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Henry Brandon

BLOOMFIELD, NEW JERSEY, US
  • 15
  • reviews
  • 6
  • helpful votes
  • 15
  • ratings
  • The Heritage

  • Black Athletes, a Divided America, and the Politics of Patriotism
  • By: Howard Bryant
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 11 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 83
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 72

Today, sports arenas have been transformed into staging grounds for American patriotism and the hero worship of law enforcement. Teams wear camouflage jerseys to honor those who serve; police officers throw out first pitches; soldiers surprise their families with homecomings at halftime. Sports and politics are decidedly entwined. But as journalist Howard Bryant reveals, this has always been more complicated for black athletes, who from the start were committing a political act simply by being on the field.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A NPR Fresh Air brought me here

  • By Chuck Sadler on 02-07-19

What is The Heritage?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-18

Well you’re going to have to read the book to find out. But if you’re watching sports today or playing sports, you’re doing yourself and most likely the community a disservice by “not” familiarizing yourself with the history, legacy & significance of The Heritage.

Learn what the author has to say about iconic athletes and their commitment to or lack thereof, to The Heritage. I won’t recount their names, as you know them sometimes by only their initials or just their first names. But do we praise their minds, or are we only fascinated with their bodies?

Oh & this pseudo Patriotism thing ... it’s in there.

  • Born a Crime

  • Stories from a South African Childhood
  • By: Trevor Noah
  • Narrated by: Trevor Noah
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 112,894
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 104,549
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 104,051

One of the comedy world's fastest-rising stars tells his wild coming of age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great book and perfect narration

  • By Marilyn Armstrong on 12-15-16

Entertaining & Wonderfully Delivered

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

We all know about South African Apartheid, but all too often the toll it took on the people, the families, are stories that go untold. Trevor gives us an insight into that world by recanting his youth with his mom. Make no mistake, this is “his” story (and others certainly have a different perspective), but his storytelling takes you to the world that he grew up in.

His love for and early life with his mother demonstrates the strength and vision she had for herself and her son. Her love for her family and her God, drove and sustained her, through some very trying situations and set the foundation of who her son came to be. A very entertaining history.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Color of Money

  • Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap
  • By: Mehrsa Baradaran
  • Narrated by: Lisa Reneé Pitts
  • Length: 15 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 254
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 226

When the Emancipation Proclamation was signed in 1863, the black community owned less than one percent of the United States' total wealth. More than 150 years later, that number has barely budged. The Color of Money pursues the persistence of this racial wealth gap by focusing on the generators of wealth in the black community: black banks. The catch-22 of black banking is that the very institutions needed to help communities escape the deep poverty caused by discrimination and segregation inevitably became victims of that same poverty.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Both a Bridge and a Battle Cry

  • By Darwin8u on 09-26-17

Premise Misguided, but Some Good Nuggets

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-27-18

Wondered why the author chose to focus on banks as the only mechanism for building wealth and maintained a steadfast adherence to sticking with a model that doesn’t quite work for our community, but when you think about the message discussed in the Miseducation of the Negro by Carter G. Woodson, you have to ask yourself if the approach to wealth building that supported the White community, should be emulated by the African-American community.

The author however does a decent job of chronicling the African experience in America and how they were financially abused throughout that experience. Also bringing in notable figures in history and their positions. But the ultimate position taken is flawed. Continuing down a path that is systematically rigged against you, is insanity. Finding ways to innovate, which African Americans have managed to do, should be explored and enhanced.

  • The Mis-Education of the Negro

  • By: Carter Goodwin Woodson
  • Narrated by: Anthony Stewart
  • Length: 3 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 932
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 761
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 763

Here is an unapologetic look into the factors that have caused so many Blacks to think and act in the negative way they do towards themselves and others. This timely body of work is from a man well versed in the American educational system, as well as educational systems throughout the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Classic and Unexpected Delight

  • By Theo Horesh on 02-28-13

From the Father of Black History

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-06-18

1933! I’m always amazed at the period of time these ideas were forged, the state of Black America and still, the periods of disenfranchisement that followed the penning of this work and still plagues the community til this day. Comics once joked if you ever want to keep information from Black people, just put it in a book😪. This guidance has been around for sometime and it has hidden safely in a book since 1933. Take the time and journey with a true educator and historian who accurately depicts the plight of the African-Americans then & now. Don’t let your kids be unaware of the lessons contained herein.

  • The Souls of Black Folk

  • By: W. E. B. Du Bois
  • Narrated by: Mirron Willis
  • Length: 8 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 964
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 845
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 845

“The problem of the twentieth century is the problem of the color line,” writes Du Bois, in one of the most prophetic works in all of American literature. First published in 1903, this collection of 15 essays dared to describe the racism that prevailed at that time in America—and to demand an end to it. Du Bois’ writing draws on his early experiences, from teaching in the hills of Tennessee, to the death of his infant son, to his historic break with the conciliatory position of Booker T. Washington.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Essays of 'life and love and strife and failure'

  • By ESK on 02-08-13

Intelligent but a difficult read!!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-18

I’ve had this book for ever, but never read it. Just a hard book to get through. But knew the author was brilliant and wanted to get a sense of his perspectives. This book is a combination of short stories, poems, history, intelligent prose that all converge to tell the story of Black Folk in America during this time. Du Bois introduces his Talented Tenth concept and sets the stage for furtherance of this concept.

As difficult & challenging as this book is to read, it is equally challenging to listen to. But Du Bois’ intellect and insight are undeniable. Definitely a must read, but be prepared to be challenged with language & examples. But learn from a genius at a time when few people of color were able to demonstrate such ... of any race, actually.

  • Slavery by Another Name

  • The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans from the Civil War to World War II
  • By: Douglas A. Blackmon
  • Narrated by: Dennis Boutsikaris
  • Length: 15 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,037
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 878
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 870

In this groundbreaking historical expose, Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an Age of Neoslavery that thrived from the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Powerful book!

  • By Kristi R. on 04-08-14

A Precursor to “The New Jim Crow”

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-18

In the annals of history, this is a hidden story about the continuation of slavery and the dehumanization of the African-American. State sanctioned re-enslavement. The author does a great job telling the story of the systematic re-enslavement, the review by the Federal Government that ultimately opens the door for state sanctioned slavery and the continued boost to the economy on the backs of African-Americans.

Other points highlighted are the strengthening of White supremacy as well as the further subjugation of the African-American citizens. Free, only in name, the population effectively were right back in slavery.

Pay attention to sub-plots involving Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. DuBois, Presidents: Teddy Roosevelt, & Woodrow Wilson. The introduction of the FBI & J. Edgar Hoover and the dichotomy of how the 2nd Amendment was interpreted for White Americans vs African-Americans.

Should be in your library.

  • The Half Has Never Been Told

  • Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
  • By: Edward E. Baptist
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 19 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,550
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,404
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,397

In The Half Has Never Been Told, historian Edward E. Baptist reveals the alarming extent to which slavery shaped our country politically, morally, and most of all, economically. Until the Civil War, our chief form of innovation was slavery. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from their slaves, giving the country a virtual monopoly on the production of cotton, a key raw material of the Industrial Revolution.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • The most definitive history of American slavery;

  • By Robert Fullerton on 01-04-15

A Must Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-20-18

His Story is traditionally told from the perspective of the conqueror, not the conquered. So finding a balanced tale of the true history of slavery. The impact this institution had on the wealth accumulation of not only this Country, but more broadly, Western Civilization as a whole is brought to life in this book by the telling of what transpired with Black bodies.

In this book, you also get an insight into the early political landscape from Revolutionary to Civil War and the men who carried out a doctrine of the expansion of slavery and the need to have Black bodies continuing to fuel America’s expansion.

If your only knowledge of the slave institution is the paragraph or Chapter if you’re lucky, learned in school, do yourself and more importantly your children a favor and expose them to a more balanced telling of this story.

  • We Were Eight Years in Power

  • An American Tragedy
  • By: Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • Narrated by: Beresford Bennett
  • Length: 13 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,657
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,492
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,480

"We were eight years in power" was the lament of Reconstruction-era black politicians as the American experiment in multiracial democracy ended with the return of white supremacist rule in the South. Now Ta-Nehisi Coates explores the tragic echoes of that history in our own time: the unprecedented election of a black president followed by a vicious backlash that fueled the election of the man Coates argues is America's "first white president".

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Repackaged Atlantic Articles, but worth reading

  • By Adam Shields on 10-04-17

From Reconstruction to Donald Trump!!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-17-18

Ta-Nahesi has cemented himself as a story teller moving seamlessly from the personal stories of his life woven in a tale of the topic he’s discussing. This tale of the eight year term of President Obama’s presidency vis-à-vis the eight year period of reconstruction which gave way to Jim Crow and the periods ranging from Jim Crow, to the Civil Rights Movement, to Black Power and ultimately the election of the first African-American President.

In the process Ta-Nahesi discuses the New Jim Crow and his interpretation of the issues Michelle Alexander does an excellent job of shaping in her book. He disagrees a bit, but for my money, her assessment is on point. However his recounting of discussions with the President, are worth the price of admission & highlights the perspectives that shaped the President’s ideas about race in America and shapes the fate that we now find ourselves in.

  • Black Against Empire

  • The History and Politics of the Black Panther Party
  • By: Joshua Bloom, Waldo E. Martin Jr.
  • Narrated by: Ron Butler
  • Length: 18 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 245
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 220
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 216

In Oakland, California, in 1966, community college students Bobby Seale and Huey Newton armed themselves, began patrolling the police, and promised to prevent police brutality. Unlike the Civil Rights Movement that called for full citizenship rights for blacks within the US, the Black Panther Party rejected the legitimacy of the US government and positioned itself as part of a global struggle against American imperialism.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • the explanation of rise and fall Black Panther

  • By Antwine Hurst on 03-24-17

Excellent!! Who Knew??

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-02-18

Of course one knows about the Black Panthers, but does one “really” know about the Black Panthers? Their influences, their alliances and the many influences as the Civil Rights Movement gave way to the Black Power Movement.

This book does an excellent job of telling their story from rise to fall. Perhaps the only shortcoming is the failure to effectively tie in the utilization of drugs to the destruction of their effectiveness. I don’t want to suggest that it was the only reason, but another reason & was totally excluded from consideration.

In any event the lessons are many & the ask in the conclusion as to why no similar insurgency type organization exists today, is just as cogent of an ask, as any in the book. Well done! BTW, the animated story telling is the best that I’ve heard, to-date & this was about my 5th audible.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Black Man, White House

  • An Oral History of the Obama Years
  • By: D. L. Hughley
  • Narrated by: Mia Barron, Cherise Boothe, Ron Butler, and others
  • Length: 9 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 179
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 152

From legendary comedian D. L. Hughley comes a bitingly funny send-up of the Obama years, as "told" by the key political players on both sides of the aisle. What do the Clintons, Republicans, fellow Democrats, and Obama's own family really think of President Barack Obama? Finally, the truth is revealed in this raucously funny "oral history" parody.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever and Hilarious!

  • By Fylynne on 07-14-16

Good But ...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-07-18

Excellent job by DL to construct a story replete with characters from President Obama’s time in office and what they might have said or thought. Even the even tempered responses of what we grew to see from the administration, which left us both frustrated and proud, was brought to life in the dialogue as events were relived.

Unfortunately without knowing for certain, these were just the ingenious creations of DL’s mind. Entertaining, yes, real ... well who knows, but he is a comedian NOT a historian 🤫.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful