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Laura Lea Evans

  • 13
  • reviews
  • 13
  • helpful votes
  • 38
  • ratings
  • The Source Field Investigations

  • The Hidden Science and Lost Civilizations behind the 2012 Prophecies
  • By: David Wilcock
  • Narrated by: David Wilcock
  • Length: 19 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 926
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 826
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 822

A stunning synthesis of hidden science and lost prophecies, The Source Field Investigations exposes many great secrets: DNA transformation, consciousness science, wormholes, stargate travel, sacred geometry, ancient conspiracies, multidimensional time, the Maya calendar, and a stunning new model of galactic energy fields triggering mental, biological, and spiritual evolution.More than two million people have seen David Wilcock’s incredible tour of the 2012 prophecies in his Internet documentary, The 2012 Enigma.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The science behind Fringe

  • By Jay on 08-25-13

Ya Gotta Love David, or Don't bother!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-17-15

Where does The Source Field Investigations rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It was fascinating. Where does it rank? Can't answer that as I'm A David Wilcock "fan" of sorts but as stated, "ya gotta love him or forget it." He's real brain. His research is meticulous.

Who was your favorite character and why?

This is a narrative of major research. Not a novel.

Which scene was your favorite?

No scenes.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Nope.

Any additional comments?

For those who want to know more about how the "real" world works and what lies behind, this is a great book. David has a sense of humor even with his massive intellect at the forefront. Make up your own mind. I've listened to several of his books and will continue to do so as they become available.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Reason for Flowers

  • Their History, Culture, Biology, and How They Change Our Lives
  • By: Stephen Buchmann
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Yen
  • Length: 14 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 38

Flowers, and the fruits that follow, feed, clothe, sustain, and inspire all humanity. Flowers are used to celebrate all-important occasions, to express love, and are also the basis of global industries. Americans buy 10 million flowers a day, and perfumes are a worldwide industry worth $30 billion annually. Stephen Buchmann takes us along on an exploratory journey of the roles flowers play in the production of our foods, spices, medicines, and perfumes while simultaneously bringing joy and health.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Gardener's Thoughts

  • By Laura Lea Evans on 08-17-15

A Gardener's Thoughts

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-17-15

If you could sum up The Reason for Flowers in three words, what would they be?

Latin sucks big-time! Why do I say that? Because learning a dead language to use for the name of flowers is a hard thing to do when one is no longer in school. The author is justified in using the botanical names however, which is understood.

What other book might you compare The Reason for Flowers to and why?

Can't think of any off hand other than those from cosmologists. Same sort of difficult nomenclature to assimilate.

Which character – as performed by Jonathan Yen – was your favorite?

There was no character in this book. Not that I recall.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Absolutely not.

Any additional comments?

I'm a professional gardener, so spend four hours at a time, weeding beds, deadheading flowers and keeping other people's gardens looking nice. I enjoyed the book on several levels but sadly won't retain those Latin names, for the most part. And, most folks are content with common names for their plants anyhow, when we talk. Still, it was a worthy narration chattering in my head while I worked. Not panning this book in the least. I enjoyed it and have respect for the author.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Art of Racing in the Rain

  • By: Garth Stein
  • Narrated by: Christopher Evan Welch
  • Length: 6 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,192
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,323
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,324

Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enzo (because he's so wize) for president.

  • By Lora on 06-17-08

Multi-level experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-17-15

What made the experience of listening to The Art of Racing in the Rain the most enjoyable?

My history is one of cars and racing mainly in the 70s. I knew many of the automotive characters mentioned in the book either by name or personally so this brought more of the story to prominence. Ferrari has a special place in my heart. Weaving the tale around this topic from Enzo, the dog, was a unique story plot. There were many metaphysical images woven into the novel also which was highly appealing. "Where the eyes look, the car will follow," being one. A good metaphor for life.

What did you like best about this story?

It was gripping from beginning to end. Plenty of highs and lows and that dread when the story actually finished. Each time the break music came on, I was sure that would be it, and an inconclusive ending perhaps. Enjoyed the ride, in other words. Good dramatic license.

What does Christopher Evan Welch bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Oh, he was just great! He truly brought the characters to life and did an admirable job on some tricky accents and exotic names. The timber of his voice was pleasant as well. While I may still buy a physical copy of this story, the narration was far and away memorable and better in the long run. I shall listen again!

If you could take any character from The Art of Racing in the Rain out to dinner, who would it be and why?

Probably Enzo the dog, even though I'm not especially a canine sort of person. I think we could relate somehow.

Any additional comments?

This book gave me many tugs of nostalgia which was unexpected. It's not so much about racing but the time, the mentality, and the love of something we have lost, or in the case of The Art of Racing in the Rain, the loss of those most dear to us. The story activates neurons of deep memory and speaks to a soul.

  • The Whip: Inspired by the story of Charley Parkhurst

  • By: Karen Kondazian
  • Narrated by: Robin Weigert
  • Length: 8 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 479
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 436
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 433

The Whip is inspired by the true story of Charlotte "Charley" Parkhurst (1812-1879) who lived most of her extraordinary life as a man. As a young woman in Rhode Island, she fell in love with a runaway slave and had his child. The destruction of her family drove her west to California, dressed as a man, to track the killer. Charley became a renowned stagecoach driver for Wells Fargo, during the renowned California 'gold rush' days. She killed a famous outlaw, had a secret love affair, and lived with a housekeeper who, unaware of her true sex, fell in love with her.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Too too sad for me to finish, so a personal review

  • By Kate+Mitchell Powell on 12-25-13

A Most Unusual Saga

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-14

What did you love best about The Whip?

How this woman overcame the gender bias of her time by assuming the role of man who was ultimately admired by "his" peers. This is not a transsexual story but one of turning major defeats in life to an incredible heroic success.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Well of course, the lead character was the entire thrust. Maybe I liked her/him because this was based on a true story, not just fabricated.

Have you listened to any of Robin Weigert’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I'm not sure that I have so cannot answer this one.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

The only barriers in life are those we accept.

Any additional comments?

A very worthwhile audiobook. Loved it.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Pearl That Broke Its Shell

  • By: Nadia Hashimi
  • Narrated by: Gin Hammond
  • Length: 16 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,166
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,052
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,057

Nadia Hashimi's literary debut is a searing tale of powerlessness, fate, and the freedom to control one's own fate that combines the cultural flavor and emotional resonance of the works of Khaled Hosseini, Jhumpa Lahiri, and Lisa See. In Kabul, 2007, Rahima and her sisters can only sporadically attend school and can rarely leave the house. Their only hope lies in the ancient custom of bacha posh, which allows young Rahima to dress and be treated as a boy until she is of marriageable age.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Inner View of Hidden Women

  • By SydSavvy on 01-04-15

A Story you will never forget

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes I would. This audiobook has so much to offer in terms of engaging the listener and creating images in the mind that stir the heart.

What other book might you compare The Pearl That Broke Its Shell to and why?

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Both authors weave multiple stories within the story and show how other cultures live, love, and believe. The social fabrics are so well presented in these two novels yet speak volumes as to the underlying truth. Different from us in America, yet utterly human and with the same emotions and desires.

What does Gin Hammond bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Well, her narrative style was superlative. Although she doesn't have the masculine voice timber, her style made the male characters believable anyhow and gave them depth. I think just reading the book wouldn't have been nearly as visceral as her narrative provided.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Follow your heart.

Any additional comments?

I hated for the story to end. I'll probably listen again and it'll be all fresh and new and wonderful once more. Excellent story and great writing.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • In the Plex

  • How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives
  • By: Steven Levy
  • Narrated by: L. J. Ganser
  • Length: 19 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,010
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,938
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,946

Few companies in history have ever been as successful and as admired as Google, the company that has transformed the Internet and become an indispensable part of our lives. How has Google done it? Veteran technology reporter Steven Levy was granted unprecedented access to the company, and in this revelatory book he takes listeners inside Google headquarters - the Googleplex - to explain how Google works.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Just ok for me

  • By Everyday Mom on 04-23-11

Who Knew?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-14

What made the experience of listening to In the Plex the most enjoyable?

This book put "faces" upon the Google facade removing the veil of mystery. Understanding more about "do no evil" as a company mantra was very significant to me along with the basic thread of user services that was explored and amplified in the book. The ubiquity of Google overshadows the fact that real people are doing real work behind the scenes and the story covered that so very nicely, putting humanity first.

What did you like best about this story?

I honestly don't have an answer for that. Demystifying Google probably.

What does L. J. Ganser bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

The book is heavy left brain data so a narrative really enhances the experience whereas the right brain, in reading might give up totally! LOL

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Heavens no! I enjoyed it in bits and drabs while working.

Any additional comments?

Good expanded material and interview at the end of the book which was a surprising bonus and appreciated by this listener.

  • The Book Thief

  • By: Markus Zusak
  • Narrated by: Allan Corduner
  • Length: 13 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21,868
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,723
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,755

It's just a small story really, about, among other things, a girl, some words, an accordionist, some fanatical Germans, a Jewish fist-fighter, and quite a lot of thievery. Set during World War II in Germany, Markus Zusak's groundbreaking new novel is the story of Liesel Meminger, a foster girl living outside of Munich. Liesel scratches out a meager existence for herself by stealing when she encounters something she can't resist: books.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Glad I took a chance.

  • By Robert on 08-20-11

Utterly Engaging from Beginning to End

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I sure would recommend this book! The story is without doubt, a full featured one that never leaves the reader/listener wanting. Great descriptive phrases and imagery marking every paragraph with richness.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Death, or maybe the soul retriever is a better name, was the central character for me. His narrative was the thread that kept the story flowing in perfect sync.

Have you listened to any of Allan Corduner’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Not that I recall. Corduner's reading of this book was sublime however and he managed to make each character come alive through nuances and inflections.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

I don't recall an extreme reaction to the story other than in the first few pages when "death" began the narrative. I was nervous as to how this was going to unfold and whether or not to continue. I am so glad I stuck with it as the book is quite marvelous and well done.

Any additional comments?

It's easy to see why this is still high on the best seller list. I'll probably listen to it again at some point for the sheer enjoyment of revisiting all the characters once again.

  • Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue

  • The Untold History of English
  • By: John McWhorter
  • Narrated by: John McWhorter
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,931
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,480
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,458

A survey of the quirks and quandaries of the English language, focusing on our strange and wonderful grammar. Why do we say "I am reading a catalog" instead of "I read a catalog"? Why do we say "do" at all? Is the way we speak a reflection of our cultural values? Delving into these provocative topics and more, Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue distills hundreds of years of fascinating lore into one lively history.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great for casual linguists

  • By Anderson on 01-11-10

"Meaningless Do"

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-14

Where does Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

I loved this book! Honestly. It was marvelously entertaining, believe it or not, and had me laughing even when I didn't totally understand all the language nuances. By that I mean, I'm certainly not an English Major by any stretch. What captured my fancy was how McWhorter harkened to the word "do" in our language has having absolutely no genuine meaning whatsoever and thereby calling it "meaningless do." We all use "do" every day. But it has no value. It now haunts me when I use the word!

What other book might you compare Our Magnificent Bastard Tongue to and why?

I'm stumped on this question. I love books and words so anything well written, well narrated qualifies.

Have you listened to any of John McWhorter’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Not that I am aware of, narrator wise. He had good presence.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

How did we end up like this in speech?

Any additional comments?

Don't be wary of this book just because of the title. It's a real gem.

  • The Double Helix

  • A Personal Account of the Discovery of the Structure of DNA
  • By: James D. Watson
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner, Roger Clark
  • Length: 4 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 612
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 523
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 528

By identifying the structure of DNA, the molecule of life, Francis Crick and James Watson revolutionized biochemistry and won themselves a Nobel Prize. At the time, Watson was only 24, a young scientist hungry to make his mark. His uncompromisingly honest account of the heady days of their thrilling sprint against other world-class researchers to solve one of science's greatest mysteries gives a dazzlingly clear picture of a world of brilliant scientists with great gifts, very human ambitions, and bitter rivalries.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous book!

  • By A. Lai on 03-04-12

Scholary but Fascinating

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-14

What made the experience of listening to The Double Helix the most enjoyable?

Despite the scientific bent, this book put the human first and into perspective so that the listener could gain an understanding of the material presented. It is, after all, the people who make the discoveries and therefore have a story to impart.

What other book might you compare The Double Helix to and why?

Carl Sagan's works come to mind in a totally different venue but still, he managed to get some serious ideas across in a charming way.

What does Grover Gardner and Roger Clark bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Definitely. They did an excellent job. I would have probably dismissed the printed version out of hand.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I can't say I was moved in the normal sense of the word. Impressed by the dedication of the individuals who strove to solve the Double Helix riddle certainly had some emotion.

Any additional comments?

The length of the audiobook and narration of the story are a very good fit. I had little difficulty in keeping up with the material and actually hated for it to end.

  • The Goldfinch

  • By: Donna Tartt
  • Narrated by: David Pittu
  • Length: 32 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,921
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,498
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 24,520

The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present-day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity. It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a 13-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow

  • By j phillips on 05-28-17

A very good story!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-14

Where does The Goldfinch rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

The bottom half since I rarely do read or listen to novels but I did like this one.

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Goldfinch?

It would be hard not to include the art gallery scene as described when the bomb went off and killed most of the visitors. I'm not much into violence but it does set the stage for the material that follows.

Which scene was your favorite?

I can't recall a favorite scene per se.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Heavens no! I listened to it while working at my gardening jobs for weeks. It's a lengthy affair and at 39 hours (if memory serves) who could listen in one sitting! LOL

Any additional comments?

I could easily see why The Goldfinch has been on the Best Seller List for a while.