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Caleb

Texas
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  • A Watched Pot

  • By: Mr. Blue
  • Narrated by: David Morley Hale
  • Length: 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 11
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 11

Graham is trying his hardest to save his marriage. When his wife, Cressida, invites two new friends over for dinner he offers to cook even though he has no experience with vegan food. Something troubles Graham about the couple, but he can’t quite put his finger on it. He takes a journey into Facebook to find a terrible truth which creates a sinister consequence.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Secrets in the sauce...

  • By Mandymay💄👠👛 on 10-07-18

Well written and excellently narrated

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-10-18

I really enjoyed 'A Watched Pot', despite it being only 15 minutes long. I found the characters to be well written, the pacing good, and the ending well executed. The dialogue was well done, too, which is often a weak spot in a number of short stories I've read, most of which focus on the narrative, rather than the dialogue, which is often detrimental. David Morley Hale does an excellent job narrating, and has a quality to his voice that really suited the tone of the story.

Some have complained that the publisher's summary and the cover tagline reveal too much about the story, but even though I correctly guessed the ending early on, I found that I still enjoyed the story. If anything it adds to the foreshadowing of sinister events.

Overall this was a well written (if short) and well narrated story that I thoroughly enjoyed.

I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • Bloody Rose

  • By: Nicholas Eames
  • Narrated by: Katherine Fenton
  • Length: 18 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 335
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 315
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 313

Live fast, die young. Tam Hashford is tired of working at her local pub, slinging drinks for world-famous mercenaries and listening to the bards sing of adventure and glory in the world beyond her sleepy hometown. When the biggest mercenary band of all rolls into town, led by the infamous Bloody Rose, Tam jumps at the chance to sign on as their bard. It's adventure she wants - and adventure she gets as the crew embark on a quest that will end in one of two ways: glory or death.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Change of Perspective

  • By @tone0189 on 08-29-18

A solid sequel, if a bit less fun

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-30-18

'Bloody Rose' is the semi-stand alone sequel to Nicholas Eames's excellent 'Kings of the Wyld' and is a worthy follow up, despite not being as enjoyable as its predecessor.

Set approximately six years after the events of 'Kings of the Wyld', 'Bloody Rose' follows would-be bard Tam Hashford as she joins up with the infamous band Fable, fronted by the titular Bloody Rose, as they tour their way around Grandual in classic rockstar fashion, i.e. sex, drugs, and sold out arena shows. Whereas 'Kings of the Wyld' was about former legends coming to terms with age and glory days past, 'Bloody Rose' is about young superstars in their prime coming to terms with the shadows of the past they can't escape and the uncertainty of the future.

In a number of ways 'Bloody Rose' is deeper and more complex than 'Kings of the Wyld'. However, this comes at the cost of not being as fun or adventurous. While 'Bloody Rose' was certainly enjoyable, it lacked the energy and humor of 'Kings of the Wyld'. This is understandable given the darker edge found throughout 'Bloody Rose', both in the overall plot and in the characters themselves. This is demonstrated by the brokenness of the characters, and the scars they bear from troubled pasts. But part of what made 'Kings of the Wyld' so good was that it ignored the grimdark fantasy trend and doubled down on fun. None of this is to say 'Bloody Rose' is a bad story, rather it is a more grown-up story, and growing up is not always fun and sunshine.

Katherine Fenton's narration is good, and the majority of the voices she does are clear and unique. Her performance during some of the action scenes and dramatic moments was a bit underwhelming and didn't convey the intensity needed, but she wasn't bad.

'Bloody Rose' is good, and it expands and grows the world of Grandual, adding much needed history and depth to the world and its inhabitants. While I enjoyed 'Kings of the Wyld' more, 'Bloody Rose' is a solid and necessary progression in terms of characterization and world building. The diversity and humanity of the characters reflects Eames’s growth as an author, and I, for one, can’t wait for the next book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The 3 H's Trilogy

  • The Head, the House, and the Hell
  • By: Brian Barr
  • Narrated by: Rick Gregory
  • Length: 5 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 8

Here it is - The 3 H's Trilogy, now available in a complete collection that is a weird mix of cosmic horror, weird fiction, comedic bizarro, and dark romance! The 3 H's Trilogy begins with the story of a woman who falls in love with a decapitated head. From there, the story only gets weirder and darker, and is unlike any other tale ever written. Edited by Jeff O'Brien, who also provided an introduction for this collection.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A hidden jem

  • By Spooky Mike on 02-21-18

Compellingly Crazy Cosmic Horror

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-18

If there's one thing Brian Barr knows how to do it is to take the weird and macabre and go nuts with it. The 3 H's Trilogy combines the stories 'The Head', 'The House', and 'The Hell', and tells the story of the Bailey family and their cosmic house of horrors. 'The Head' and 'The House' set the stage and progressively build the story, it isn't until 'The Hell that it all the pieces come together. I initially listened to each story separately and found that the first two books work surprisingly well on their own, demonstrating Barr's talent for writing solid short horror stories.

'The Head' introduces the plot and gives a glimpse of the Bailey family in all their macabre madness. 'The House' reveals more of the Bailey family as well as introducing more well rounded characters. 'The Hell' is the over-the-top culmination of it all, with Barr cranking up the cosmic horror and madness. Personally, I found 'The House' to be the best of the three. Most of my complaints have to do with some unsympathetic characters, and that some of the plot twists in 'The Hell' seemed a bit convenient at times. Rick Gregory does a fine job narrating, but dialogue is still his weak spot, with much of it being delivered in a fairly deadpan way. But he does narrate clearly and at a steady pace, so it helps off set the negative.

Overall, the 3 H's Trilogy isn't my favorite Brian Barr work (that honor goes to his Metal Magic Trilogy), but if you enjoy cosmic horror with a double dose of weird and a bit of dark humor in the mix, this might just be the book for you.

I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • To Build a Fire

  • By: Jack London
  • Narrated by: Gregg Rizzo
  • Length: 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6

"To Build a Fire" is a short story. A man and a dog's relationship is followed throughout the story. The man is in strict control of the dog, as explicitly mentioned by London. The dog is almost like a slave to him. The dog is shown cowering before the man and following orders. There was no physical intimacy between the two. The man did not pet the dog or treat it fondly. In fact, the man forces the dog to go ahead of him when he suspects the ice will break. This helps to build the idea that the man believes nature is intended to serve him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A great short listen.

  • By Son of Odin on 08-31-18

Man vs Nature

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

'To Build A Fire' is very much a quintessential Jack London story. It's got man vs nature, Alaska, dogs, primitivist themes, and the hubris of civilization. London's philosophical views regarding nature and instinct are apparent, and well juxtaposed in the man and his dog. Greg Rizzo does a fine job narrating, and the overall production value is excellent.

Despite its bleak subject matter and short length, I really enjoyed it, and would recommend it.


I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • The Hell

  • The 3 H's, Book 3
  • By: Brian Barr
  • Narrated by: Rick Gregory
  • Length: 2 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

Susie and Mac are ghost hunters. They investigate and exorcise haunted houses for a living. A client hires Susie and Mac to investigate a house in Lexington, SC. Although they are experienced in handling malignant spirits and haunted territories, the client promises that this place is unlike any the ghost hunters have exorcised before. Susie and Mac never back down from a challenge, or from a job. They'll make their way to the house, and encounter the hell that's waiting for them. Whether they can survive or not is a different question.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Rest Now

  • By Eddie D. Moore on 06-18-18

The end has come

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

Wrapping up Brian Barr's 3 H's Trilogy, 'The Hell' ties together 'The Head' and 'The House', and brings it all crashing to an over the top, cosmically weird and gory conclusion. Despite wrapping up the plot and bringing it all together, I found I enjoyed Books 1 and 2 more. This isn't to say that 'The Hell' is bad, it's just that had more ups and downs. For example, I enjoyed Lucas's backstory and learning more about the history of the house. But I found Susie's plot to be odd and a bit of a let down.

Overall, Barr does a good job of bringing it all together and cranking the weird up to 11,while Rick Gregory does a decent job narrating.


I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • The House

  • The 3 H's, Book 2
  • By: Brian Barr
  • Narrated by: Rick Gregory
  • Length: 1 hr and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18

"Her name is Alexis. She's a punk girl with shabby green-dyed hair. She wears a pink collar around her neck. Alexis talks about growing up in Lexington, SC. She belongs to some strange cult, in which her family members are the only devotees: her mother, her father, and her brother. She hates them all. Whenever she brings up the house they share, I see her contempt. She wants to get away from it. I want to help her. I've helped others escape from cults in the past. Why can't I do the same now?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Short and creepy

  • By erobbins33 on 05-22-17

The plot thickens

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

'The House' is book two of The 3 H's Trilogy by Brian Barr. As with Book 1, 'The Head', 'The House' manages to be both a decent stand alone story, as well as furthering and deepening the overall plot of the trilogy. I found that I liked this story better than the first, I think in large part because it did go deeper into the overall story. It really scratched the itch left by the unanswered questions from Book 1, which is always enjoyable. Another improvement over 'The Head' were the characters Daniel and Alexis. The both had more depth than Bill and Elizabeth from Book 1, and their backstories really helped flesh out the plot.

As with Book 1, 'The House' is both gory, weird, and compelling. Rick Gregory delivers his usual solid performance, although his dialogue performance is still not the best.

I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • The Head

  • By: Brian Barr
  • Narrated by: Rick Gregory
  • Length: 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24

A woman finds a head in her mother's garden. Things get weirder when the head talks to her....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Different!

  • By erobbins33 on 04-30-17

An interesting beginning

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-18

'The Head' is the first book in Brian Barr's The Three H's Trilogy. The story follows a young woman, Elizabeth, who discovers a severed head in her mother's garden, which then begins speaking to her. However, despite being part of the larger story that unfolds throughout the trilogy, 'The Head' stands up well on it's own. There are still a lot of unanswered questions by the end, but it is done in such a way that you don't feel cheated. As another reviewer noted, 'The Head' is very odd, yet compelling, which is a balance I've found Barr excels at pulling off.

'The Head' is gory, mysterious, and delightfully outrageous. While not flawless, and not my favorite story from Barr, it manages to keep your attention all the way to the end and leave you wondering just what the heck is going on, but in a good way.

Rick Gregory's narration is solid, but as with much of his work I find dialogue to be his weak spot.


I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • Where a Spaceship Goes to Die

  • An Antigravel Short Story
  • By: George Saoulidis
  • Narrated by: Luke Rounda
  • Length: 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 31
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 30

When a scavenger captain offers her an unusual job in the middle of nowhere, Delphine accepts and tags along. But will she manage to get the treasure they're looking for when she has to operate a seadrone all by herself? When the treasure is buried in a spaceship graveyard two miles under water? And when the challenges she faces go beyond her wildest fears? This story was inspired by Point Nemo, a place located as far away from land as possible where spaceships go to die. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This really needs to become a full length novel!

  • By jstep on 08-30-18

Interesting, but lacking

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

This was a short and interesting story. The writing was good, and I feel like there are a lot of promising elements that could really be built upon in a sequel. That being said, some of the pacing and dialogue feltl a bit off, and because of the short length and cliffhanger ending I was left feeling largely unfulfilled. This is unfortunate, since there was a lot of potential here, both with the main character, Delphine, and with the direction the story was heading. In the end, there just needed to be more. With regards to the narration, the audio quality was a bit hollow sounding, but Luke Rounda more than made up for it with his solid narrating.

The characters and concepts are interesting, but ultimately the combination of brevity and limited world-building undermined what could have been great short story.

I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Zombie Extinction Event Novel #1: Suffer the Little Children

  • By: C.S Anderson
  • Narrated by: Thomas Stone
  • Length: 1 hr and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10

A bizarre pathogen has turned every child in the world who hasn't passed through puberty into a ravenous zombie! This creates a hell on Earth where zombie children roam the streets starving for living flesh.... 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • short but loved it

  • By TU on 10-02-18

Ankle Biter Armageddon

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-29-18

You know how a lot of zombie fiction and media tend to avoid kid zombies for the most parts? Well, C.S Anderson is making up for that underrepresentation. I have a soft spot for post-apocalyptic survival stories, and while 'Suffer The Little Children' isn't flawless, I enjoyed it quite a bit.

Overall it's a fairly straight forward zombie story, but with pre-pubescent children being the only ones affected. It makes for a familiar and yet disturbing mix. Anderson does a good job of tweaking some of the usual zombie tropes to give them a fresh edge. Thomas Stone's narration is solid for the most part. I found some his tone to be at odds with the scene from time to time, but nothing serious. One thing to note is that while the preview sample is representative of the narration and story style, the scene recounted isn't actually in the book, which I thought was a bit odd. While I would have liked it to be included, as it seems to recount the beginning of the outbreak, the story works fine without it.

As far as criticisms go, my only real dislike was for the villain, who was over the top in a contrived kind of way. I won't spoil anything, but really the only thing missing from his resume of evil was for him to be a Nazi or a member of ISIS. I found him to be the low spot of the story, with everything before and after being much more engaging.

All in all I enjoyed 'Suffer The Little Children'. It checked all the right boxes for an enjoyable zombie apocalypse story, despite a weak villain. The ending was well done and really has me interested in picking up the next book in the series to see where things go.


I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

  • Medea

  • By: Euripides
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Waters
  • Length: 1 hr and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9

Medea is an ancient Greek tragedy written by Euripides, based upon the myth of Jason and Medea and first produced in 431 BC. The plot centers on the actions of Medea, a former princess of the "barbarian" kingdom of Colchis, and the wife of Jason; she finds her position in the Greek world threatened as Jason leaves her for a Greek princess of Corinth. Medea takes vengeance on Jason by murdering Jason's new wife as well as her own children, after which she escapes to Athens to start a new life. 

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Narrator makes this story work

  • By cosmitron on 08-02-18

Hell hath no fury...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-23-18

"Well, when you gettin' got then somebody done got you and you go get them. When you get 'em, everybody's gon' get got." - Madea

While the above quote is from the Tyler Perry character, the Medea of Euripides' play would likely understand the sentiment quite well. Adultery, betrayal, feminism, revenge, murder, 'Medea' has it all, and demonstrates how great Greek tragedies can be. This is an excellent production of the classic story, and Jonathan Waters does a fantastic job narrating. He not only does voices for the characters, which greatly aids in differentiating between speakers, but his tone and delivery are excellent as well. While the language is a bit archaic (Shakespearean) and can be a little confusing at times, I found this added to the gravity of the story.

I greatly enjoyed listening to this production, and would recommend it.


I received a copy of this audiobook in exchange for an honest review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful