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pierre-luc

Arnprior, ON, Canada
  • 20
  • reviews
  • 100
  • helpful votes
  • 20
  • ratings
  • Dangerous Ground

  • By: Josh Lanyon
  • Narrated by: Adrian Bisson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 140
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 131
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 128

Special Agents for the Department of Diplomatic Security, Taylor MacAllister and Will Brandt have been partners and best friends for three years, but everything changed the night Taylor admitted the truth about his feelings for Will. But it's complicated... Taylor agreed to a camping trip in the High Sierras - despite the fact that he hates camping - because Will wants a chance to save their partnership.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great story, great narration

  • By KC on 11-21-13

Not one if his best - Just ok

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-14

Hmm, the headline is a bit harsh but 50 characters don't leave much, so let me elaborate.

From the publishing date, I gather that this is an earlier work of the author (I may be wrong), and it seems to be that it lacks the strengths of other Lanyon books. While often the author's books are formulaic, the quality of the writing and the variety of styles (fantasy, Noir, espionage) provide the extra oomph for a 4th star. This one fell flat. The main characters have little personality, beyond being handsome. Their relationship is very superficially described, and the plot is thin.

The reading performance by Mr. Bisson is fine. It is not what detracted from the experience.

  • In From the Cold: The I Spy Stories

  • I Spy Something, Volume 1
  • By: Josh Lanyon
  • Narrated by: Alexander J. Masters
  • Length: 6 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 209
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 192
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 191

Espionage was always a game, but now British spy Mark Hardwicke wants to retire and settle down with ex-lover Dr. Stephen Thorpe - if Stephen will have him. Unfortunately, Stephen has other plans - and so do the terrorists who want Mark dead.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfection

  • By Heather on 10-14-13

Well-done, not fully engaging for me

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-14

I wish to first note the wonderful performance by Alexander Masters, whose British voice perfectly fit the narrator. Josh Lanyon also did a very good job using British turns of phrase where appropriate, to further delineate the main character.

The story and romance are fine, and standard for Josh Lanyon who normally delivers quality writing.

I did find the main character difficult to care for, especially in contrast to the more endearing love interest. I found it hard to understand what had driven the characters together in the first place, and made them willing to rekindle a relationship.

Overall, while not a stand-out, it is a recommended read for those who enjoy the genre or the author.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Who We Are

  • By: TJ Klune
  • Narrated by: Charlie David
  • Length: 12 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 539
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 513

Bear, Otter, and the Kid survived last summer with their hearts and souls intact. They've moved into the Green Monstrosity, and Bear is finally able to admit his love for the man who saved him from himself. But that's not the end of their story. How could it be? The boys find that life doesn't stop just because they got their happily ever after. There's still the custody battle for the Kid. The return of Otter's parents. A first trip to a gay bar. The Kid goes to therapy, and Mrs. Paquinn decides that Bigfoot is real.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Good story, narrator needs a dictionary

  • By Qwyattguy on 02-10-17

Will please those who liked the series' first book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-26-14

This a well-done follow-up to the original book, Bear, Otter and the Kid. It features the same characters, at a slightly later time in their life.

I appreciated that the main character, whose POV drives the narration, had grown up a little . While he remains a bit self-centered and whiney (i.e. in character, so not necessarily a flaw in itself), it is a relief to see some personal growth.

I have to admit the second half of the book sees drama laid in a bit thick, but overall it is an enjoyable journey.

Charlie David's performance is fine.

  • Tigers and Devils

  • By: Sean Kennedy
  • Narrated by: Paul Morey
  • Length: 15 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 188
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 176
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 178

The most important things in Simon Murray’s life are football, friends, and film - in that order. His friends despair of him ever meeting someone, but despite his loneliness, Simon is cautious about looking for more. Then his best friends drag him to a party, where he barges into a football conversation and ends up defending the honour of star forward Declan Tyler - unaware that the athlete is present. In that first awkward meeting, neither man has any idea they will change each other's lives forever.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • i loved the story but not the narrator. Sorry.

  • By stephanie on 06-13-13

Good enough - but not quite hitting it for me

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-13

In book form, this title was a fan favourite within the m/m romance genre. So I had high hopes when it came out in audio form. In the end, this was decent but just did not move me much. On the plus side, I appreciated the setting (Australian football) and the author is gifted enough, so no complaint about the workmanship. On the negative, I just did not get the main characters. The lead is pretty whiney, the love interest not quite fully-fleshed out. And I also grow irritated when a lot of the romantic angst stems from a lack or refusal to communicate, and the characters never learn from that mistake. We could have saved a hundred pages of needless angst with a simple phone call...that just is unrealistic (or if realistic, too fricking annoying!).

The audio is fine but it is unfortunate that the narration is not done by an Australian. Australia is a key element of the atmosphere in the book.

So overall, I would still recommend the book, as it is a quality entry in the genre - though others may like it more than I did.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Promises Made Under Fire

  • By: Charlie Cochrane
  • Narrated by: Kevin Stillwell
  • Length: 2 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 50

Lieutenant Tom Donald envies everything about fellow officer Frank Foden - his confidence, his easy manner with the men in the trenches, the affectionate letters from his wife. Frank shares these letters happily, drawing Tom into a vicarious friendship with a woman he's never met. Although the bonds of friendship forged under fire are strong, Tom can't be so open with Frank - he's attracted to men and could never confess that to anyone.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Great Story...

  • By Donald on 02-28-13

Sweet novella - very good narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-04-13

This is a sweet romance. The author successfully casts you into the cadence of an epistolary relationship set in the years of World War I. Sufficiently self-contained but leaves you wanting (in a good way) to know more about the characters and their lives.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • An Irish Country Doctor

  • A Novel
  • By: Patrick Taylor
  • Narrated by: John Keating
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,718
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,319
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,324

Barry Laverty, M.B., can barely find the village of Ballybucklebo on a map when he first sets out to seek gainful employment there, but already he knows that there is nowhere he would rather live than in the emerald hills and dales of Northern Ireland. The proud owner of a spanking-new medical degree and little else in the way of worldly possessions, Barry jumps at the chance to secure a position as an assistant in a small rural practice.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Fun Book

  • By Sara on 10-24-14

Heart-warming and genuine

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-13

My husband and I both loved this book, which is the first in a series of 6 or 7 at this point.

The characterizations are excellent - the main cast ls believable and endearing, with vibrant secondary characters. The book provides a wonderful sense of place, rural Ireland, and time, the 60s.

Quickly, we were drawn in and felt like the local villagers were our own neighbours as we got to know their ups and downs, quirks, dreams and doubts. Patrick Taylor successfully conveys an uplifting humanity without falling into sappiness.

The narration by John Keating, bringing a clear, well-paced Irish voice, is wonderful and makes it a pleasure to listen to.

Give this one a try...and enjoy the ride for the series.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • 40 Souls to Keep

  • By: Libby Drew
  • Narrated by: Charles Carr
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 136
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 128

Seven years ago, Jase awoke with the mystical power to heal people - and no memory of his past. The only clue to his identity is the number 40 tattooed on his arm. Driven by a mission he doesn't understand, Jase follows his visions to those he's meant to save. He is convinced that the 40th person he's drawn to - a little girl named Macy Pearl - is the key to finally learning the truth.… Social worker Lucas Jacobson has made a promise to protect Macy, orphaned when her parents were murdered. So when Jase shows up in Naples claiming he's there to heal the child, Lucas is wary, despite his attraction to the enigmatic stranger.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This One Surprised Me

  • By Bosco on 06-10-18

Decent but not quite fulfilling supernatural-wise

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-13

This book was decently writtem, and decently narrated. It may turn some people's cranks more than it did mine. So the 3 stars are not an indictment, just that I found it average, perhaps I would have granted a half-star more if Audible let me. :-)

If it helps others, I will flag the two things that held me back some. First, the supernatural angle. The premise (which I won't describe in details so as not to spoil) is intriguing...but it does not really grow, which is frustrating because the author drops little hints here and there that suggest that either it will later on (and it doesn't) or that she at least has envisioned a richer world (which she doesn't share with us listeners). I was convinced there was a well-imagined coherent world somewhere...I just did not see it within the pages. Second, I found the lead protagonist hard to believe as a male voice. This is one of those books I wouldn't be surprised was written as a male/female romance, but got switched late in the game to fill a niche. The writing is not offensive, or irritating...the characterization just did not gel for me.

So overall, an average rating but, again, it is of decent quality and different listeners may find it more to their taste.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • A Reason to Believe

  • By: Diana Copland
  • Narrated by: Jack LeFleur
  • Length: 10 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 792
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 755
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 760

Detective Matthew Bennett doesn't believe in ghosts. So when the spirit of a murdered child leads him to her body, he's shaken to the core - and taken off the case. Unable to explain his vision, or to let go of the investigation, Matthew turns to renowned medium Kiernan Fitzpatrick. Though he has doubts about Kiernan's claims to communicate with the dead, Matt is nevertheless drawn to the handsome psychic, who awakens feelings he thought were long-buried.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Addictive listening

  • By A.R. on 01-03-13

Solid mix of romance and mystery

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-24-13

i would rank this in the clear top tier of male/male romances. The characters are likeable enough without being perfect, and there is an actual plot around which the romance grows. I admit I prefer straight-forward books (suspense, historical, mysteries, whatnot) that have a male/male relationship rather than romances with a touch of a plot.

So this one really was my cup of tea.

The writing is of good quality and the narration was very well done too, as Jack LeFleur always professionally delivers.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • A Book of Tongues

  • Hexslinger, Book 1
  • By: Gemma Files
  • Narrated by: Gordon Mackenzie
  • Length: 10 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 57
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 55
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 55

Two years after the Civil War, Pinkerton agent Ed Morrow has gone undercover with one of the weird West's most dangerous outlaw gangs - the troop led by "Reverend" Asher Rook, ex-Confederate chaplain turned "hexslinger," and his notorious lieutenant (and lover) Chess Pargeter. Morrow's task: get close enough to map the extent of Rook's power, then bring that knowledge back to help Professor Joachim Asbury unlock the secrets of magic itself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Good book but way too explicit.

  • By Cliff on 08-29-13

An interesting departure from Westerns

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-12

Many different periods have been re-imagined with magic (medieval of course, or Victorian England with Steampunk), but this was my first Western/Magic hybrid. Odd but well crafted, and internally consistent. Kudos to the author for bringing forth this original setting.

The world depicted is violent and crass, but believable given the premise, and populated by interesting characters. The narration is very well done, with diverse accents and tones that fit the characters and make them easily distinguishable.

The prologue sounds a bit like Mayan Mythology 101 on acid, but don't let it discourage you; it is not at all representative of the rest of the writing style of the novel - which is much more straightforward.

The emotional relationship between several of the male leads is important to the story and key to understanding their motivations and actions, but this is far from a romance novel.

Overall a recommended read (or listen!).

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • 1632

  • Ring of Fire, Book 1
  • By: Eric Flint
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 19 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,921
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,757
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,767

New York Times best-selling author Eric Flint has received glowing critical praise for his Ring of Fire alternate history series. In this first installment, a West Virginia town is transported from the year 2000 to 1631 Germany at the height of the Thirty Years’ War. Thrust into conflict, the town residents must also contend with moral issues such as who should be considered a citizen.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • NOT ALL THAT BAD

  • By Randall on 11-26-18

If only it was written for adults...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-12

Ok, the headline may be harsh, but it explains why a good performance and a good story manage to combine into a sum that's less than the individual parts.

The writing is decent, if unremarkable. The historical research adequate. The pacing ok. What's wrong then? Well, this is a time-travel book confronting modern Americans with Enlightenment Europeans in the midst of a religious war. So, if you abstract from the lack of 1-any discussion (even in passing) of religion, 2-any serious conflict between past and present values, 3-any character (modern or past) being remotely phased by the juxtaposition of times and 4-the lack of character development or ambiguity, then you will love this book.

Since I want this review to be helpful to prospective readers, I have to reiterate that it's not bad (if it stunk there would not be several sequels), it's just that the plot description suggested (at least to me) more thoughtful entertainment than what feels like a formulaic TV script.

51 of 58 people found this review helpful