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Carl

Stamford, Ct, United States
  • 13
  • reviews
  • 109
  • helpful votes
  • 64
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  • Beautiful Creatures

  • Beautiful Creatures, Book 1
  • By: Kami Garcia, Margaret Stohl
  • Narrated by: Kevin T. Collins
  • Length: 17 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,836
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,148
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,186

Lena Duchannes is unlike anyone the small Southern town of Gatlin has ever seen, and she's struggling to conceal her power and a curse that has haunted her family for generations. Ethan Wate, who has been counting the months until he can escape from Gatlin, is haunted by dreams of a beautiful girl he has never met. When Lena moves into the town's oldest and most infamous plantation, Ethan is inexplicably drawn to her and determined to uncover the connection between them.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • warmed over young adult supernatural fiction

  • By BumbleBee 456 on 12-27-12

Crossover appeal for adults?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-12

This performances and presentation for this book were very well done.

The storyline will be appealing to "Twilight" crowd but I'm not sure how or why this could have crossover appeal for adults (as, say the Harry Potter series seems to have). I don't know how this got such high ratings. It's so superficial and shallow I could barely get through it.

The plot is basic, the characters are 1-dimentional, the dialogue is inane teenage chatter that never touches on subjects more profound than the desiree to fit in, get a boyfriend, or gain independance. Descriptions of characters are repetitive; each insight or description just reinforces what we already know about the characters and the travails of High School in a rural town.

Overall, this is unrewarding fluff written for a 6th grade reading level. That said, teenagers will probably have fun with it.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

A Feast for Crows audiobook cover art
  • A Feast for Crows

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 31 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 4,638
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,846
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,870

It is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising faces, some familiar, others only just appearing, are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • No Roy Dotrice

  • By Aaron on 12-07-05

Decent story in the series, bad performance

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-11

Yes, the performance is annoying. Every sentence is overly flamboyant; if you stress every other word than everything loses importance.

John Lee pronounces "Wh" like Stewey on "Family Guy"... Wheat = Hooweat, white = haawhite, weasel = hawweasel

  • A Game of Thrones

  • A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 1
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Roy Dotrice
  • Length: 33 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95,392
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 82,336
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 82,275

In a time long forgotten, a preternatural event threw the seasons off balance. In a land where summers can last decades and winters a lifetime, trouble is brewing. As the cold returns, sinister forces are massing beyond the protective wall of the kingdom of Winterfell. To the south, the king's powers are failing, with his most trusted advisor mysteriously dead and enemies emerging from the throne's shadow.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Review of First 5 Books

  • By DCinMI on 09-12-13

Complex and excellent, very absorbing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-11

If you could sum up A Game of Thrones in three words, what would they be?

Like Medieval Sopranos

What did you like best about this story?

It's long, complex, has multiple story-lines, convincing characters and plot, excellent environmental descriptions, good backstories, and a plot that hangs together perfectly and believably. It's hard to believe one person wrote this.

Have you listened to any of Roy Dotrice???s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have not. But I enjoyed his performance greatly. He has a great, elderly sounding voice that goes well with the subject, and he doesn't try to do (or overdo) female voices, which to me can be quite creepy.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Well, see the HBO series, it's a scene for scene reproduction of the book, and very good.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Angels and Ages

  • A Short Book About Darwin, Lincoln, and Modern Life
  • By: Adam Gopnik
  • Narrated by: Adam Gopnik
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 34

Written 200 years after Charles Darwin and Abraham Lincoln shared a birthday on February 12, 1809, this insightful account sheds new light on two men who changed the way we think about the meaning of life and death. Award-winning journalist Adam Gopnik's unique perspective, combined with previously unexplored stories and figures, reveals two men planted firmly at the roots of modern views and liberal values.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Connecting Darwin and Lincoln

  • By Joshua Kim on 06-10-12

Much about writing style.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-11

This book is not so much a historical account. It compares and contrasts the writing style, logical and rhetorical strategies, and their overall ways of seeing the world.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Freakonomics

  • Revised Edition
  • By: Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J. Dubner
  • Narrated by: Stephen J. Dubner
  • Length: 6 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,454
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,318
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,317

Steven D. Levitt is not a typical economist. He is a much-heralded scholar who studies the riddles of everyday life, from cheating and crime to sports and child-rearing, and whose conclusions turn the conventional wisdom on its head. Thus the new field of study contained in this audiobook: Freakonomics. Levitt and co-author Stephen J. Dubner show that economics is, at root, the study of incentives: how people get what they want, or need, especially when other people want or need the same thing.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good, but be careful

  • By Shackleton on 07-03-08

Easy read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-11

This is a compelling book, but it will offend many. Race is dealt with quite a bit, and is pretty hard on blacks. We get mostly conclusions, and little of the data and methodology. Some conclusions are based on assumptions.


For example, they say that adoption correlates to lower success. If the data proves that, fine. But when they conclude that this must be because "The type of person to give up a baby for adoption tends to have a lower IQ"... I think this is an ASSUMPTION that can't possibly be supported by data, given that most adoptions are closed. How do they know the IQ of the mothers?

The idea that crime fell off precipitously in the 90's because of abortion is compelling but I see some flaws. They ASSUME that the unwanted, aborted babies were the most likely babies to have become criminals. At the same time they fall heavily on the nature side in the nature vs nurture debate (I agree) and imply that intelligent, successful parents tend to produce the same sort of children. So, who is really having all the abortions? Unintelligent and uneducated women, or upwardly mobile women that don't want impediments to careers and education? If the majority are in the latter group, couldn't it be argued that those kids would have been LESS likely to be criminals? Where is the data on this? I'm sure it's out there but not mentioned in the book. Also, what about all the aborted children that were essentially replaced by the children of immigrants? There has been no precipitous drop in population in America, unlike, say Italy, despite abortion and contraception because of immigration, correct? So, they must be saying that there's not a drop in teenagers, but just a drop in BAD teenagers, and I don;t see how this has been proven.

They sometimes cite hypothetical and anecdotal cases which are purely imaginary.

Despite these shortcomings, it was a fun read with interesting ideas. I just wouldn't take some of their conclusions as gospel.

29 of 31 people found this review helpful

  • Six Armies in Normandy

  • From D-Day to the Liberation of Paris
  • By: John Keegan
  • Narrated by: Fred Williams
  • Length: 17 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 130
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53

In a burnished, driving prose, incorporating a myriad of fresh sources, John Keegan tells the story of the Allies' greatest military achievement as he chronicles the 1944 invasion of Normandy, from D-Day to the liberation of Paris.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not for the casual WWII reader

  • By Jay on 12-13-05

Great Narration and Story, poor compresion

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-01-10

Enjoying the book very much except that it sounds like someone is talking in the background, some kind of compression artifact?

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Blood of the Fold

  • Sword of Truth, Book 3
  • By: Terry Goodkind
  • Narrated by: Buck Schirner
  • Length: 22 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,824
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,535
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,550

In a fantasy world as rich and real as our own, Richard Rahl and Kahlan Amnell stand against the ancient forces which besiege the New World - forces so terrible that when last they threatened, they could only be withstood by sealing off the Old World from whence they came. Now the barrier has been breached, and the New World is again beset by their evil power.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Narrator... From bad to worse in this book

  • By Jim on 09-26-09

narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-09

The book was fine but the narrator was not so good.

12 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Stone of Tears

  • Sword of Truth, Book 2
  • By: Terry Goodkind
  • Narrated by: Jim Bond
  • Length: 38 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,516
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 5,956
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,988

The veil to the underworld has been torn, and Rahl, from beyond the veil, begins to summon a sinister power more dreadful than any he has wielded before. Horrifying creatures escape through the torn veil, wreaking havoc on the unsuspecting world above.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Book - Almost ruined by the narrator

  • By Bo Laughlin on 05-12-10

Why do a different narrater for every book?

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-09

This narrator was not nearly as good for me as for the first book. At first I thought the book was allot cornier than than the first, and maybe less well written. This may or may not be true, but much of that impression comes from the narrator. His timing and execution is robotic and somehow childish.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Wizard's First Rule

  • Sword of Truth, Book 1
  • By: Terry Goodkind
  • Narrated by: Sam Tsoutsouvas
  • Length: 34 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,905
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,676
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,737

In the aftermath of the brutal murder of his father, Richard Cypher encounters a mysterious woman, Kahlan Amnell, in his forest sanctuary. She seeks his help...and more. His world, his very beliefs, are shattered when ancient debts come due with thundering violence.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This book is a blast

  • By Jim "The Impatient" on 05-09-12

Great Narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-06-09

The narration for this book was much, much better than for book 2, Sam T is better talent. Overall, a great value if you use credits 1 credit = 35 hours of fun. Even though it's a cheesy fantasy book, it's very well written. Much darker and more violent than the TV series.

  • Song of Susannah

  • The Dark Tower VI
  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 14 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,091
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,864
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,896

The next-to-last novel in Stephen King's seven-volume magnum opus, Song of Susannah is a fascinating key to the unfolding mystery of the Dark Tower.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Kool-Ade, Drunk.

  • By Grant on 05-29-13

Last part of series not so good

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-22-08

Overall, with the Gold plan this series was a great buy, I saved at least $100 over the itunes price and got over 100 hours of listening. Great value.

This, for me, was the worst book in the series. Stephen King writing himself into the series ruined it for me because it messed up my suspension of disbelief. It's hard to care about characters that even the narrative imples are not "real".

It's true, as others have noted, that there is too much introspection in this book, and the plot plods along slowly. I don't mind that so many new types of characters were added.

The last book redeems the latter part of the series somewhat for me, but it was downhill for me as soon as SK added himself to the book.


12 of 15 people found this review helpful