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KJB

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  • Length: Not Yet Known
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Engaging, Enlightening, a bit Eccentric

  • By KJB on 06-24-16

Engaging, Enlightening, a bit Eccentric

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-24-16

Despite dubious readings of several New Testament texts (especially in earlier lectures), Magness offers a engaging and enlightening survey, as well as some rather interesting and compelling readings of New Testament and other texts. I'll aim to listen through the series again later this year.

  • The Almost Nearly Perfect People

  • Behind the Myth of the Scandinavian Utopia
  • By: Michael Booth
  • Narrated by: Ralph Lister
  • Length: 13 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 408
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 368
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 359

Journalist Michael Booth has lived among the Scandinavians for more than 10 years, and he has grown increasingly frustrated with the rose-tinted view of this part of the world offered up by the Western media. In this timely audiobook, he leaves his adopted home of Denmark and embarks on a journey through all five of the Nordic countries to discover who these curious tribes are, the secrets of their success, and, most intriguing of all, what they think of one another.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing! Anthropological, historical, entertaining

  • By Jay Friedman on 09-30-15

A fabulous tour

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-16-16

What a fabulous tour of Scandanavia and the Nordic peoples, places, prospects, and problems. We join Booth as he glances at the nations and regions from both below and above, enabling us to put into context the admiration and opprobrium cast from afar and lodged from within and among the residents of these states. I'll let it simmer for a couple of weeks and then listen again!

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Going Clear

  • Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief
  • By: Lawrence Wright
  • Narrated by: Morton Sellers
  • Length: 17 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,743
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,338
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,318

A clear-sighted revelation, a deep penetration into the world of Scientology by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of the The Looming Tower, the now-classic study of al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attack. Based on more than 200 personal interviews with both current and former Scientologists - both famous and less well known - and years of archival research, Lawrence Wright uses his extraordinary investigative ability to uncover for us the inner workings of the Church of Scientology.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Scared the Hell Out of Me

  • By Chris Reich on 02-02-13

Knowing Scientology

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-24-14

What did you love best about Going Clear?

Lawrence Wright knows how to write! This is yet another stupendous work showing that Wright is worthy of yet another Pulitzer.

What did you like best about this story?

This is meticulously researched, carefully crafted, and stunningly written exposé that compels readers and listeners forward as clarifying prose cascades over one's consciousness and through one's imagination. Wright points up both the humanity and inhumanity of Hubbard, his minions, and his successor.

If you could give Going Clear a new subtitle, what would it be?

"The Personalities, the Power, and the Politics" • I think one of the most significant features of Wright's exposé is how Miscavige was able to pressure a massive government agency to waive the large part of a massive tax penalty and grant a religious tax exemption. But he succeeded in pulling this off. It is this constellation of corruption and cover up that begs, absolutely begs, for its own exposé.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful