LISTENER

Marjee

Washington DC
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 63
  • helpful votes
  • 17
  • ratings
  • Peoples and Cultures of the World

  • By: Edward Fischer, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Edward Fischer
  • Length: 12 hrs and 8 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 159
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 134
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 132

As the "science of humanity," anthropology can help us understand virtually anything about ourselves, from our political and economic systems, to why we get married, to how we decide to buy a particular bottle of wine. This 24-lecture course reveals the extraordinary power of anthropology - and its subspecialty, cultural anthropology - as a tool to understand the world's varied human societies, including our own.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • The world is not only made of tribes

  • By Anonymous User on 11-19-14

Great refresher

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-14

I've skimmed many of the topics covered in this lecture during my graduate school days, but Professor Fischer's passion for this topic enhanced my understanding of the cultures mentioned here and his framing of Anthropology as a discipline added enormously to my understanding of the subject matter. Listening to this course gave me exactly what I had hoped for: a fascinating, globe-trotting escape into the lives of other people I will never meet and an opportunity to marvel at our shared, human experiences.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Food: A Cultural Culinary History

  • By: Ken Albala, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Ken Albala
  • Length: 18 hrs and 22 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,020
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,724
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,694

Eating is an indispensable human activity. As a result, whether we realize it or not, the drive to obtain food has been a major catalyst across all of history, from prehistoric times to the present. Epicure Jean-Anthelme Brillat-Savarin said it best: "Gastronomy governs the whole life of man."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • One of my top 3 favorite courses!

  • By Jessica on 12-28-13

What an enjoyable lecture

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-19-14

I'm a vegetarian and a foodie and I adored this course. There are so many connections Albala made that I had wondered about before. For instance, I've noticed that preparing Middle Eastern cuisine uses many of the same spices I'll pull out for when we're making Mexican food. I *just* made the connection that this has so much to do with the Arab presence in Spain. I also loved learning about the changes in diet and cooking habits from the time of ancient Greece throughout the Middle Ages and thinking about cuisines I don't normally think about, like what the Vikings ate and where in the world those foods persist.

This lecture is a blast and I've already started to re-listen to it and use what I've learned to regale colleagues and make small talk at parties. If you love food and enjoy cooking, you'll love this one!

29 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • Horns

  • A Novel
  • By: Joe Hill
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,024
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,418
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,435

Ignatius Perrish spent the night drunk and doing terrible things. He woke up the next morning with a thunderous hangover, a raging headache, and a pair of horns growing from his temples. At first Ig thought the horns were a hallucination, the product of a mind damaged by rage and grief. He had spent the last year in a lonely, private purgatory, following the death of his beloved, Merrin Williams, who was raped and murdered under inexplicable circumstances.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Started out good, BUT...

  • By Randall on 06-06-18

Great story, writing is rough around the edges

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-23-13

I really enjoyed this story and was eager to get back to listening to it. It is a great premise. I love a good sympathy for the devil story. That said:

1) I only tolerated the narrator. Maybe it was the director's fault. His reading of the protagonist's lines didn't resonate with what we know about Ig. Ig is kind of a big wimp, and nothing makes him seem otherwise, except for the narrator's intonation. The acting didn't match the writing.
2) Hill is a better storyteller than he is a writer. He is still early in his career and I want to read more by him, but he was often too "on the nose."
3) I didn't like any of the characters to really root for them. Sometimes that is OK in a book, but with this book, everyone was so terrible that I wanted someone, anyone, to be vaguely likeable.

Those are a few caveats about what was ultimately a fun listening experience.

11 of 54 people found this review helpful

The Great Gatsby
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        F. Scott Fitzgerald
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Tim Robbins
    
    


    
    Length: 5 hrs and 44 mins
    1,728 ratings
    Overall 4.1
  • The Great Gatsby

  • By: F. Scott Fitzgerald
  • Narrated by: Tim Robbins
  • Length: 5 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,728
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,095
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,109

The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald's portrait of the Jazz Age in all its decadence and excess, is, as editor Maxwell Perkins praised it in 1924, "a wonder". It remains one of the most widely read, translated, admired, imitated, and studied 20th-century works of American fiction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Something you won't fall asleep to...

  • By Mrs. Jewell on 01-18-05

Tim Robbins was amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-07-13

There isn't much to say regarding the content here as this is America's novel for the 20th Century. I did want to mention that Tim Robbins was one of the only male narrators that totally pulled off reading as a women. There have been a few narrators where it was really hard to take the falsetto, but Robbins managed to be endearing through and through. Even if you've read Gatsby several times, I recommend listening to Robbins' performance.

  • How to Win Friends & Influence People

  • By: Dale Carnegie
  • Narrated by: Andrew MacMillan
  • Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 59,339
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 47,038
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46,709

You can go after the job you want...and get it! You can take the job you have...and improve it! You can take any situation you're in...and make it work for you!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This is well worth listening too! Main points are.

  • By Ralph on 10-21-11

Pleasant company on a business trip

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-12

Not much to add to others' rave reviews. This is a classic for a reason, after all. I had this with me on a recent business trip. It was a pretty intense one, with tons of meetings, red-eye flights, and I'm a nervous flier as it is. Both Carnegie and MacMillan were wonderfully reassuring and empowering in every way. I'm sure I'll revisit this file often.

  • The Middlesteins

  • A Novel
  • By: Jami Attenberg
  • Narrated by: Molly Ringwald
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 305
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 266

For more than 30 years, Edie and Richard Middlestein shared a solid family life together in the suburbs of Chicago. But now things are splintering apart, for one reason, it seems: Edie's enormous girth. She's obsessed with food - thinking about it, eating it - and if she doesn't stop, she won't have much longer to live. When Richard abandons his wife, it is up to the next generation to take control. With pitch-perfect prose, huge compassion, and sly humor, Jami Attenberg has given us an epic story of marriage, family, and obsession.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Ended too soon

  • By Marjee on 10-31-12

Ended too soon

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-12

I heard this book reviewed on NPR and was happy to see that it was available on Audible. The NPR review mentioned Attenberg's unflinchingly honest character portrayals and that piqued my interest. During several of the first chapters, I wasn't sure if I really liked the book, or if I was easily delighted by the amazingly accurate portrayal of life on the North side of the Chicago metro area. I'm originally from there, and the detail the author paints on that setting is so realistic, I felt like I was home for the holidays.

But as I got to the end of the book, I can confirm that it was the story in its entirety that charmed me. To be sure, I was left wanting so much more. It felt like it ended too soon, I wanted to know so much more about the characters past and present. That is bad news for me, but a credit to the author. Speaking of credits, I usually download really long tomes to get my credit worth in Audible, so this was an usually short book for me.

Ringwald did a nice job narrating. She was a little bit stilted at times, but it did not interfere with my enjoyment of this book and the sound of her voice likely contributed to the overall nostalgia I experienced visiting Superdogs on Milwaukee, Wicker Park, and Polish nail salons in Skokie.

13 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • The Robber Bride

  • By: Margaret Atwood
  • Narrated by: Bernadette Dunne
  • Length: 20 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 470
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 419
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 422

Margaret Atwood's The Robber Bride is inspired by "The Robber Bridegroom", a wonderfully grisly tale from the Brothers Grimm in which an evil groom lures three maidens into his lair and devours them, one by one. But in her version, Atwood brilliantly recasts the monster as Zenia, a villainess of demonic proportions, and sets her loose in the lives of three friends.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Captivating Story with Great Narration

  • By Mariah on 05-21-13

Surprisingly enjoyable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-12

What made the experience of listening to The Robber Bride the most enjoyable?

I went outside of my comfort zone with this book. It was turned into a Lifetime movie, definitely not my thing. But it was so much fun! I really cared about the characters and could not wait to hear more as their individual mysteries unraveled.

Who was your favorite character and why?

All three protagonists were wonderful in their own way.

Have you listened to any of Bernadette Dunne’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not heard Ms. Dunne read before, but I really enjoyed her. I forgot I was listening to a single person, but she wasn't over the top. Pretty flawless.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Absolutely, I was antisocial during this story. I had my ear phones in all the time.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Bonfire of the Vanities

  • By: Tom Wolfe
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 27 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,972
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,361
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,357

Tom Wolfe's best-selling modern classic tells the story of Sherman McCoy, an elite Wall Street bond trader who has it all: wealth, power, prestige, a Park Avenue apartment, a beautiful wife, and an even more beautiful mistress - until one wrong turn sends Sherman spiraling downward into a humiliating fall from grace. A car accident in the Bronx involving Sherman, his girlfriend, and two young lower-class black men sets a match to the incendiary racial and social tensions of 1980s New York City.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • TEN STARS

  • By JOHN on 08-23-09

Timely story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-12

Where does The Bonfire of the Vanities rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This was a riveting story about terrible people. This is my first Wolfe and it won't be my last. The portraits of his characters are among the most vividly rendered I can recall any author pulling off. The narrator was quite skilled in pulling off the accents. His weakness was little Campbell, he sounded kind of crazy voicing a little girl, but that is an infrequent issue.

Who was your favorite character and why?

They are all terrible people, let's be honest. Even little Campbell was annoying. Anyway, that is the fun of the book!

Which scene was your favorite?

The society dinner party was a great opportunity to peak at and giggle at how the

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I happened to be listening to the story when there was a very similar story dominating the news. It is interesting how little has changed in the 20+ years since Wolfe wrote the book.