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T. Hubbell

Hollywood CA
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  • 7
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  • 5
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  • Panzer Commander

  • The Memoirs of Colonel Hans von Luck
  • By: Hans von Luck, Stephen E. Ambrose (introduction)
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 15 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,841
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,717
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,715

A stunning look at World War II from the other side.... From the turret of a German tank, Colonel Hans von Luck commanded Rommel's 7th and then 21st Panzer Division. El Alamein, Kasserine Pass, Poland, Belgium, Normandy on D-Day, the disastrous Russian front - von Luck fought there with some of the best soldiers in the world. German soldiers. Awarded the German Cross in Gold and the Knight's Cross, von Luck writes as an officer and a gentleman.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Reads like Forrest Gump ( a fiction )

  • By Randall on 11-08-16

The other side of the front line: WWII

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-16-15

Frontline World War II German panzer commander, Who in France Normandie north Africa in the Russian friend, is a remarkable first-hand account of the unit on unit division on division soldier on soldier battles that made up World War II. It is amazing how little the British and Americans contributed to the overall outcome of the war. The Germans were already in fall retreat in 1941 with the loss of Stalingrad.

It is possible, even probable that Russia would have eventually won the war against the third Reich alone.

But with the fall of north Africa every German
Officer knew that the war was lost.

They fought on to the last man,
Because it was their duty.

1 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • A First-Rate Madness

  • Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness
  • By: Nassir Ghaemi
  • Narrated by: Sean Runnette
  • Length: 10 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 555
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 491
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 481

Here, Nassir Ghaemi draws from the careers and personal plights of such notable leaders as Lincoln, Churchill, Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr., JFK, and others from the past two centuries to build an argument at once controversial and compelling: the very qualities that mark those with mood disorders—realism, empathy, resilience, and creativity—also make for the best leaders in times of crisis.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A First Rate Journey Into Resilience

  • By Pearl Glacier on 02-19-13

Mental Illness WAS written out of History, until..

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-14

What did you love best about A First-Rate Madness?

Very well written on organized. His writing style is lucid, almost poetic at times. This is no easy feat for someone who I suspect, English was not a first language. He seems to be a compassionate Psychiatrist with a passion for history. Mental illness is to this day, a dirty word, the mentally ill are 'less than.' Historians almost universally ignore the subject. The achievement of some of the great leaders in history are all the more remarkable given the 'handicaps' of Depression, alcoholism and Bi-Polar disorders.

What was one of the most memorable moments of A First-Rate Madness?

Effective psychiatric drugs are of recent origin, getting them to therapeutic levels is no small feat even today. For historic leaders who had to ride of the roller coaster of mania and depression without analysis or medication, the journey to greatness was a torturous path.
Thus the insight of this book, for me, is resilience.

Bill Gates once said that success is a lousy teacher.

In moments of historical crisis, it is often those that have been knocked down time and time again by self inflicted or inherited mental illness that have the resilience to face down crisis one more time.

Which scene was your favorite?

The history of Martin Luther King. King was like a young blue star, burning white hot with a passion for justice and prophetic vision for American, yet he faced fear and death on a daily basis. While mania was the cause of this passion, it might have been part of the actions he took. When the Voting Rights Act of 1964 was passed, King became the
'grand old man' of civil rights. Depression can extinguish even the brightest star.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

That Gandhi, who could relate to, and bring hope to an entire planet, could not relate to his family/son.

Any additional comments?

This is a must read for Historians, Psychiatrists and other mental health / Addiction Professionals. For those who have suffered from mental illness,
or love those who do,
mental illness is not a dirty word, indeed, its fellow traveler, resilience, is something that has come to the rescue of nations more than once.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • President Me

  • The America That's in My Head
  • By: Adam Carolla
  • Narrated by: Adam Carolla
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,098
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,004
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 999

In President Me, Carolla shares his vision for a different, better America free from big issues like big government down to small problems like hotel alarm clock placement. Running on an anti-narcissism platform, President Carolla calls for a return to the values of an earlier time when stew and casserole were on every dinner table and there were no “service dogs” on airplanes. President Me hits right at the heart of what makes our country really annoying, and offers a plan to make all of our lives, but mostly Adam’s, much better.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Hilarious and Painfully True

  • By Tommy on 07-09-14

Phoning it in

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-31-14

If you’ve listened to books by Adam Carolla before, how does this one compare?

Just, "ok"

Was President Me worth the listening time?

I am a fan of the Ace Man, I have all of his books. But in this one he seems to have lost his mojo. His political positions are fun to listen to on the air, but they did not hold up in book form.

Any additional comments?

Good effort, some great jokes and observations but this one will not earn Adan any new fans.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful