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A. Yoshida

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  • 433
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  • Hi Bob!

  • By: Bob Newhart
  • Narrated by: Will Ferrell, Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 34 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,758
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,623
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,603

In Hi Bob!, American icon Bob Newhart gets together one-on-one with a handpicked cohort of luminaries in the world of entertainment, whom he happens to be friends with. Bob gets deep with each performer about their aspirations, their careers, how they got started, and how they grew to be where they are today. They make TV shows, movies, or albums, but they all like telling stories.    

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Lots of vintage audio clips included

  • By Lili on 08-31-18

Good listening to pass the time

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-18

It was a free Audible book, so that wasn't bad. Good for listening to pass the time. Bob is chatting with comedian friends like Will Ferrell, Jimmy Kimmel, Lisa Kudrow, Conan O'Brien, and Sarah Silverman. Sometimes it's humorous, sometimes it's just a conversation on certain topics (like how they got their start and what they did when there was a heckler in the audience).

  • Naked Statistics

  • Stripping the Dread from the Data
  • By: Charles Wheelan
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Davis
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,132
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,833
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,823

From batting averages and political polls to game shows and medical research, the real-world application of statistics continues to grow by leaps and bounds. How can we catch schools that cheat on standardized tests? How does Netflix know which movies you'll like? What is causing the rising incidence of autism? As best-selling author Charles Wheelan shows us in Naked Statistics, the right data and a few well-chosen statistical tools can help us answer these questions and more.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Basic, but very well explained

  • By Philo on 05-17-13

You have to enjoy statistics

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-18

The book provides some good examples to explain statistical concepts, like correlation, probability, standard deviation, and regression analysis. But don't expect to fully understand statistics after finishing this book. There are also mentions of numbers and calculations, which doesn't work well in an audio book. The stories about how statistics can be applied is interesting. For example, how to test whether more education means healthier lives and whether attending a prestigious university will result in higher earnings.

  • Sourdough

  • A Novel
  • By: Robin Sloan
  • Narrated by: Therese Plummer
  • Length: 6 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,212
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,142
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,140

Lois Clary is a software engineer at General Dexterity, a San Francisco robotics company with world-changing ambitions. She codes all day and collapses at night, her human contact limited to the two brothers who run the neighborhood hole-in-the-wall from which she orders dinner every evening. Then, disaster! Visa issues. The brothers close up shop, and fast. But they have one last delivery for Lois: their culture, the sourdough starter used to bake their bread. She must keep it alive, they tell her - feed it daily, play it music, and learn to bake with it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Delicious!

  • By Lylo on 11-13-17

Far-fetched Ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

It's an entertaining, light read. Lois Clary is a millennial whose life revolves around her software engineering job. When she's given a sourdough starter (which requires a little more care than her cactus), she slowly starts to have a life beyond her job. There are amusing characters and situations, like Lois joining a Lois Club where the only thing in common among the members is their name. It is unfortunate that the ending diverted from the "feel" of the rest of the book. The ending was a little far-fetched as if the author wanted to finish it with a bang and a twist.

  • I, Robot

  • By: Isaac Asimov
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,093
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,847
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,873

They mustn't harm a human being, they must obey human orders, and they must protect their own existence...but only so long as that doesn't violate rules one and two. With these Three Laws of Robotics, humanity embarked on a bold new era of evolution that would open up enormous possibilities, and unforeseen risks.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Forget the violence - Read this one for the humor

  • By Herb on 02-19-05

Short Stories of Robots Gone Bad

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-18

This book held up pretty well considering it was written in 1950. It's a collection of short stories of robots gone bad as they struggles with obeying the three laws of Robotics. The movie isn't based on any of the stories. It inspired by the book and includes the characters Dr. Susan Calvin and Dr. Alfred Lanning (who are more likable in the movie than in the book).

  • Good Omens

  • By: Neil Gaiman, Terry Pratchett
  • Narrated by: Martin Jarvis
  • Length: 12 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,930
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,396
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14,424

The world will end on Saturday. Next Saturday. Just before dinner, according to The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch, the world's only completely accurate book of prophecies, written in 1655. The armies of Good and Evil are amassing and everything appears to be going according to Divine Plan. Except that a somewhat fussy angel and a fast-living demon are not actually looking forward to the coming Rapture. And someone seems to have misplaced the Antichrist.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Satisfyingly Hilarious

  • By FernT on 09-27-11

Sarcastic, Irreverent Tale of Good and Evil

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-17-18

It's a sarcastic, irreverent tale of Good and Evil getting ready to battle when the world is predicted to come to an end... on a Saturday just before dinner. The most interesting characters are the angel Aziraphale and the demon Crowley, who occasionally hang out together. Crowley really isn't all that bad for a demon. And Aziraphale sometimes could be persuaded to look the other way by Crowley. It takes a while to get into the story. Groups of characters go in and out and there's no connection to the other groups. Eventually they all come together for the apocalypse and then all that back story has relevance.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Girl Logic

  • The Genius and the Absurdity
  • By: Iliza Shlesinger
  • Narrated by: Mayim Bialik, Iliza Shlesinger
  • Length: 5 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,255
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,075
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,066

From breakout stand-up comedian Iliza Shlesinger comes a subversively funny collection of essays and observations on a confident woman's approach to friendship, singlehood, and relationships. "Girl Logic" is Iliza's term for the way women obsess over details and situations that men don't necessarily even notice. She describes it as a characteristically female way of thinking that appears to be contradictory and circuitous but is actually a complicated and highly evolved way of looking at the world.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A delight

  • By Haha917 on 03-28-18

For Iliza Shlesinger's Fans

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-13-18

People are specific about what they find funny and this book is no exception, which probably appeals mainly to Iliza Shlesinger's fans and young single women. The book is a mix of topics: obstacles that women face, ranting about how women have it hard, how women think - both good and bad (Girl Logic), bit of a memoir, some inspirational stories, and meanderings into fashion, dating, partying, sex, girl friends, and trying to fit in.

  • Eligible

  • A Modern Retelling of Pride and Prejudice
  • By: Curtis Sittenfeld
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 13 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,378
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,145
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,151

This version of the Bennet family - and Mr. Darcy - is one that you have and haven't met before: Liz is a magazine writer in her late 30s who, like her yoga instructor older sister, Jane, lives in New York City. When their father has a health scare, they return to their childhood home in Cincinnati to help - and discover that the sprawling Tudor they grew up in is crumbling, and the family is in disarray.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Where are my beloved characters? Not in here

  • By Canadian eReader on 04-22-16

Not the same Elizabeth Bennet as the original

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-12-18

In this retelling of Pride and Prejudice, the characters are in modern times with a few tweaks in their personalities. A disappointment is that Elizabeth Bennet exhibited some poor judgment of character and pettiness, which made her unlikable at time. That is far different from the heroine of Pride and Prejudice.

  • The 10 Laws of Trust

  • Building the Bonds That Make a Business Great
  • By: Joel Peterson, David A. Kaplan, Stephen M. R. Covey - foreword
  • Narrated by: James Foster
  • Length: 2 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 46
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 36

Trust is the glue that holds an organization together. It turns secrecy into transparency, micromanagement into empowerment, and conflict into creativity. With it, a tiny company like John Deere grew into a worldwide leader. Without it, a giant corporation like Enron toppled.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Joel’s lessons are unbelievably valuable

  • By Peter Henry on 11-07-17

Good Guide But A Little Dull

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-18

This book does a good job of breaking down the elements of trust and different types of trusting relationships. Trust depends on all three of these conditions to be present in order to develop:
- Character: Those we trust will value our interest as their own.
- Competence: Those we trust have the requisite intelligence, ability, and training to achieve our best interest.
- Authority: Those we trust are empowered to deliver on promises.

It would have been a good guide on building trust but the writing style was a little dull.

  • A Study in Scarlet Women

  • The Lady Sherlock Series, Book 1
  • By: Sherry Thomas
  • Narrated by: Kate Reading
  • Length: 11 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,522
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,247
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,246

With her inquisitive mind, Charlotte Holmes has never felt comfortable with the demureness expected of the fairer sex in upper-class society. But even she never thought that she would become a social pariah, an outcast fending for herself on the mean streets of London. When the city is struck by a trio of unexpected deaths and suspicion falls on her sister and her father, Charlotte is desperate to find the true culprits and clear the family name.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • First-rate author and first-rate narrator

  • By Lady Wesley on 03-25-17

If Sherlock Holmes was a woman

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-05-18

It was a little confusing in the beginning when a few chapters switched to a different time. It took a while to figure out what was happening and who were the new characters. Also, it didn't make sense that Charlotte Holmes would use the name Sherlock Holmes if she wanted to keep her identity secret. Other than that, the book was enjoyable. The characters were well developed. Charlotte is intelligent and logical (as expected for a female version of Sherlock Holmes) and she is also very caring of her sisters, which gives her warmth and pleasantness that Sherlock Holmes didn't possess.

  • The Little Paris Bookshop

  • A Novel
  • By: Nina George
  • Narrated by: Steve West, Emma Bering, Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,630
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,508
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,508

Monsieur Perdu calls himself a literary apothecary. From his floating bookstore in a barge on the Seine, he prescribes novels for the hardships of life. Using his intuitive feel for the exact book a reader needs, Perdu mends broken hearts and souls. The only person he can't seem to heal through literature is himself; he's still haunted by heartbreak after his great love disappeared. She left him with only a letter, which he has never opened.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Meh

  • By Ivanka on 08-02-15

Journey to Heal Himself

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-30-18

The book dragged in the beginning as the background of the characters was revealed, including Monsieur Perdu's pining for his lost love for 21 years. After getting past that tragic and depressing situation, it started to pick up after Chapter 6. I thought the premise would be about Perdu as a literary apothecary - prescribing books to people to heal broken hearts and lost souls. Instead, it was more about Perdu's journey to heal himself and return to the world that he had withdrawn from for over 20 years.