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  • You Don't Have to Say You Love Me

  • A Memoir
  • By: Sherman Alexie
  • Narrated by: Sherman Alexie
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,343
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,241
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,234

When his mother passed away at the age of 78, Sherman Alexie responded the only way he knew how: He wrote. The result is this stunning memoir. Featuring 78 poems and 78 essays, Alexie shares raw, angry, funny, profane, tender memories of a childhood few can imagine - growing up dirt poor on an Indian reservation, one of four children raised by alcoholic parents. Throughout, a portrait emerges of his mother as a beautiful, mercurial, abusive, intelligent, complicated woman.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • True connection

  • By Tom on 07-20-17

Just What I Wanted to Hear More Of

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

I am a huge fan of The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian. This book gives me all the "more" that I wanted when I read that. I knew that book was "semi-autobiographical" but this actual memoir makes it appear almost entirely autobiographical and here we get more detail. Alexie is a fascinating person and his narration really adds to the experience. Listeners should know that there is a lot of poetry mixed in with this memoir. Normally, I don't like poetry, or think I don't, but I found a new appreciation for it when read here by the author. The book makes you think, about poverty, culture, mental illness, addiction, loss, you name it. You could say that Alexie is obsessed with his late mother, but his experiences with his late bipolar mother almost leave the reader with PTSD so he can hardly be blamed. Alexie himself is also bipolar and discusses this and his brain surgery, though the one thing I noticed he didn't go into here was his own alcoholism, though he discusses his alcoholic father at length. He shares a lot of opinions on many subjects, including politics, and does this in straight forward no holds barred fashion. I appreciated the intensity and honesty of this memoir. For people not familiar with the author, i recommend The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian first, while keeping in mind this book is much more adult in language and content.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • You'll Grow Out of It

  • By: Jessi Klein
  • Narrated by: Jessi Klein
  • Length: 7 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,064
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,863
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,844

In You'll Grow Out of It, Jessi Klein offers - through an incisive collection of real-life stories - a relentlessly funny yet poignant take on a variety of topics she has experienced along her strange journey to womanhood and beyond. These include her "transformation from Pippi Longstocking-esque tomboy to are-you-a-lesbian-or-what tom man", attempting to find watchable porn, and identifying the difference between being called "ma'am" and "miss" (" miss sounds like you weigh 99 pounds").

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I like this woman so much!

  • By Sarah F. on 07-24-16

Often Funny, Sometimes Unsympathetic

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

I didn't know who the author was when I picked this book. I actually picked it because I thought the concept of being a "tomman", the grown up version of a tomboy, and how it affects you in life was interesting. That isn't what this book, or even that chapter is about however. Though Klein may have been viewing herself as uninterested in the feminine, that is the exact opposite of who she really is. She is completely obsessed by it. Which I should point out doesn't mean she isn't funny. Parts of this book are very funny. One thing which I found sort of irritating was her self absorbed complaining in situations of great economic advantage. The worst case of it is when she is at the Emmys, winning an Emmy, basically complaining that the biggest Hollywood stars are having more of a princess experience than she is. Of course, the Emmy was for writing for Inside Amy Schumer and if you have any experience with watching the usual character Amy portrays you will recognize that self absorbed character. You should also expect lots of crude material, sex jokes, etc. Comedians are comedians I suppose because of their insecurities and that is fully on display here. But again, I did laugh quite a bit.

  • The Girl on the Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Paula Hawkins
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Louise Brealey, India Fisher
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130,618
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115,284
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 115,150

Audie Award, Audiobook of the Year, 2016. Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. "Jess and Jason," she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost. And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel offers what she knows to the police, and becomes inextricably entwined in what happens next, as well as in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Compulsively readable, The Girl on the Train is an emotionally immersive, Hitchcockian thriller and an electrifying debut.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The Girl on The Train

  • By BookReader on 12-30-15

Compelling Mystery with Hateable characters

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-20-16

Most of the negative reviews I saw were based on the fact that the characters are not likable people.This is true. However, this is a mystery, not a romance, so I didn't feel the need to fall in love with the characters, only to figure out what happened. I don't usually try to solve a mystery, but somehow I felt compelled to try here. There are a number of characters and it is hard to like any of them. I didn't so much like our main character Rachel but I have often read memoirs or novels with female alcoholic characters and usually find them interesting. One interesting thing about Rachel, is that her issues and cringe worthy behavior cannot be entirely blamed on her alcoholism because any Rachel scene can become painful due to bad decisions even when she hasn't had a sip. Rachel may be a train wreck of a woman but Anna and Megan were in my opinion worse. Anna is a smug mistress turned wife and Megan has to be the most immature and self centered of them all. The book would certainly make a reader wonder if the author hates women (despite being one herself) except that the male characters manage to be pretty awful too. That said, I really did want to know what happened. The resolution while believable enough, was not necessarily what I would have chosen. But I guess why have an uplifting conclusion to any book filled with these people? That is to say, there didn't seem to be a message at the end, just a conclusion. I did figure out who the killer was though not right away, not until there was some whittling down of suspects. Narrators were good. They reminded me very much of the narrators of Try Not To Breathe. Alcoholic Rachel sounded like alcoholic Alex and young self centered Megan sounded just like young self centered Amy. So much so I checked if they were the same, but they weren't.

  • A Thousand Naked Strangers

  • A Paramedic's Wild Ride to the Edge and Back
  • By: Kevin Hazzard
  • Narrated by: George Newbern
  • Length: 6 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 641
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 577
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 575

In the aftermath of 9/11, Kevin Hazzard felt that something was missing from his life - his days were too safe, too routine. A failed salesman turned local reporter, he wanted to test himself, see how he might respond to pressure and danger. He signed up for emergency medical training and became, at age 26, a newly minted EMT running calls in the worst sections of Atlanta. His life entered a different realm - one of blood, violence, and amazing grace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Wild Ride You Won't Forget!

  • By Kathy on 05-23-17

Everything for people fascinated by EMS

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-16

I always thought that being a paramedic must be a fascinating job. Not for me, but for the thrill seeking sort. This book validates all of that - it is full of interesting stories and funny stories with a background thrillingly horrible. I don't think I ever need to read a book like this again - it has covered everything from training through a complete career and my curiosity is satisfied. It felt a little bit long but I guess that is to be expected when it encompasses an entire career. Well performed.

  • Shockaholic

  • By: Carrie Fisher
  • Narrated by: Carrie Fisher
  • Length: 4 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,051
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 959
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 959

Told with the same intimate style, brutal honesty, and uproarious wisdom that placed Wishful Drinking on the New York Times bestseller list for months, Shockaholic is the juicy account of Carrie Fisher’s life, focusing more on the Star Wars years and dishing about the various Hollywood relationships she’s formed since she was chosen to play Princess Leia at only 19 years old.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Shockingly Nearly Perfect Book

  • By Gretchen SLP on 01-11-16

Topics not as interesting as Wishful Drinking

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-15-16

I really enjoyed Wishful Drinking and started this one shortly after that. While I liked it well enough I couldn't help but compare and the comparison was not flattering for this book. There seemed to be fewer topics and there was much less humor. She discusses her ECT (shock therapy), Chris Dodd, Michael Jackson, Elizabeth Taylor and finally and at great length, her father's last years, Just not as upbeat as Wishful Drinking though certainly interesting in parts.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stiff Competition

  • By: Annelise Ryan
  • Narrated by: Jorjeana Marie
  • Length: 10 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 287
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 264
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 263

Every fall, hunting season in Sorenson, Wisconsin, leads to some accidental injuries. Deputy coroner Mattie Winston just hopes the hunters don't bring any more business to her office. But somebody seems to have declared open season on land developers. One real estate developer who's recently come to town has been found dead in the woods, with an arrow through his neck. Now it's up to Mattie to get to the bottom of the killing.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Love Mattie

  • By Beatrice on 03-06-16

Typical Mattie

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-16

Once you get this far into a series like that it gets harder to accurately review the books. This book would not be interesting outside the context of the series, not useful as a stand alone story. I enjoyed it because I enjoy Mattie and Hurley and their friends. If you've read these books then you are used to the fact that there always has to be something interfering in their relationship. This time around it is Emily again. I was a bit disappointed by this since I thought we got over that last time, but I found the plots interesting and enjoyed the characters even if Mattie's immaturity occasionally gets on my nerves. Of course what fun would a perfect heroine be anyway? I already know I will get the next when it comes out.

  • Wishful Drinking

  • By: Carrie Fisher
  • Narrated by: Carrie Fisher
  • Length: 3 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,777
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,119

In Wishful Drinking, Carrie Fisher tells the true and intoxicating story of her life with inimitable wit. Born to celebrity parents, she was picked to play a princess in a little movie called Star Wars when only 19 years old. "But it isn't all sweetness and light sabers."

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Another Perspective....

  • By Allan on 12-22-08

Funny, once you get used to listening to her

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-16

It does take a little bit to get used to Carrie Fisher's voice if you haven't really been listening to her since Star Wars. She does sound (not surprisingly I suppose) like a person who partied too much. Once I got over that I was able to enjoy just how incredibly funny she really is. She even made me enjoy the tales of old Hollywood stars who normally might not have interested me. Keep in mind not to listen to it in the car with your kids there due to language, drug references and some crude sexual humor. As others have mentioned there is not a whole lot of Star Wars stuff in this book, but she has another memoir and yet another coming soon for those who want more. I plan to listen to those as well.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lost Girls

  • An Unsolved American Mystery
  • By: Robert Kolker
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 11 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 534
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 481
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 482

One late spring evening in 2010, Shannan Gilbert, after running through the oceanfront community of Oak Beach screaming for her life, went missing. No one who had heard of her disappearance thought much about what had happened to the 24-year-old: She was a Craigslist prostitute who had been fleeing a scene. The Suffolk County Police, too, seemed to have paid little attention - until seven months later, when an unexpected discovery in a bramble alongside a nearby highway turned up four bodies, all evenly spaced, all wrapped in burlap. But none of them Shannan's.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • No answers

  • By Sam on 07-24-13

Interesting Look at the Victims

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

One problem with true stories about crime is that they center on and glorify killers. That doesn't happen here not only because these are unsolved killings but because the book is truly victim-centric. The beginning of the book does a great job of presenting the victims to you as real people. This was the most interesting part to me. It is actually amazing the depth of the profiles considering not only that they needed to be put together after the women disappeared but because their lives were so unstable at times. I find poverty and the family dysfunction that so often accompanies it to be very interesting. We see in these parallel lives, so many of the same problems and bad decisions that the ending seems almost inevitable. One problem with this as an audio book though is that is is easy to get the victims confused as we switch between their stories over and over. Was that Melissa or Megan, was that the one with the mother Lynn or Lorraine? And without the book you can loose track. I found the part of the book about the community where the bodies were found to drag and be less compelling than the girls stories were. Towards the end we deal a lot with the families and it is like getting first hand into the dysfunction that shaped these women in the first place. Like all unsolved mysteries it leaves a sense of frustration that we aren't truly getting closure,.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Drinking

  • A Love Story
  • By: Caroline Knapp
  • Narrated by: Gabra Zackman
  • Length: 9 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 747
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 657
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 657

Fifteen million Americans a year are plagued with alcoholism. Five million of them are women. Many of them, like Caroline Knapp, started in their early teens and began to use alcohol as "liquid armor", a way to protect themselves against the difficult realities of life. In this extraordinarily candid and revealing memoir, Knapp offers important insights not only about alcoholism, but about life itself and how we learn to cope with it.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Big Picture of Alcohol Dependence

  • By Karen K on 07-26-16

The Big Picture of Alcohol Dependence

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

I find memoirs of female alcoholics interesting, (For some reason the male alcoholic memoir seems to have been done to death). This however, is a really good one for getting a big picture of alcoholism over a long span. Knapp is billed as a high functioning alcoholic and we really see how at first things seem under control and then over time start to decay around her. I like how you can go from reading about alcohol in that infatuated way at first and then come to the end and see how really it is no fun at all. I feel like the author has missed something if their alcoholism memoir makes me feel like drinking. I also like that this isn't a book full of a long list of embarrassing episodes that make you cringe. There was more to her decision that she was an alcoholic than repeated embarrassing mistakes. Not to imply that she doesn't make many bad decisions, only that there is more to her than that. Often addiction memoirs fall flat when the author gets to the recovery period and begins making many general statements - in this case she talks a lot of women and the negative impact of sexuality and men. It annoyed me at first, but I had to realize that at that point she was generalizing from her discussions with other female alcoholics and not necessarily implying these things applied to the better adjusted non addicted members of society. I found it interesting also how at first she talks about a certain amount of denial because to her alcoholics have alcoholic family members and dysfunctional family situations and she's from an upper class family, but over time we discover with her that she is indeed part of a dysfunctional family with alcoholics after all. It made me sad to realize that she only lived a short time after writing this memoir. It was such a long road to gaining this control over her life and having finally done it she had so little time to enjoy it.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Nature of the Beast

  • A Chief Inspector Gamache Novel
  • By: Louise Penny
  • Narrated by: Robert Bathurst
  • Length: 12 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,298
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,056
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,039

Hardly a day goes by when nine-year-old Laurent Lepage doesn't cry wolf. From alien invasions to walking trees to winged beasts in the woods to dinosaurs spotted in the village of Three Pines, his tales are so extraordinary no one can possibly believe him. Including Armand and Reine-Marie Gamache, who now live in the little Quebec village.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Heart breaking narrator

  • By Jeff on 09-18-15

Solid Gamache novel, miss old narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-26-16

I have to say the new narrator was ok, but it is hard not to hear the true voice of Gamache. It was certainly not as easy to tell when Gamache was speaking as opposed to basic narration, but of course there is nothing to do about that since the old narrator has passed away. On the bright side, I have to say that this was the fastest moving of all of these books. It is almost a given that a Gamache novel has to have long digression on history or art and inevitably will drag in spots and this is the first one where I did not notice that. At first I was feeling a little annoyed at the far fetched plot and only later discovered that a lot of what I found too fantastical was actually taken from real events.which were nicely blended into her fiction. The other typical Penny things were there - for example all the characters know something that you don't and go on and on for pages keeping you in suspense (who is John Fleming in this case). That always makes me want to bang my head against the wall buts he's done it before so no surprise. I certainly did not solve this mystery - I was confused at the end if we even were going to solve it, but we did in the end. I am not sure that she was able to convince me that he solution was entirely believable but it certainly kept me interested I will get the next one when it comes out..

2 of 2 people found this review helpful