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Craig

Cape Town, South Africa
  • 10
  • reviews
  • 32
  • helpful votes
  • 54
  • ratings
  • Macbeth: A Novel

  • By: A. J. Hartley, David Hewson
  • Narrated by: Alan Cumming
  • Length: 9 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,931
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,587
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,584

Macbeth: A Novel brings the intricacy and grit of the historical thriller to Shakespeare’s tale of political intrigue, treachery, and murder. In this full-length novel written exclusively for audio, authors A. J. Hartley and David Hewson rethink literature’s most infamous married couple, grounding them in a medieval Scotland whose military and political upheavals are as stark and dramatic as the landscape in which they are played.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Narrator choice inspired

  • By Beverly on 07-10-11

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-18

Gripping story. One of the best readers that I have ever listened to. Highly recommended.

  • The Aeneid

  • By: Virgil
  • Narrated by: Charlton Griffin
  • Length: 15 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 305
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 195
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 190

The Aeneid represents one of the greatest cultural and artistic achievements of Western Civilization. Within the brooding and melancholy atmosphere of Virgil's pious masterpiece lies the mythic story of Aeneas and his flight from burning Troy, taking with him across the Mediterranean the survivors of the Greek onslaught. Aeneas, after many travails and adventures, including a love affair with Dido Queen of Carthage and a visit to the underworld to see his father, ends up in Italy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An epic in every sense of the word

  • By James on 01-06-05

Somewhat disapointing

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-30-18

Any additional comments?

Disclaimer: this is my first reading of the Aeneid. Two main criticism from my side (dare I criticise Virgil)

1) The reader was not great, he constantly mispronounced basic English words. Aside from the mispronunciation he was easy to listen to if not very exciting
2) The book read like a cheap knockoff of Homer:
* Achilles gets a fancy shied from the gods, so does Aeneas
* They try to finish the war in Troy with a one on one fight – they try to in the Aneaid
* Homer has long and drawn out metaphors, so does the Aenead (like a ……..so did….) etc

Maybe I should try a different translation, but I found it boring and somewhat trite. The Iliad and Odyssey were so much better.


0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Stinker Lets Loose!

  • By: Mike Sacks, James Taylor Johnston
  • Narrated by: Jon Hamm, Eric Martin, Andy Richter, and others
  • Length: 5 hrs and 53 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 854
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 793
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 796

Mike has teamed up with director Eric Martin to adapt the novelization into a fully immersive cinematic audio experience, and an epic all-star cast has come together to introduce Stinker to a whole new generation of fans! It's Smokey and the Bandit meets Every Which Way But Loose meets Smokey and the Bandit Parts 2 and 3. Feel the thrill as Stinker teams up with old pals Boner and Jumbo, plus new friends Buck and Rascal the Chimp, for a crazy ride across the highways and byways of Bicentennial America.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Live performance at end is worth it!

  • By Frank on 02-23-18

Worst book I have ever read; strangely compelling

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-17-18

Any additional comments?

The worst book I have ever read, yet strangely compelling. The story is poorly written, trite, full of stereotypes & cliches regarding race, gender and age. It manages to offend almost everybody, yes somehow the reading makes you curious to see what exactly is going to happen next.

I keep finding myself wondering what the crazy antic will be, and wondering if it can be even more outlandish than the previous one.

The dramatisation is excellent; and the cast do a superb job reading their parts. But don't read this book if you're easily offended.

6 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Titus Groan

  • Gormenghast Trilogy
  • By: Mervyn Peake
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 21 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 5

As the first novel opens, Titus, heir to Lord Sepulchrave, has just been born: He stands to inherit the miles of rambling stone and mortar that stand for Gormenghast Castle. Inside, all events are predetermined by a complex ritual, lost in history, understood only by Sourdust, Lord of the Library. There are tears and strange laughter; fierce births and deaths beneath umbrageous ceilings; dreams and violence and disenchantment contained within a labyrinth of stone.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic writing

  • By Craig on 10-03-17

Fantastic writing

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-17

Some of the most incredible use of English I have ever experienced. Excellent reader. Highly recommend.

  • A Prayer for Owen Meany

  • By: John Irving
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 26 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,473
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,100
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,108

Of all of John Irving's books, this is the one that lends itself best to audio. In print, Owen Meany's dialogue is set in capital letters; for this production, Irving himself selected Joe Barrett to deliver Meany's difficult voice as intended. In the summer of 1953, two 11-year-old boys – best friends – are playing in a Little League baseball game in Gravesend, New Hampshire. One of the boys hits a foul ball that kills the other boy's mother. The boy who hits the ball doesn't believe in accidents; Owen Meany believes he is God's instrument. What happens to Owen after that 1953 foul ball is extraordinary and terrifying.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Painfully nostalgic

  • By Barry on 07-29-15

Remarkable story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-17

Any additional comments?

This is not a quick read; it is an unhurried and slow read, yet I enjoyed (almost) every page. Full of religious overtones (if you're not religious don't let that put you off), it is still a remarkable story.

In the interview at the end of the audio book, John Irving said that he is not religious, and he partly wrote the book to answer what would need to happen in his life to make him a believer.

The book is full of the crazy characters and situations you would expect in an Irving book (the crazy grandmother, the dead mother, the obsessive headmaster, the rockstar cousin, the retired music teacher...). If you enjoy his other books you will enjoy this one.

Highly enjoyable!

Joe Barrett's narration is brilliant - one of the best narrations I have ever heard.

  • A Brief Guide to Islam

  • Brief Histories
  • By: Paul Grieve
  • Narrated by: Roger Davis
  • Length: 16 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 22
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 20

Exploring the beliefs, history and politics of the ordinary people of Muslim countries, Grieve cuts through the complexities as he examines all aspects of Islam. He also addresses the big issues: Can Islam support true democracy? Is true democracy what the West really wants for Muslim countries or are we merely seeking a cover of legitimacy for a policy of 'might is right'? Paul Grieve is an unbeliever - he is not a born-again Muslim, a proselytizer or a frustrated desert romantic. His aim is to inform.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fair and square

  • By Michael on 10-05-14

Very good book, but biased

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-15

Any additional comments?

I read the book because I wanted to find out more about Islam, and this is an excellent book for that. There is a lot of information about belief, history, the schools, culture, architecture, food and politics.

However there are sections (in particular towards the beginning) whereby it is very biased towards Islam and against Christianity and Judaism. He is almost trying to show why Islam is better then Christianity and Judaism, presenting a very one-sided view of many historical events.

But if you can ignore the bias, having read the book I feel I have a much better understanding and I would recommend the book to anybody wanting to find out more about Islam.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Revival

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: David Morse
  • Length: 13 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 42

In a small New England town, in the early '60s, a shadow falls over a small boy playing with his toy soldiers. Jamie Morton looks up to see a striking man, the new minister. Charles Jacobs, along with his beautiful wife, will transform the local church. Then tragedy strikes the Jacobs family, the preacher curses God, mocking all religious belief, and is banished from the shocked town. Jamie has demons of his own. In his mid-30s, he is living a nomadic lifestyle of bar-band rock and roll. Addicted to heroin, stranded, desperate, he sees Jacobs again....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not one of his best!

  • By Josie on 11-30-14

Excellent reader.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-15

Not his best book. But it was still enjoyable. The performance was brilliant. I loved the characters in the book.

  • Influx

  • By: Daniel Suarez
  • Narrated by: Jeff Gurner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,835
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,279
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,286

Particle physicist Jon Grady is ecstatic when his team achieves what they've been working toward for years: A device that can reflect gravity. Their research will revolutionize the field of physics - the crowning achievement of a career. Grady expects widespread acclaim for his entire team. The Nobel Prize. Instead, his lab is locked down by a shadowy organization whose mission is to prevent at all costs the social upheaval sudden technological advances bring.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Solid to Silly to Inane

  • By Craig on 05-15-14

Excellent story and excellent reader

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-13-14

Any additional comments?

This is one of those books where you hope to get stuck in traffic so you can continue listening in the car. By far the best produced audio book that I have ever read. Excellent story and excellent reader.

2 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Undercover Economist

  • By: Tim Harford
  • Narrated by: Cameron Stewart
  • Length: 8 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 52
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 54

Ever wondered why the gap between rich and poor nations is so great, or why it's so difficult getting a foot on the property ladder, or how to outwit Starbucks? This audiobook offers the hidden story behind these and other questions, as economist Tim Harford reveals how supermarkets, airlines, and coffee chains, to name just a few, are vacuuming money from our wallets.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Down to earth economics

  • By Neuron on 04-15-13

Good but dated

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-14

Would you try another book from Tim Harford and/or Cameron Stewart?

Yes

What was the most interesting aspect of this story? The least interesting?

The book is pretty good, but since it is per the housing loan crisis a lot of the numbers are a little dated. The book is full of interesting stories and anecdotes explaining his principles, but sometimes the explanations are a little thin. What may be obvious to an economist is not always that obvious to me the layperson.

In some cases I got the impression that the author felt that his economic views were right, and everybody else's was wrong without giving a balanced viewpoint.

Was The Undercover Economist worth the listening time?

Yes

Any additional comments?

Very good reader, but he speaks fast.

  • Buddhism

  • By: Malcolm David Eckel, The Great Courses
  • Narrated by: Malcolm David Eckel
  • Length: 12 hrs and 30 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 775
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 701
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 688

Buddhism has captivated many millions of people around the world, its vitality and adaptability enabling it to transform the civilizations of India, Southeast Asia, Tibet, China, Korea, and Japan, and also become a lively component in the cultures of Europe, Australia, and the Americas. But have you ever wondered how a religion that doesn't even have a god could have accomplished this?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Accessible and informative

  • By Jennifer on 07-14-14

Informative, entertaining and personal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-13

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Very informative lectures. The balance between being high level and providing too much information is well maintained. The author is clearly an expert on the subject, he draws from personal experience and tells us many anecdotes about his personal experience with Buddhism.

Informal and relaxed lecture style; very easy to listen to. I highly recommend this lecture series.

What was one of the most memorable moments of Buddhism?

He is very passionate about the subject.

15 of 18 people found this review helpful