LISTENER

Susan

  • 9
  • reviews
  • 39
  • helpful votes
  • 20
  • ratings
  • The Hidden Life of Trees

  • What They Feel, How They Communicate - Discoveries from a Secret World
  • By: Peter Wohlleben
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 7 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,723
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,420
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,406

How do trees live? Do they feel pain or have awareness of their surroundings? Research is now suggesting trees are capable of much more than we have ever known. In The Hidden Life of Trees, forester Peter Wohlleben puts groundbreaking scientific discoveries into a language everyone can relate to.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • As I suspected all along...

  • By Janning on 12-26-16

New !

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-12-18

I gobble up science books written for the lay person. After a while one science book can seem an awful lot like another. This one is all new to me. Additionally it is thoughtfully read and presented.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Educated

  • A Memoir
  • By: Tara Westover
  • Narrated by: Julia Whelan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 40,459
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 36,623
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 36,457

Tara Westover was 17 the first time she set foot in a classroom. Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, she prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling home-canned peaches. In the summer she stewed herbs for her mother, a midwife and healer, and in the winter she salvaged in her father's junkyard. Her father forbade hospitals, so Tara never saw a doctor or nurse. Gashes and concussions, even burns from explosions, were all treated at home with herbalism. Then, lacking any formal education, Tara began to educate herself. Her quest for knowledge transformed her.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The Other Side of Idaho's Mountains

  • By Darwin8u on 03-28-18

Tara Westover educated me

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-18

Tara Westover makes the most convincing argument for a liberal arts education I have yet to hear. She does it while telling us how she became educated. I love a good memoir and this is one of the best. However it's more than a coming of age story in which the author succeeds despite seemingly unsurmountable obstacles. If you don't have time to read this book just read the last chapter.

  • Moonwalking with Einstein

  • The Art and Science of Remembering Everything
  • By: Joshua Foer
  • Narrated by: Mike Chamberlain
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,666
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,934
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,926

Foer's unlikely journey from chronically forgetful science journalist to U.S. Memory Champion frames a revelatory exploration of the vast, hidden impact of memory on every aspect of our lives. On average, people squander forty days annually compensating for things they've forgotten. Joshua Foer used to be one of those people. But after a year of memory training, he found himself in the finals of the U.S. Memory Championship. Even more important, Foer found a vital truth we too often forget.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Got the Ball Rolling

  • By Christopher on 03-17-11

Now that you've broken my heart

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-07-18

Now are you that you've broken my heart and left me with egg on my face I feel like a real chump. Let me explain. I've been a Daniel Tammet fan. I love the idea of him calculating pi to infinitum. His description of himself as able to see pi shimmering like a sublime numerical landscape or off of a shy and awkward lad teaching English to Polish ladies is giving way to an image of a slightly geeky guy who really wants to live nicely and has found a good way to do it. Well that's not really so bad. It's just not that romantic. Also I now know that I can improve my memory. All I have to do is all the work. Aargh!

  • A Division of the Spoils

  • The Raj Quartet, Book 4
  • By: Paul Scott
  • Narrated by: Richard Brown
  • Length: 28 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59

After exploiting India's divisions for years, the British depart in such haste that no one is prepared for the Hindu-Muslim riots of 1947.

Against the backdrop of the violent partition of India and Pakistan, this volume sketches one last bittersweet romance, revealing the divided loyalties of the British as they flee, retreat from, or cling to India.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A long story

  • By Susan on 09-25-16

A long story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-16

Sometimes a long story it's just what's needed. I was sorry with the story ended. I miss it now. One unsolved mystery remains: how on earth did the English ever smoke and drink so much?

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Cleopatra

  • A Life
  • By: Stacy Schiff
  • Narrated by: Robin Miles
  • Length: 14 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,102
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 670
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 685

Her palace shimmered with onyx, garnets, and gold, but was richer still in political and sexual intrigue. Above all else, Cleopatra was a shrewd strategist and an ingenious negotiator. Though her life spanned fewer than 40 years, it reshaped the contours of the ancient world. Cleopatra appears to have had sex with only two men. They happen, however, to have been Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A pretty good listen.

  • By Shaun on 04-21-11

Better then the movie

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-16

Stacy Schiff creates a coherent story pulled from shards of text. I love the authors diligence and appreciate the way she connects the dots turning a legend steeped in history into history as compelling as myth. Cleopatra, and her avatar, Elizabeth, Taylor equal one another in drama and splendor.

  • The Hidden Half of Nature

  • The Microbial Roots of Life and Health
  • By: David R. Montgomery, Anne Bikle
  • Narrated by: LJ Ganser
  • Length: 10 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 421
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 373
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 374

A riveting exploration of how microbes are transforming the way we see nature and ourselves - and could revolutionize agriculture and medicine. Prepare to set aside what you think you know about yourself and microbes. Good health - for people and for plants - depends on Earth's smallest creatures. The Hidden Half of Nature tells the story of our tangled relationship with microbes and their potential to revolutionize agriculture and medicine, from garden to gut.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A perfect introduction to microbiology

  • By Ary Shalizi on 02-17-17

It's OK

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-16

Here is another book about the value of natural gardening filled with fun facts and insightful ideas regarding nutrition and the evils of factory farming.

The books tone is somewhat marred by the narrators overly incredulous expression. His voice also runs cynical on occasion. In short he is an annoying narrator. The book appears to be written by husband-and-wife however the narrator never makes it clear who is doing which writing.

Regarding the writing, it's OK,not great. The male writer has a condescending manner, something along the lines of, "can you believe my crazy wife was really right about organic compost! "

That's just plain silly. Anybody reading this book is already convinced that organic gardening is a good thing. Nevertheless and in spite of everything I've complained about it's a pretty good story.

19 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Nirvana: the Last Nightmare

  • Learning to Trust in Life
  • By: Osho
  • Narrated by: Osho
  • Length: 15 hrs and 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 22
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21

Nirvana has become an idealized word associated with the juxtaposition of a cult rock celebrity who died before his time and a vague new age version of Eastern religion. An altered state to be hoped for but likely unattainable, reinforcing that all too familiar uneasiness associated with never being able to have what we truly desire in life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The book for a new Humanity

  • By Cletycat on 03-13-16

Distracting background sounds

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-08-16

This production was unfortunate. I could not concentrate on the readers voice. He spoke in soft new age tones. This annoyed me. To make matters worse his voice was drowned out by the background noise production, vaguely naturalistic sounds reminiscent of rain on the roof and birds tweets.

1 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Silk Roads

  • A New History of the World
  • By: Peter Frankopan
  • Narrated by: Laurence Kennedy
  • Length: 24 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,852
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,658
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,657

It was on the Silk Roads that East and West first encountered each other through trade and conquest, leading to the spread of ideas, cultures, and religions, and it was the appetites for foreign goods that drove economies and the growth of nations. From the first cities in Mesopotamia to the emergence of Greece and Rome to the depredations by the Mongols, the transmission of the Black Death, the struggles of the Great Game, and the fall of Communism - the fate of the West has always been inextricably linked to the East.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What Really Makes the World Go Round

  • By Mom in Santa Fe on 07-29-16

Points of view

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-16

Loved this book. I am always searching for different points of view regarding the development of the world as we experience it now. This book does a good job presenting familiar information from an unfamiliar vantage point. Loved the story. The presentation was OK. It did not stand out especially good or bad.

17 of 20 people found this review helpful

  • Flowers in the Blood

  • The Story of Opium
  • By: Jeff Goldberg, Dean Latimer, William Burroughs (introduction)
  • Narrated by: Stephen McLaughlin
  • Length: 12 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

Opium has played a dramatic and varied role in human history, inspiring religious veneration, scientific exploration, the bitterest rancor, and the most fanciful ecstasy. Now, authors Jeff Goldberg and Dean Latimer have provided a complete, insightful history of opium. Flowers in the Blood lifts the veil of mystery that has surrounded opium down through the ages.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • OPIATE DECRIMINALIZATION

  • By CHET YARBROUGH on 06-18-14

Some Things Never Change

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-11-16

This book might also be entitled 'History of the War on Drugs'. It's about legal and illegal drug trade, medically sanctioned drug use and recreational drug use.
Though the author details the politic and commercial circumstances that led to the opium wars in China in the 1800s he doesn't stop there. The book follows the opium trade through the 1960s, especially relevant in light of the current epidemic of new heroin addicts.
As successful traders have learned to repackage opium into more potent and more marketable morphine and heroin, science remains stymied in its attempt to understand and cure addiction.
The author takes us to opium dens in China, to respectable Victorian homes replete with Laudemun, to the fringes of modern urban America where addicts shiver under bridges.
He makes his point, addiction has remained constant and intractable, an old story with no end in sight.



1 of 1 people found this review helpful