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South Korea
  • 18
  • reviews
  • 47
  • helpful votes
  • 34
  • ratings
  • Not Alone

  • By: Craig A. Falconer
  • Narrated by: James Patrick Cronin
  • Length: 22 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 6,871
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,393
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 6,381

When Dan McCarthy stumbles upon a folder containing evidence of the conspiracy to end all conspiracies - a top-level alien cover-up - he leaks the files without a second thought. The incredible truth revealed by Dan's leak immediately captures the public's imagination, but Dan's relentless commitment to exposing the cover-up and forcing disclosure quickly earns him some enemies in high places.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Impressive Book About Aliens & the Hype Industry

  • By Russell on 12-21-16

Definitely Silly

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-07-18

I'm going to parrot another reviewer here as I couldn't agree more. This book is silly. The main character is boring and even a little pathetic. He's a grown man who, on more than one occasion, has to be carried around like a child who fell asleep watching TV past his bedtime. He drinks too much and pukes cuz his witty tummy huwts, or he gets stressed and pukes all over his room like a 3-year old instead of making it to the bathroom like an adult. His other brother is a pseudo-father and Emma plays the role of his mother and they swap off baby-sitting duties. "Where's Dan?" "I thought he was with you!" "No, he's not with me, I thought he was with you!" Insert comedy here.

The the other cast of supporting characters all feel like they're characters in a poorly written book. None of these people behave the way real people would. Even the names "sound" phony. Prime ministers don't talk that way, heads of state don't behave that way, and I have a feeling like the Falconer took particular joy in making the American president behave like a spoiled teenager. The British PM comes off little better as he comes off like a true sleazy politician but is rewarded for it by the end of the book.

And the ending. Twist ending, but jokes on you, there's a double twist! We heard you like twists so Falconer twisted his twist so you can have twists while you twist. It has several times where it feels like it would have been a good place to end it but he kept going. The twist feels completely undeserved and by the second one I wanted to use a swear word.

This is not a good book. It feels more like badly written YA fiction and I'm glad I'm allowed to make returns on here.

  • Morningwood: Everybody Loves Large Chests (Vol.1)

  • By: Neven Iliev
  • Narrated by: Jeff Hays
  • Length: 8 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,286
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,116
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,118

Large chests are said to encompass all manner of hopes and dreams. Men covet them. Women envy them. But one fact holds true - everyone wants to get their hands on some big ones. The same holds true for one intrepid adventurer - a strapping young lad by the name of Himmel. Armed with his grandfather's trusty longsword and the dream of being the strongest, he sets out on the journey of a lifetime!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really Entertaining

  • By HeatherY on 11-23-17

Not LitRPG. Not sure what it is.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-16-18

My first issue with this book is that it isn't LitRPG. It's a fantasy novel with game menus slapped on. Unless there's some big secret reveal coming in later installments, this is an actual world except with leveling mechanics, not some sort of game construct or VR universe.

My second issue is the main character. The main character is what in any other book would be a villain. It's stupidly cruel, not so much out of malice but because it simply doesn't have the capacity to care about anything except eating or leveling (a function of the non-game world). It's amusing in the way watching a toddler trying to drink from the wrong side of the glass is amusing but in the end there's no reason to care about it. It starts out as being a barely sentient character to being a smarter character but only in terms of keeping itself alive and eating more. It doesn't evolve or become a sympathetic character in any way. It's survival is more pure dumb luck repeated so often to keep it going that I started to feel like the author was just screwing with me. Why even pretend that something that can't think beyond it's next meal is capable of besting foe after foe becoming an unkillable uber monster in the process?

The only reason I finished the book is because the further along I got into it the more I kept telling myself there had to be more involved here. But at the end, there wasn't. The story is amusing, as I said before, but painfully shallow. The author has some talent though, which is partly what makes this book so disappointing. I want to be satisfied with it, but I find I'm not.

The narrator did I great job though, I will give him that. Has great timing and his female voices were good.

I've read several comments that complain about the sexism in the book but it's really not that bad. The main female character Xera, is really the thing that allowed me to keep reading. Sure, her boobs get mentioned a few times and there is the odd line about women casters, but it feels like someone would have to be trying to get offended to make an issue out of that.

Will I listen to a sequel? I don't know. I'm not sure yet if I'll return this one.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Critical Failures V

  • Caverns and Creatures, Book 5
  • By: Robert Bevan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Sleep
  • Length: 9 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,780
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,690
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,684

Many view "hitting rock bottom" as a foundation on which to rebuild one's life, a place from which one can only ascend. Gamers know to search for a secret door leading down to the sewer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Half a Book

  • By P. Smith on 01-18-18

There's a good story here, but it's hard to find.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-18

I'm very conflicted about this series. I like the set up and the premise and I want to see some resolution, but Bevan is killing it for me. There is something to be said for dick jokes and toilet humor and--if you've played D&D--it certainly comes up, but this isn't a game of D&D. It's a novel, a story, a narrative adventure, and it feels like the author has forgotten that. Characters need to mature and change with a story, whether they become good or evil almost doesn't matter as long as there is some noticeable change. We need growth. Almost without exception, no one in this story changes. Being an obnoxious and annoying is fine as the story begins but 5 books into the series to still have every character stagnant, obnoxious, and doing the same thing, making the same mistakes, having the same arguments, what's the point? I haven't decided yet whether or not to return this last book because he leaves it with a nice cliffhanger but so much of the story is pointless.

And for the love of jebus, the level of urination and defecation in this book is... just gross. I'm not a prude, a good joke is a good joke but it feels like it's nearly every page. It's disgusting. There were times when I was in the middle of eating something while listening and here goes another person pooping, or having to touch poop or having to spit up poop that got in their mouth, or rolling around in poop, and I almost couldn't finish my meal. I wish an editor would get ahold of Bevan and slap some sense into him. The book feels like scat porn at some points.

I want to see how this series finishes but I really don't know if I can stomach another disgusting installment. I'm almost angry with Bevan for making a series that I want to finish but at the same time not sure if I want to sit through another book that is 40% full of adults who've never been house broken.

  • The Core

  • Demon Cycle, Book 5
  • By: Peter V. Brett
  • Narrated by: Pete Bradbury
  • Length: 29 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,297
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,081
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,076

For time out of mind, bloodthirsty demons have stalked the night, culling the human race to scattered remnants dependent on half-forgotten magics to protect them. Then two heroes arose - men as close as brothers, yet divided by bitter betrayal. Arlen Bales became known as the Warded Man, tattooed head to toe with powerful magic symbols that enable him to fight demons in hand-to-hand combat-and emerge victorious.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Hastily done.

  • By Marshall H on 10-09-17

I wasn't blown away.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-14-17

I've been a big fan of this book since the beginning and have looked forward to (and enjoyed) each previous installment. I don't know if I had this final installment built up in my mind to something that it couldn't live up to or if it really was just 'meh' but that's how I feel at the ending--just meh. Loose ends are wrapped up, for the most part, and some of the action was good but... I don't know. I wish I could articulate what it is that put me off this one but by the end, when the last words were spoken I wasn't happy or sad about it and I didn't feel any sense of loss as I normally do when I finish a really good book. Brett tells a good story and his characters are rich and complex and all of that is here in this book. Even Alagai Ka is almost sympathetic, to a point. Something is missing here though and I am disappointed that this book didn't give me the pay off I was expecting. I just wish I could say it was for sure my own fault or the fault of the story.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Critical Failures IV: The Phantom Pinas

  • Caverns and Creatures, Book 4
  • By: Robert Bevan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Sleep
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,973
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,805
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,802

The adventure continues. Tim and the C and C gang face their most difficult challenges yet. Horses die. Eyeballs are eaten. People are urinated on. A god is born.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Horse!

  • By John on 03-09-17

Still fun, but lacking.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-17

Would you try another book from Robert Bevan and/or Jonathan Sleep?

I'll continue with the series for now as I enjoy the possibilities, but the author is beginning to wear out his welcome. Jonathan Sleep is a competent narrator but not so good that I'd listen to books just because he read them.

Would you recommend Critical Failures IV: The Phantom Pinas to your friends? Why or why not?

Yes, if they are a fan of D&D, but not if they had a low tolerance for toilet humor. And I do mean toilet humor.

Would you listen to another book narrated by Jonathan Sleep?

I wouldn't not listen to it.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

Yes, possibly. As I said above, I like the story idea.

Any additional comments?

I like the possibilities of this series but I'm starting to get the feeling that Bevan is milking this for all he can. In this 4th installment very little happens in the way of moving the plot forward. Most of the book is spent with the various main characters bickering with each other and with what was initially the main protagonist, Tim, becoming almost unbearably annoying. When he enters a scene it's beginning to feel like when my step-mother would walk into a room as a child–I'm filled with low-levels of dread and wonder what the hell she's going to do now to ruin my day.

Also, the peeing. Peeing all the time, everywhere. One part early on sees several minutes of Tim and Cooper peeing and pooping all over Kat. There was really no reason for this level of bowel humor. If characters aren't peeing or pooping, they're covered in their own pee or poop. If they're not peeing or pooping or covered in their own pee or poop, they're peeing or pooping on someone else. And then there's the vomit. Tim especially likes to get fall down drunk and vomit on himself, piss himself, then pass out in pools of it, usually face first. Seriously, dude. Tone it down.

Then there's the pacing. we've now spent four books with our heros trying to get their hands on Mordred and get back to their regular lives and we're no closer to that happening by the end of this book than in the first. I'm fine with multiple installments and working my way through a long series as long as there is progress made. But here we have pages and pages of literally nothing happening, or nothing happening of any consequence. I'll give the series one more book, maybe two, then I'm out.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Good Intentions

  • By: Elliott Kay
  • Narrated by: Tess Irondale
  • Length: 22 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,750
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,619
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,618

He knew it was a dumb stunt from the start. A midnight run through a cemetery to impress a couple of girls is hardly the stuff of legend, but Alex Carlisle longs to escape the crushing mediocrity of life after high school. Then he stumbles upon the ritual, and the cultists, and two bound and bloodied women. Alex intervenes and the ritual blows up in his face, leaving him bound to them both: Rachel and Lorelei, an angel and a succubus.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well done with a side of porn?

  • By Sean O'Meara on 09-15-15

There is such a thing as too much sex.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-15

Would you consider the audio edition of Good Intentions to be better than the print version?

The narrator does a great job of articulating the moans and gasps in the many female characters. Not gonna lie, it was sexy. So, at least in that respect, it's better.

Have you listened to any of Tess Irondale’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

No, I haven't.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Some of the comments from Rachel were quite funny.

Any additional comments?

Too much sex. For the first 2/3rds of the book it's almost like there's a sex scene every 5 to 8 minutes. And when they weren't having sex Alex was moralizing about sex. There's very little plot development for the first 15 hours or so. Meet girl, have sex with girl, repeat. I appreciate a well-crafted sex scene, don't get me wrong, and the narrator's voice is dead sexy, but the amount of time spent with Alex and the numerous girls he beds was excessive. Before the last third of the book I was getting genuinely bored. I like the set-up and I'm probably going to download the sequel. I'm just crossing my fingers that the author has toned it down a bit in that one. There are some interesting characters here and I want to spend more time with them doing other things besides sex every other page.

12 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Old Earth

  • By: Gary Grossman
  • Narrated by: P. J. Ochlan
  • Length: 13 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,266
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,164
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,168

In the summer of 1601, Galileo Galilei made a startling discovery in the mountains of Eastern Italy that, if made public, could shatter faith in religion, bring down governments, and lead to worldwide turmoil. For more than 400 years, the secret has been guarded by a small group of incredibly powerful people, willing to do everything in their power to keep these discoveries from being made.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Truly one of the best novels I ever read

  • By Art Gaza on 05-18-15

What a cop-out.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-26-15

What did you like best about Old Earth? What did you like least?

It was an interesting premise, although one I'd come across before. I was hoping for more of a pay-off.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

The ending. Hours and hours of build-up and at the end of the book, nothing has changed. Scientist makes a big discovery and it makes zero difference by the end of the book.

What about P. J. Ochlan’s performance did you like?

His Irish accepts were amazingly done in my layman's opinion.

Was Old Earth worth the listening time?

Honestly, not really. I didn't dislike it enough to return it, but I am not impressed at all with the author's decision to end it the way he did.

Any additional comments?

Overall this book was a disappointment. I also was able to predict with a fair amount of accuracy several plot points before they happened. Once we finally get the reveal I was really hoping that this book would not do what so many others have done chicken out on the resolution. By the last chapter the whole thing was for nothing. Scientist makes an earth shattering discovery and when it's all said and done, it didn't even matter.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Cassandra Project

  • By: Jack McDevitt, Mike Resnick
  • Narrated by: Brian Holsopple
  • Length: 11 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 198
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 182
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 181

Early in his career, Jerry Culpepper could never have been accused of being idealistic. Doing public relations—even for politicians—was strictly business...until he was hired as NASA’s public affairs director and discovered a client he could believe in. Proud of the agency’s history and sure of its destiny, he was thrilled to be a part of its future—a bright era of far-reaching space exploration.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Jack McDevitt is one of my favorites.

  • By Marie on 12-01-12

A let down.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-14

What did you like best about The Cassandra Project? What did you like least?

The premise of the book was interesting. The thing I like least was the execution. The ending was very underwhelming.

If you’ve listened to books by Jack McDevitt and Mike Resnick before, how does this one compare?

I read a lot of older Jack McDevitt but this is my first audio book of his. I've never read any of Resnick's work (or listened). I would consider this one not McDevitt's best work. It had an interesting story but there were several times during the story where I was wishing they would just spit it out. It dragged on for what seemed like forever, just to get to a lackluster conclusion.

Who would you have cast as narrator instead of Brian Holsopple?

James Marsters. He's probably my favorite narrator.

Was The Cassandra Project worth the listening time?

I'd have to say no. I might end up returning this one. I'd added it to my wish list a long time ago and kept passing it over in favor of other things until I recently made the commitment to clear out all the stuff that's accumulated there. Now I wish I'd kept passing it over. It's an entirely forgettable read and the authors took the easy way out.

Any additional comments?

This could have been a much more interesting book but instead you're left with a very long build-up and very little satisfaction at the end. And the narrator, Brian Holsopple, made everyone sound like a grandfather or grandmother. Everyone in the book sounded 65 or above. I thought the book was filled with octogenarians. Granted, there were a decent amount of old people that had small roles in the story, but old should not be the default for everyone.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Skin Game

  • A Novel of the Dresden Files, Book 15
  • By: Jim Butcher
  • Narrated by: James Marsters
  • Length: 15 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 18,678
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 17,392
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 17,320

Harry Dresden, Chicago's only professional wizard, is about to have a very bad day.… Because as Winter Knight to the Queen of Air and Darkness, Harry never knows what the scheming Mab might want him to do. Usually, it’s something awful. He doesn’t know the half of it… Mab has just traded Harry’s skills to pay off one of her debts. And now he must help a group of supernatural villains - led by one of Harry’s most dreaded and despised enemies, Nicodemus Archleone - to break into the highest-security vault in town, so that they can then access the highest-security vault in the Nevernever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hold onto your staff; Harry’s back.

  • By Don Gilbert on 05-29-14

Worth the wait

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-10-14

What did you like about this audiobook?

Butcher tells a great story. This is a bit of a throw back to earlier Dresden novels where it has the feel of when he was still doing wizard detective work. And the narration by James Marsters is, as always, excellent.

Does the author present information in a way that is interesting and insightful, and if so, how does he achieve this?

Butcher has created a great world that is filled with intelligent and believable characters. You want the books to keep going just so you can find out what's around the next corner.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Atrocity Archives

  • A Laundry Files Novel
  • By: Charles Stross
  • Narrated by: Gideon Emery
  • Length: 10 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,102
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,848
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,847

Bob Howard is a computer-hacker desk jockey, who has more than enough trouble keeping up with the endless paperwork he has to do on a daily basis. He should never be called on to do anything remotely heroic. But for some reason, he is.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Listen for IT People

  • By Raymond on 06-16-13

Confusing, Disappointing, and Misleading

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-14

What did you like best about The Atrocity Archives? What did you like least?

The long, incredibly technical explanations for the phenomena and science utilized in the book. The author sometimes goes on for what seems like two to three paragraphs about things that make no sense and little or no effort is made to explain or include the reader in to the physics of this universe. Late in a series I could forgive this, but as the opener, it's a poor choice. Also, the book is written in present tense, which I find an unusual narrative choice. I got used to it, but it was a little jarring at first.

Would you recommend The Atrocity Archives to your friends? Why or why not?

Probably not, for reasons mentioned above. The "magic" in this book is incredibly hard to make sense of and the author either designed it that way or assumed readers would already know what he was talking about.

Have you listened to any of Gideon Emery’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I did enjoy the narrator. Especially when handling the love interest's Scottish accents.

Any additional comments?

I normally don't use a credit on a book less than 10 hours and I thought I was in the clear on this one. However, the book wrapped up at just over 8 hours and what follows is a nearly 2 hour preview of the next book. I felt a little bit cheated.

22 of 25 people found this review helpful