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DowntownJohn

  • 6
  • reviews
  • 16
  • helpful votes
  • 26
  • ratings
  • The War on Normal People

  • By: Andrew Yang
  • Narrated by: Andrew Yang
  • Length: 6 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 1,101
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 981
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 981

The shift toward automation is about to create a tsunami of unemployment. Not in the distant future - now. One recent estimate predicts 13 million American workers will lose their jobs within the next seven years - jobs that won't be replaced. In a future marked by restlessness and chronic unemployment, what will happen to American society? In The War on Normal People, Andrew Yang paints a dire portrait of the American economy. Rapidly advancing technologies like artificial intelligence, robotics, and automation software are making millions of Americans' livelihoods irrelevant.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Would Vote For Him

  • By Anonymous User on 07-09-18

An important message right now

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-20-19

I can't say I enjoyed this book, because it's difficult to hear that widespread unemployment is in our future - permanently. But the author does a great job of laying out the problem and proposing a solution. And backing up that proposal with strong arguments. I also liked the author's exposing many things in our current society that either don't work for the public good, or actively work against it. An example being U. S News and World Reports annual colleges rankings. I had no idea it was so damaging. Or that Harvard functions like a hedge fund with a university attached. All in all, an excellent book. Highly Recommended.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Unfu*k Yourself

  • Get Out of Your Head and into Your Life
  • By: Gary John Bishop
  • Narrated by: Gary John Bishop
  • Length: 3 hrs and 23 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37,472
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,317
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,978

Are you tired of feeling f*cked up? If you are, Gary John Bishop has the answer. In this straightforward handbook, he gives you the tools and advice you need to demolish the slag weighing you down and become the truly unf*cked version of yourself. "Wake up to the miracle you are," he directs. "Here's what you've forgotten: You're a f*cking miracle of being." It isn't other people that are standing in your way; it isn't even your circumstances that are blocking your ability to thrive. It's yourself and the negative self-talk you keep telling yourself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • More than just a self-help book

  • By Jason Crawford on 08-06-18

A kick in the head

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-19

It appears that the author's main idea is that he can shame you into making change in your life.

In the last chapter, in his last diatribe, the author invites readers to his website so you can continue learning - and pay him a monthly subscription fee! He's using his book to peddle his website! Seriously? If the book "worked", why would you need the website?

  • Once We Were Brothers

  • By: Ronald H. Balson
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,044
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,827
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,815

Elliot Rosenzweig, a respected civic leader and philanthropist, is attending a fundraiser when he is suddenly accosted and accused of being a former Nazi SS officer named Otto Piatek, the Butcher of Zamosc. Although the charges are denounced as preposterous, his accuser is convinced he is right and engages attorney Catherine Lockhart to bring Rosenzweig to justice.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • 5-Star Thriller with History and Heart

  • By Ella on 11-22-14

Ugh

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-18

This was a romance novel that tried to disguise itself as World War II fiction. It didn't succeed.

There were too many places where the female lead droned on about her insecurities. There were too many instances where the story became an overt history lesson. There were too many conversations where someone withheld information so that we'd be left holding our seat. Just so there would be a cliffhanger. That got old.

I've read much better WWII fiction.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Rosie Project

  • A Novel
  • By: Graeme Simsion
  • Narrated by: Dan O'Grady
  • Length: 7 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,926
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,832
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,819

Don Tillman, professor of genetics, has never been on a second date. So when an acquaintance informs him that he would make a "wonderful" husband, his first reaction is shock. Yet he must concede to the statistical probability that there is someone for everyone, and Don sets out to find the perfect partner. She will be punctual and logical - most definitely not a barmaid, a smoker, a drinker, or a late-arriver. Yet Rosie Jarman is all these things. She is also beguiling, fiery, intelligent - and on a quest of her own....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not a typical romance - so much more

  • By Gretchen on 10-03-13

Wait, what?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-21-18

A cute premise that got a little old. The mystery part of the story was well done, and the budding relationship was as well, but near the end, the author rushed the relationship to the point of snapping my suspended disbelief. The ending felt like the author said "I've written enough. Let's wrap this up quickly."

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Shadow Land

  • A Novel
  • By: Elizabeth Kostova
  • Narrated by: Barrie Kreinik
  • Length: 18 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 459
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 425
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 422

A young American woman, Alexandra Boyd, has traveled to Sofia, Bulgaria, hoping that life abroad will salve the wounds left by the loss of her beloved brother. Soon after arriving in this elegant East European city, however, she helps an elderly couple into a taxi - and realizes too late that she has accidentally kept one of their bags. Inside she finds an ornately carved wooden box engraved with a name: Stoyan Lazarov. Raising the hinged lid, she discovers that she is holding an urn filled with human ashes.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Mysterious and Beautiful

  • By Mel on 04-23-17

I'd rather read Nancy Drew

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-17

This reads like a bad Young Adult fiction novel. It rambles much too much and stretches believability beyond the breaking point. Highly improbable events happen so often that I was left saying "oh, come on". Even the taxi driver character was unbelievable. It often seemed that he was placed in the novel to bluntly teach Bulgarian history. Indeed, the author admits in the afterward that the novel was a vehicle to teach Bulgarian history. It may have done that, but it wasn't an entertaining ride.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Handmaid's Tale: Special Edition

  • By: Margaret Atwood, Valerie Martin - essay
  • Narrated by: Claire Danes, full cast, Margaret Atwood
  • Length: 12 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 26,416
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,302
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,235

After a violent coup in the United States overthrows the Constitution and ushers in a new government regime, the Republic of Gilead imposes subservient roles on all women. Offred, now a Handmaid tasked with the singular role of procreation in the childless household of the enigmatic Commander and his bitter wife, can remember a time when she lived with her husband and daughter and had a job, before she lost everything, even her own name.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • WAIT WAIT WAIT WAIT WAIT

  • By ambER on 04-20-17

It didn't have an ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-17

This book described a dystopian future but it didn't have a conflict / resolution. There was no ending. It just ended. I felt like the story was just getting started when it ended. It was extremely well performed and it kept my interest, but I was unsatisfied at the end.

  • Between These Sheets

  • By: Devon McCormack
  • Narrated by: Michael Pauley
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 243
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 229
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 228

Jay is always on the run - always looking for the next place to start a new life. But no matter how much he moves, he can't escape the painful memories that haunt him. As he settles into his latest job in the warehouse at a glass bottle factory, he finds himself the target of his co-workers' teasing. When he takes a stand against one of the bullies, a fight breaks out. His boss, a war vet named Reese, steps in, and Jay accidentally shoves him to the ground, revealing Reese's prosthetic leg.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • wow!!!!! it's the best gay love book I read so far

  • By Rebecca Azizov on 04-10-17

Repetitive and boring

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-17

What disappointed you about Between These Sheets?

This story can be summarized in a few lines:
"I'm not OK."
"I'm not OK, either."

Throw in some sex.
Rinse. Lather. Repeat. Ad nauseam.

It isn't so much a story (because nothing much happens) as much as it is a character study where two troubled, but (somehow) well built characters (because they never visit a gym) keep talking about their issues to each other and the reader. Alternating the narration between characters for each chapter doesn't help, as it comes across as an excuse to replay each scene (instead of advancing the story with a new one).

Instead of having his characters go through experiences and talk to each other about the experience, or even better, have us learn about the characters by how they react to the experience, Devon McCormack's characters just keep talking about their issues and how they don't go away. It's repetitive and boring.

Has Between These Sheets turned you off from other books in this genre?

Unfortunately, the first book I read in this genre was, and still is, the best I've read (in this genre). This book has turned me off from believing the star rating system (although it's not the only book to do so). I have to wonder, how could this book have such a high rating?

How could the performance have been better?

The narrator's voice alternated between giddy and frantic.

What character would you cut from Between These Sheets?

I'd cut Reese's ex. That would remove one big, unsatisfying story line. Unfortunately, that would leave the story that much weaker.

Any additional comments?

Don't waste your time.