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Oliver

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Inspiring

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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-26-19

An inspiring glimpse into possible alien minds. Children of Ruin is the kind of science fiction that inspires real scientists to pursue fantastic new technology. In my view, Tchaikovsky's Children series belongs in the cannon of great science fiction with classics like Asimov's Foundation Series and Orson Scott Card's Enderverse.

Sounds like conputer generated word salad

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
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1 out of 5 stars
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1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-19

The contrast between the quality of this book and its reviews makes me wonder whether some authors are buying dive star reviews. I hope I'm wrong because that would be terrible for the Audible community.

Changed my perspective on human needs

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5 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-05-19

As a scientifically minded person, I am usually suspicious of books that rely entirely on anecdotes to support their claims. This is a notable exception. Dr Rosenberg's ideas are, to the best of my knowledge, always consistent with the strongest scientific evidence - although he does not refer to it - because as it turns out in this case, common sense and compassion are good enough! His stories are memorable and it is a pleasure to hear them from the man who experienced them.

A timely critique

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5 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-06-19

In the era of the reproducibility crisis, scientists from diverse disciplines often aspire to the standards of physics, where experimental results are orders of magnitude more reliable than elsewhere. Hossenfelder and Jennings point out that there is another problem eating away at many scientific disciplines, and specifically affecting theoretical particle physics: an overweening reliance on aesthetic judgements such as 'naturalness' and elegance. The authors offer a timely critique of this growing problem with detailed examples and compelling interviews -- while remaining circumspect about making philosophical assertions that generalize out of their area of expertise. I recommend this book to any practicing scientist or philosopher of science.

19 of 19 people found this review helpful

A sprawling historic account of...

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5 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

A sprawling historic account of an inflection point in the history of science and mathematics.

Amir Alexander tells the story of how the concept of the infinitesimal became a flash point for opposing personalities in the Catholic Church, then the English parliament. He does so in great detail, sometimes going on circumlocutious tangents to set the scene. The book is more for historians than for philosophers of science and mathematics. Still, if you have the patience, the stories he tells will leave you with a very different perspective on how powerful and contentious mathematical debates can be.

He contends that this conflict over infinitesimals helped to determine the cultural and technological fates of England and Italy. I am unsure about this hard to verify assertion. Still, there is no doubt for me that analysis is a deeply philosophical and not just logicomathematical concept.

He writes what he prescribes!

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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-28-18

Some complain that Strunk and White's book Elements of Style breaks its own rules. Not so with Elements of Eloquence. A lovely listen. Full of instructive and hidden examples. Forsyth defines the rhetorical figures with definitions embedded in their respective rhetorical figures. Then he embeds the figures into the rest of his pros. You can pick out examples as you go.

Well crafted.

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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-18

Irvine and Cronin give a clear, conversational but not breezy treatment of applied Stoicism. There are many personal guides to Stoicism cropping up these days (Holiday, Robertson, Pigliucci, etc.). Along with Becker's theoretical book A New Stoicism, this is the one modern practical guide I return to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

Solid overiew

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4 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars
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4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-18

As usual, this very short introduction is authoritative and well organized. Good introduction; even better as a review to clarify and distill the important parts of memory science.

Excellent clear overview

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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-18

Carey distills the main findings of learning science into clear, well written and well narrated interlocking practical advice. His synthesis seems consistent with the Oxford Handbook of Learning Science and all lectures I've seen on topic. A very good introduction or clarifying review. Highly recommend.

Excellent

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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars
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5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-27-18

James Glick tells the conceptual history of information from the social, economic, philosophic and scientific perpectives. He oscillates through phases of biographical, analytical and speculative interludes. In doing so, he interweaves tough concepts with compelling narratives and strikes a balance that compelled but did not fatigue me as a listenner.