LISTENER

SunshineAndRain

San Diego
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 14
  • helpful votes
  • 8
  • ratings
  • Do More Faster

  • TechStars Lessons to Accelerate Your Startup
  • By: Brad Feld, David Cohen
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 7 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 493
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 408
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 410

It is a cold, hard fact of business life that most startups fail. Even many of those entrepreneurs who ultimately succeed have stories of personal challenges, unsuccessful companies, and difficulties along the way. The founders of TechStars, a mentorship-driven startup accelerator, have worked with entrepreneurs and companies over the past twenty-five years, and have seen a number of the same issues come up again and again.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tips for Every Entrepreneur

  • By SunshineAndRain on 08-30-12

Tips for Every Entrepreneur

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-12

The authors of this book run a well-respected program for high tech entrepreneurs, but even if you're a not a software person, the tips in this book about starting, running, and planning a business are extremely valuable. So many of the chapters stick with me months after I listened, especially "fail fast." Some tips are complex and structural for how to set up a business. Other tips are light such as "don't suck at e-mail." A great education.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Inside Out and Back Again

  • By: Thanhha Lai
  • Narrated by: Doan Ly
  • Length: 2 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 246
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 248

Written in rich, free-verse poems, this moving tale follows a young Vietnamese girl as she leaves her war-torn homeland for America in 1975. With Saigon about to fall to the communists, 10-year-old Hà, her mother, and brothers are forced to flee their beloved city and head to the United States. But living in a new country isn’t easy for Hà, and she finds adapting to its strange customs ever challenging.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The experience of a refugee in America

  • By SunshineAndRain on 07-24-12

The experience of a refugee in America

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-12

What made the experience of listening to Inside Out and Back Again the most enjoyable?

Many students in the United States know the pain and loneliness of being the “new kid” at a school. But most Americans move from one city to another, or one state to another—not one country to another, and one culture to another. But reading allows children to learn about experience they’ve never had. And really good books allow children to feel the feelings described. Inside Out And Back Again is one of those tales. One can’t read it without changing as a person because the reader truly feels the feelings of Ha, the main character.

The story begins in Saigon, Viet Nam just before the city falls in the early 1970’s. Ha, her mother and brothers flee the country and are sponsored by an American family in Alabama. The first half of the story takes place in Viet Nam and the second half takes place in the US.

What did you like best about this story?

Ha goes through are real human emotions as she navigates the types of things all kids must endure when they are thrust into a new situation, only Ha experiences them a much greater extreme.

This is a wonderful story, well written, emotionally tight. Fifth through seventh graders will enjoy it.

Who was the most memorable character of Inside Out and Back Again and why?

Ha suffers the prejudice and crulty of the children at her school. She suffers the confusion of not knowing the language. And she muddles through the difficulties of having to eat unfamiliar foods and missing the treats she enjoyed in her native land. She also experiences the kindness of neighbors and learns the wonder of building new friendships.


6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Heart of a Samurai

  • By: Margi Preus
  • Narrated by: James Yaegashi
  • Length: 6 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 97
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82

Praised as “a timeless tale” by Booklist in a starred review, this Newbery Honor book by Margi Preus explores the cultural divide between the East and West circa 1841. When Manjiro, a Japanese teenager, is thrown from his fishing boat during a storm, he’s rescued by an American whaling ship. Befriending the ship’s captain, Manjiro decides to travel with the crew to Massachusetts. But years later, when Manjiro attempts to return to his homeland, he’s imprisoned as an outsider

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful !

  • By Kimberly on 02-21-16

A story with heart and history

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-12

Would you listen to Heart of a Samurai again? Why?

What do Moby Dick and Edo-era Japan have in common and why should you care? The two eras overlap in the incredibly well-written and engulfing story by Margi Preus, Heart of A Samurai.

The story opens in the mid 1800’s. Manjiro is a young fisherman whose boat is wrecked somewhere off the coast of Japan. At the time, Japan was a fully closed society. Citizens had no contact with other nations, and if they did, they’d be excommunicated and banned from returning.

Stuck on a rock with little food and water, Manjiro and his mates are discovered by a whaling boat from New Bedford, Massachusetts. They spend several months on this boat as men on whaling hunts (a la Moby Dick).

Who was your favorite character and why?

Manjiro is the sole member of the Japanese fishing team who learns English. Despite the fact that his culture has taught him to think of Westerners as devils, he begins to believe in the American Dream and chooses to go back with the whalers to Massachusetts when the others are dropped off in the Sandwich Islands (known now as Hawaii).

Any additional comments?

Heart of A Samuari is about the tug-of-war between following one's dreams, while yearning for the security. This is the classic crisis that all children can relate to: who doesn't want to be themselves, follow their desires, and to uncharted territories—while also wanting the comforts of family and familiar customs. Which one should you choose when you can only choose one?

This story is well written and engulfing and provides realistic historical references as well.

Highly recommended, a Newbery Honor Book.

  • A Discourse on Method

  • Meditations on the First Philosophy: Principles of Philosophy
  • By: René Descartes
  • Narrated by: James Adams
  • Length: 8 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 92
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 69
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71

By calling everything into doubt, Descartes laid the foundations of modern philosophy. With the celebrated words "I think therefore I am," his compelling argument swept aside ancient and medieval traditions. He deduced that human beings consist of minds and bodies; that these are totally distinct "substances"; that God exists and that He ensures we can trust the evidence of our senses.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Dense historic document

  • By Vinicius Moreira on 05-14-11

A classic, old syntax and all

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-12

What did you like best about A Discourse on Method? What did you like least?

This is the real deal, Descartes' "I think therefore I am" masterpiece. Be forewarned it contains old fashioned syntax and an even more old fashioned view of the world. If you want to listen to this seminal philosophical work, it's all here.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Changing the Game

  • How Video Games are Transforming the Future of Business
  • By: David Edery, Ethan Mollick
  • Narrated by: Stow Lovejoy
  • Length: 6 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 135
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 55

Changing the Game reveals how leading-edge organizations are using video games to reach new customers more cost-effectively; to build brands; to recruit, develop, and retain great employees; to drive more effective experimentation and innovation; to supercharge productivity...in short, to make it fun to do business.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Informative, useful book on games and business

  • By Lilach on 11-19-08

Interesting but sort of old news in 2012

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-12

Would you say that listening to this book was time well-spent? Why or why not?

Very insightful, clearly the authors are experts in their field. The examples are fairly old by 2012 however. For example it talks about "Second Life" as an up-and-coming phenomenon.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Update with new examples.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • What Every BODY Is Saying

  • An Ex-FBI Agent’s Guide to Speed-Reading People
  • By: Joe Navarro, Marvin Karlins
  • Narrated by: Paul Costanzo
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,318
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,684
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,661

Listen to this book and send your nonverbal intelligence soaring. Joe Navarro, a former FBI counterintelligence officer and a recognized expert on nonverbal behavior, explains how to "speed-read" people: decode sentiments and behaviors, avoid hidden pitfalls, and look for deceptive behaviors. You'll also learn how your body language can influence what your boss, family, friends, and strangers think of you.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Let Me Hear Your Body Talk

  • By Cynthia on 07-06-13

Fairly superficial mostly about lying

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-20-12

Is there anything you would change about this book?

I was curious to learn something new about perceiving the people around me by their body movements. This books is mostly about how to tell if someone is lying, but there is a lot of other behavior I was curious about that this book didn't cover. I felt overall the book was superficial.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

More about how to perceive a larger range of behaviors.