by Norm who does a great job reading the words he wrote down.

Overall it's a 5-star book for a 5-star kind of guy.