LISTENER

Todd

  • 15
  • reviews
  • 79
  • helpful votes
  • 105
  • ratings
  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 208,796
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 194,939
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 194,532

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I’m sorry I waited so long to read this book.

  • By Julie W. Capell on 05-27-14

A great romp thru the 80s

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-30-18

If you were a kid in the 80s and liked video games and D&D, you'll enjoy this book. I sure did.

  • Thomas Merton on the 12 Degrees of Humility

  • By: Thomas Merton
  • Narrated by: Thomas Merton
  • Length: 7 hrs and 9 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24

You are invited into the classroom in which Thomas Merton delivered some of his most impassioned lectures on a timeless topic. In 1962 at Gethsemani Abbey, Thomas Merton taught an extraordinary course on the heart of Benedictine spirituality.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Today, it is hard to find spiritual direction

  • By Sunni Baran on 11-15-18

Good subject weak delivery

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-08-18

I must have missed that this is not a book but a bunch of recordings of Merton teaching a class of monks. Still, good subject but hard to hear all the participants. Also, the introduction to the work is at the end of the recording. It sure would have been nice or have it at the beginning.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Hero with a Thousand Faces

  • By: Joseph Campbell
  • Narrated by: Arthur Morey, John Lee, Susan Denaker
  • Length: 14 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,744
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,580
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,567

Since its release in 1949, The Hero with a Thousand Faces has influenced millions of readers by combining the insights of modern psychology with Joseph Campbell's revolutionary understanding of comparative mythology. In this book, Campbell outlines the Hero's Journey, a universal motif of adventure and transformation that runs through virtually all of the world's mythic traditions. He also explores the Cosmogonic Cycle, the mythic pattern of world creation and destruction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Meaningful and thought-provoking

  • By Learner on 02-09-16

Amazing book, but long

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-27-18

I really enjoyed this book. His idea of the hero myth is culturally universal is well known in today's society, at least at a non-conscious level. The book is based in a legion of anthropologic research and articulated in the language of psychology. Amd while the tendency is to think he treats cherished religious beliefs as myths, he does not. He says a, couple times that I'd you ecamine a myth or religion in thr cold light of day, you miss a lot by shining your Hiesenbergian light of examination.

It can be long and ponderous. But it's worth while slogging through. Thr cumulative effect is stunning. He wraps it all up in a masterful final chapter, summarizing the change to the challenge of the hero in modern times as opposed to the hero's challenge pre-Enlightenment.

  • Proof of Heaven

  • A Neurosurgeon's Near-Death Experience and Journey into the Afterlife
  • By: Eben Alexander
  • Narrated by: Eben Alexander
  • Length: 6 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,602
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,154
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,176

On November 10, 2008, Dr. Eben Alexander was driven into coma by a disease so lethal that only 1 in 10,000,000 survive. Seven days later, he awakened with memories of a fantastic odyssey deep into another realm that were more real than this earthly one - memories that included meeting a deceased birth sister he had never known existed. Dr. Alexander deployed all his knowledge as a scientist to find out whether his mind could have played a trick on him. In its shutdown state, there was no way it could have.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling

  • By Kelly on 10-27-12

Seems a bit self absorbed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-18

this book seems a bit self-absorbed for me. And his take on Christianity seems a bit New Age like. Well I'm sure he had a great experience and it was interesting to hear about it I really did not need all the specific details about his medical condition. The audience for this book is clearly to be for the people that are agnostic or atheist. If you're not if you have a particular set of beliefs you may be disappointed by this book.

  • Welcome to the Orthodox Church

  • An Introduction to Eastern Christianity
  • By: Frederica Mathewes-Green
  • Narrated by: Frederica Mathewes-Green
  • Length: 13 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 130
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 116

Welcome to the Orthodox Church - its history, theology, worship, spirituality, and daily life. This friendly guide provides a comprehensive introduction to Orthodoxy, but with a twist: listeners learn by making a series of visits to a fictitious church, and get to know the faith as new Christians did for most of history, by immersion. Mathews-Green provides commentary and explanations on everything from how to "venerate" an icon, the Orthodox understanding of the atonement, to the Lenten significance of tofu.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Oh my! Everything I hoped, and SO much more!

  • By Jrhd437 on 03-21-17

Very interesting

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-17

I really enjoyed this book. If any book can give you a feel for a church, this book goes a long way down that path. The only way to really know is to go and be part, but this book gets you as close as one can get without actually being there. She hits on all the theological and historical key points along the way.

  • Heretics

  • By: G.K. Chesterton
  • Narrated by: Philippe Duquenoy
  • Length: 6 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 74

Chesterton's compilation of essays in Heretics discusses the difference in Orthodoxy and Heretics, rational vs. irrational, and denial vs. affirmation. He questions the reason for the existence of man and the universe and calls out many prominent figures in the artistic and literary fields for their unorthodox ideas; thus labeling them heretics. He will have you thinking of favorite authors like Rudyard Kipling, Oscar Wilde, and H.G. Wells in a new light, challenging their ideals and morals.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Typical Chesterton

  • By Todd on 08-03-17

Typical Chesterton

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-17

This is a collection of Chesterton essays railing against his perceived enemies of his day. It's interesting because he writes so well. But some of the names and some of the issues will be lost on a read of today.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • When the Church Was Young

  • Voices of the Early Fathers
  • By: Marcellino D'Ambrosio
  • Narrated by: Marcellino D'Ambrosio
  • Length: 9 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 580
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 508
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 510

Marcellino D'Ambrosio dusts off what might have been just dry theology to bring you the exciting stories of great heroes such as Ambrose, Augustine, Basil, Athanasius, John Chrysostom, and Jerome. These brilliant, embattled, and sometimes eccentric men defined the biblical canon, hammered out the Creed, and gave us our understanding of sacraments and salvation. It is they who preserved the rich legacy of the early Church for us.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Masterful summary of the early Church Fathers

  • By Mike C on 08-22-14

Enjoyed it as a stating place

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-10-17

A good swing through the early church, a starter for more in depth study. A worthy read.

  • The Complete Infidel's Guide to the Koran

  • By: Robert Spencer
  • Narrated by: Lloyd James
  • Length: 7 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 437
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 367
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 365

The Koran: It may be the most controversial book in the world. Some see it as a paean to peace, others call it a violent mandate for worldwide Islamic supremacy. How can one book lead to such dramatically different conclusions?

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not exactly what I was looking for

  • By Todd on 12-04-13

Not exactly what I was looking for

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-13

Choosing this book, I thought I was going to get insight into how Islam works for Muslims in helping them connect to God, with an in-depth look at the Koran in a manner that explains Koranic concepts to non-Mulsims. That was not exactly the case.

While this book is very much in-depth and meticulously written and soundly argued, there is very little about the spiritual or mystical aspects of Islam. It is very clear in its forward or preface that this is a cautionary book about the entrenched violence, disdain for the infidel and outright deception that is sactioned in the Koran. How Koranic verses are very clear and often repeated in their hatred of the infidel and how Muslims are compelled by the Koran to subdue all to Islam by sword or subjugation, not matter what.

I did appreciate learning about the Koran, its compilation, Muhammad and the 7th century environment in which Islam was first proselytized. Spencer hits on all the high points of concern for Christians and Jews, women and of course terrorism. He gives Koranic references constantly, including the commentary of the Hadith as well as many Muslim scholars and theologian's points of view on the Koranic verses. As well, there are interesting biographical elements to Muhammad's story here too.

So the book is extremely rich in knowledge. And for that I am thankful and enjoyed learning about Islam. But it was painful to wade through the basic tenant of the book, that infidels are in grave danger. What Spencer never squares is the fact that hundreds of millions of Muslims (22% of world population according to Wikipedia) live in peace throughout the world, with no intention of Jihad.

The final nail in the coffin is that in his conclusion, Spencer talks about the Dutch politician Geert Wilders, who has alarmist views on Islam and has been often liked to a Nazi in his views on how to deal with Islam. If you are thinking of reading this book, just take a look at the titles of Spencer's other 12 books on Islam (I wish I did). You'll get the idea. If that's what you're looking for, then this book is for you. If you are looking for insight into the spiritual of Islam, best keep looking.

48 of 67 people found this review helpful

The Practice of the Presence of God audiobook cover art
  • The Practice of the Presence of God

  • Pure Gold Audio Classics
  • By: Brother Lawrence
  • Narrated by: Charlie Glaize
  • Length: 2 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 36

First published in French in 1692, The Practice of the Presence of God is a classic for everyone who has a heart that is hungry for more of God - whose "soul thirsts for God, for the living God".

Amid his pots and pans, the author, Brother Lawrence, became so noted for his serenity and joy while he worked at the most menial kitchen tasks that cardinals and theologians came to see him to learn his secret. Even the pope of his day is said to have visited him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Every day inspiration

  • By Anonymous User on 06-19-11

Glad to Delete this file from my device

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-13

In the couple of years I have used Audible, I have generally had a great experience. I've really enjoyed most each and every book I've used from Audible. But this book was abysmal. I could not wait to finish it and took pleasure in deleting it from the device.

Let me start out by saying the only fault Audible shares is adding this recording to their library. While the book has a great message of spirituality from the late 17th century, the production almost kills any benefit the message of Brother Lawrence imparts. The narrator reads the text like some kind of self-help salesman, brimming with forced enthusiasm in an attempt to bring home the message. Then, when reading quotes/letters of Brother Lawrence, the narrator does so in some kind of creepy old man voice that sounds like the Crypt-Keeper. As well, the product appears choppy, cutting off mid-story in the transition between chapter 1 and 2.

In the spirit of "Practicing the Presence of God", I would like to offer up my suffering, of listening to a butchering of Bother Lawrence's message, to God. The suffering has been plentiful and a tribute to God and trust in his plan. But if you are a looking for a sign-post on your path to a closer relationship with God, save yourself abundant suffering at the ineptitude of the producers of this work and take another path to Brother Lawrence's message.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Cunning Man

  • The Cunning Man
  • By: Robertson Davies
  • Narrated by: Frederick Davidson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 28

Should I have taken the false teeth?" This is what Dr. Jonathan Hullah, a former police surgeon, thinks after he watches Father Hobbes die in front of the High Altar at Toronto's St. Aidan's on the morning of Good Friday. How did the good father die? We do not learn the answer until the very end of this "Case Book" of a man's rich and highly observant life.

But we learn much more about many things, and especially about Dr. Hullah.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • What a shame!

  • By victoria on 01-21-11

Great book and reader, bad recording

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-05-12

Loved the story and the erudite style of Robertson Davies. It is his. Typical engaging, witty style that mocks all his characters while romping through the story. Lots of classic references to the arts, music and literature in a way as to open them to the unaware, such as myself.

Sadly the recording is flawed. Not so much one cannot enjoy the story, but it is rather annoying. Chapters get two minutes in and them begin again with no warning. This is a bit disconcerting, leaving the listener wondering if he missed something. Also, it appears to be a hashing together of various efforts as the narrators voice and tone seem to change from section to section. Still, the story is good and the narrator effective. But the production is poor.

Id love to give this 5 stars but cannot due to the production.