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Mimi Routh

California
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  • Neverwhere

  • By: Neil Gaiman
  • Narrated by: Neil Gaiman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 29,726
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,797
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,784

Richard Mayhew is a young man with a good heart and an ordinary life, which is changed forever when he stops to help a girl he finds bleeding on a London sidewalk. His small act of kindness propels him into a world he never dreamed existed. There are people who fall through the cracks, and Richard has become one of them. And he must learn to survive in this city of shadows and darkness, monsters and saints, murderers and angels, if he is ever to return to the London that he knew.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Vivid, imaginative.

  • By Joseph on 10-29-09

No Thank You!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-12-19

Why did 24,000 people put up with this? The only way I would continue trying to listen would be if the story were true. Since this fabricated nightmare is only made up, I will bail. And avoid this author like the plague.

  • Folsom Untold: The Strange True Story of Johnny Cash's Greatest Album

  • An Audible Original Drama
  • By: Danny Robins
  • Narrated by: Danny Robins
  • Length: 2 hrs and 21 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 10,223
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 9,306
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 9,288

This is the story of one of the greatest records ever made - Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison - and its shocking and tragic aftermath. Join award-winning journalist Danny Robins on the 50th anniversary of the album as he takes you on a road trip back to 1968, a pivotal year in US history, to investigate the dramatic and unlikely friendship between Johnny Cash, American icon, and Glen Sherley, armed robber and Folsom inmate, and how that friendship was violently torn apart. 

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Horrible narrator, lackluster writing

  • By A on 02-11-19

Sad Comments About Country Music

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-26-19

Wow, what a waste of time! I suspect this would have gone over much better with other Brits instead of Americans. Really, there is nothing glamorous or romantic about poverty, ignorance, dysfunction, drug addiction, crime and incarceration. These people could just as well have found a pow-wow and exclaimed over the “real Indians” wearing feathers and dancing.
The texture of this thing is choppy, inconsistent. And yet near the end I drifted off, only to wake at mention of my hometown of Bakersfield, California. I waited to hear about my town being yet another country music center with its own special sound and claiming Buck Owens, Merle Haggard and Dwight Yoakam. But not a word! Nothing about the Dust Bowl or Steinbeck‘s 1939 masterpiece novel “Grapes of Wrath” depicting the suffering. I went to grade school with Dust Bowl kids. I knew they were poor. Decades later, cream has risen to the top, and the “Okies” have made a fine town. But our journalist rushed off to EL-AY to catch his plane. Fooey! I am so glad this downer was free! Danny, you’ve only scratched the surface!

  • Every Day Is Extra

  • By: John Kerry
  • Narrated by: John Kerry
  • Length: 28 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 221

Every Day Is Extra is Kerry’s passionate, insightful, sometimes funny, always moving account of his life. Kerry tells wonderful stories about colleagues Ted Kennedy and John McCain, as well as President Obama and other major figures. He writes movingly of recovering his faith while in the Senate, and deplores the hyper-partisanship that has infected Washington. Few books convey as convincingly as this one the life of public service like that which John Kerry has lived for 50 years.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well-written, and a completely engaged performance

  • By S.R. on 09-05-18

Thoroughly World Class

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-10-19

A perfect life perfectly described and a perfect reading of his own book. At first I thought Part 2 would end it, but even if the book seems long, I would not have missed all the descriptions of the diplomacy. Trying to follow the news, I had thought that the other side was just being stubborn. But no, they were trying, and by next morning they had spoken to someone or thought more about it, so over breakfast the picture would have shifted and all the work have to be thrown out. . . . My Vietnam vet husband used to joke, 'I'm so poor I can't even pay attention!" Alas, the people who should listen to this book are way too stupid to pay attention. I think Mr. Kerry wrote this book for the future, for whoever is able to pay attention. He should have been our President; the election was stolen by a doofus. Now we have another doofus. . . We need to pay attention and demand the best We need to study, over-prepare and keep a positive attitude. I served as an admin officer in the USAF (and was mostly bored to tears). As a Spanish general wrote to my commanding officer, I wish for John Kerry: May God protect you many years!

  • The Body Keeps the Score

  • Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma
  • By: Bessel Van der Kolk MD
  • Narrated by: Sean Pratt
  • Length: 16 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 6,113
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 5,362
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 5,283

In The Body Keeps the Score, Bessel van der Kolk transforms our understanding of traumatic stress, revealing how it literally rearranges the brain’s wiring - specifically areas dedicated to pleasure, engagement, control, and trust. He shows how these areas can be reactivated through innovative treatments including neuro feedback, mindfulness techniques, play, yoga, and other therapies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unbelievably clear and Life Changing

  • By colleen geis on 05-06-15

Interesting Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-19

Wonderful narrator! My counselor knows the author personally, has read the book, heard the author speak. Most of the book is a history. THIS IS NOT A SELF-HELP BOOK! And ideas for self help come near the end. For me, breathing exercises, yoga. If my old husband were still alive, he could use the information. A Vietnam vet, he saw his best friend blown up. For a younger population and people working with traumatized people, oh, yes, wonderful new developments and resources.

  • Goodbye, Things

  • The New Japanese Minimalism
  • By: Fumio Sasaki, Eriko Sugita - translator
  • Narrated by: Keith Szarabajka
  • Length: 4 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,011
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,610
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,580

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo - he's just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn't absolutely need. The effects were remarkable: Sasaki gained true freedom, new focus, and a real sense of gratitude for everything around him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Practical , Deep and Self-Reflection

  • By Anonymous User on 05-11-17

Marie Kondo Better for Me

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-19

Well, this author is half my age and living in another culture. My country is largely Christian; therefore I naturally cultivate gratitude. At one time long ago in a city, I worked serving cocktails to many Japanese businessmen who would get pickled on Chivas Regal. Americans saw and heard many things in those days which caused us to conclude that the Japanese had more money than sense. Nowadays I volunteer my time and budget in order to contribute to good causes. My money is now so tight that I wish for things I need for a very long time. At last, I buy. When the beautiful warm parka was on sale 50% off, I jumped for it! My desire is to be appropriately dressed -- not to show off! I happen to be an artistic type, so I love color. I live beside Lake Tahoe. If I had another home in New York City, be sure that closets in both houses would have snow boots, pants, turtlenecks and jackets! When Jacquie Kennedy Onassis found a T-shirt she liked, she would buy a whole stack in all the colors! . . . Some of this author's quick solutions just don't work in my country. Auctions? [If he means eBay, that is hard work for limited return.] Quick pick-up? Sitting in a cafe all night? Not bloody likely. And not everything can be replaced. I have books in foreign languages, books that are out of print. French and Italian fiber craft magazines. As I get older and older, relinquishment becomes easy in some respects. I see hobby instructions I could have written 50 years ago. In that case, I sure don't buy more, and I donate to my public library for their fund-raising. In the U.S. we have Goodwill and many other thrift shops. My town also has a couple privately operated thrift stores. The owners of these are a bit more respectful toward bone china, fragile vintage clothes, great old finery. So I may donate to them with a good feeling. . . . No, when I need to make space in my home, Marie Kondo's guidelines have been most helpful for me. . . . I think I heard one translation error in telling about meditation. The meditator tries not to think about anything at all, not concentrate on some word or thought! . . . This narrator put me to sleep, and his rendering of quotations originally pronounced by speakers of foreign languages -- that was just irritating. I doubt Einstein had such a terrible accent in English.

  • Orphan Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Christina Baker Kline
  • Narrated by: Jessica Almasy, Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,794
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,665
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,675

Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to "aging out" out of the foster care system. A community-service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse.... As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Moving story of sharing and transformation.

  • By Kathi on 04-03-13

Chirpy Sappy Stereotypical Predictable . . . Bad!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-18

For starters, not all Irishmen are alcoholics, and not all Irish families have too many kids! I thought this thing was for kids and thought I would not let my kids get anywhere near it. Then to find out this is adult contemporary fiction, oh, please! And eighteen thousand people thought it was pretty good? Where are their heads? Have they read Kingsolver, Doerr, Gabaldon, Dumas, Austen, Steinbeck, Wharton, Zafon, the Brontes, Bryce Courtenay or Thomas Mann?

I'm out of here.

  • The House of Broken Angels

  • By: Luis Alberto Urrea
  • Narrated by: Luis Alberto Urrea
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 917
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 850
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 845

In his final days, beloved and ailing patriarch Miguel Angel de La Cruz, affectionately called Big Angel, has summoned his entire clan for one last legendary birthday party. But as the party approaches, his mother, nearly 100, dies herself, leading to a farewell doubleheader in a single weekend. Among the guests is Big Angel's half-brother, known as Little Angel, who must reckon with the truth that although he shares a father with his siblings, he has not, as a half gringo, shared a life. Across two bittersweet days in their San Diego neighborhood, the revelers mingle.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Not death, and Not borders

  • By Clodhopper on 05-01-18

We Are All Broken Angels at a Great Fiesta!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-23-18

This is Great Literature and the perfect narrator. The book went slow for me at first, with people hanging out, going places in hot cars, lots of different names and relationships. I stayed with it and was well rewarded. The house in the story belongs to Big Angel and his wife, Perla. It is Big Angel's 70th and last birthday, as he is slowly dying of a terminal disease. Mr. Urrea obviously writes from his own life, as he has an American mom, and his dad was murdered. Mixed heritage and shocking losses occur in the book with speculation on who really knows Spanish, who really understands all the English around them. And then there's Spanglish -- great fun!

The story covers only a few days but clearly goes back and forth to tell how all the lives have progressed. The book is full of delicious insights into the characters. How does a man find out that some of us ladies don't wash our faces in the shower! The scene with the war veteran in the car with his son driving -- having combat flashbacks while on drugs -- oh, dear! I was paralyzed, just listening to get through it. Were those complete sentences? What just happened? An impressionist word painting? This classic will take me several more listens. Note that it is not necessarily about beautiful people living in gorgeous houses, making wild crazy money and wild crazy love. It is more about real life human beings interacting, cooking, cleaning, caring for the old man, remembering other times.

I could not tell if the English content of the book filled in for the Spanish because I understood nearly all the Spanish. Don't complain that you deserve a translation. Get the print book and look up words. Or start trying to learn our second language. I came through schools in Bakersfield with Mexican kids, and the USAF sent me to Spain. Now my church has a pastor from Mexico and a Mass in Spanish. Padre Mauricio's English is better than mine! I would not miss an Easter Vigil lasting several hours when he baptizes, confirms and marries a number of people, switching languages as necessary, a stack of towels up front, people going back and forth, little kids falling asleep. This book gives me more insight into these beautiful people described as insular and why they should not try to conform to my UK-gringo-Puritan-Cherokee-Texas-Kansas take on the world. This book is a treasure.

  • The Journey Beyond Enlightenment

  • The Next Step in Your Personal Transformation
  • By: Stuart Wilde
  • Narrated by: Stuart Wilde
  • Length: 5 hrs and 43 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70

Journey into an incredible spiritual terrain unknown to all but the most adventurous seekers. In The Journey Beyond Enlightenment, internationally-acclaimed author and "spiritual warrior" Stuart Wilde will show you how to access and enter what he calls the Mirror World - a hyperdimensional reality that exists beyond the constraints of time, space, and intellect.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very engaging

  • By Danita Banko on 11-13-16

COMFORTING AND LIFE-CHANGING

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-18

This is for me the deepest of Stuart's books. It is a nice listen at first. Then when I was in personal crisis, repeated listens absolutely saved my soul. I don't believe this book is in print.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Silent Power

  • By: Stuart Wilde
  • Narrated by: Stuart Wilde
  • Length: 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 122
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81

Stuart Wilde gives you a lot to ponder on this unabridged audiobook. His underlying philosophy is that there is a silent power within you, an inner knowing that grows because you understand its infinity. It teaches you hour by hour and day by day. It is silent...but it is also so powerful. Reach inside and find it!

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Unfortunate Suprise

  • By Bradler on 01-24-10

Pretty Good BUT NOT THE BOOK SILENT POWER!!!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-18

Stuie left us a lot to work with and think about. I have two copies of the wonderful print book of this title. This recording was made after 2001 when he and his friends saw the morph! This should never have been sold as a reading of the book! If you just love Stuart Wilde (as I definitely do), then spring for this little recording, but also read the book because they are different! If you have only one credit, I'd recommend the Journey Beyond Enlightenment. Well, everything he does is bloody marvelous. I had an epiphany with Journey recently, after many listens! He has a well maintained website and more recordings available at Quiet Earth. Some of them are a bit light-hearted, off the cuff. So first get everything here at audible if you're a real disciple. . . . Power is being misused around the world at all levels. Sensitive people who have good hearts are getting hurt. All the look at me ego on social media is not the way. Stuart shows how an upside down quiet way is the correct way to win in life and reach the side door: at the back of the line in old clothes and a bad haircut, helping an old man carry his stuff . . .

  • Elmet

  • By: Fiona Mozley
  • Narrated by: Gareth Bennett Ryan
  • Length: 7 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 450
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 423
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 423

In this atmospheric and profoundly moving debut, Cathy and Daniel live with their father, John, in the remote woods of Yorkshire, in a house the three of them built themselves. John is a gentle brute of a man, a former enforcer who fights for money when he has to, but who otherwise just wants to be left alone to raise his children. When a local landowner shows up on their doorstep, their precarious existence is threatened, and a series of actions is set in motion that can only end in violence.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Strains credibility

  • By DM on 01-06-18

Young Author First Novel Masterpiece

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-20-18

This young author has tremendous talent. A second listen helps because chunks of text that properly belong at the end are inserted throughout the book, a nice artistic touch which gives insight into the character of Daniel. I listened three times, discovering more each time. Somehow, despite the seaminess, corruption and violence, I found love and value, intelligence, a great world of hope for growing kids. We have outlier communities in the U.S., possibly in the mountains of northern California, for example. In the last century we have had people who wanted to do everything from scratch, do it their way, and home school. Most of us are under the thumb of some brute. The book helped me through a month of abusive senior subsidized housing inspection involving what amounted to 7 days total of almost house arrest waiting for inspectors, making nice to the corporate hierarchy.
The narrator was quite perfect. For the women’s voices, he WAS a woman! My people are mostly from the British Isles, and I’ve had a lifetime of the good UK books, audio books, Masterpiece Theatre TV, etc. He certainly got the right nasty intonation for the Price boys. Skillful and subtle, a pleasure to listen to, he WAS Daniel.
The violence in the book is not gratuitous and is no worse than that in Steig Larsson’s Girl Who books. I loved the respect for wildlife, trees and plants. I loved all the description. I probably missed hints at the adult relationships before the kids were born. The ending was okay by me. I figure they’ll meet up on the other side, and the bad guys always pay in the end, even if we don’t get to see it. You have to love a brother who cuts colored paper for holiday decorations and bakes holiday cakes. You have to admire a woman who can roll her own cigarettes and strangle her would-be rapist. In this country we look at the cars and clothes and – increasingly – teeth and haircuts. We don’t expect our trailer trash to read books and know things. God, I love this book! Be happy and keep writing, dear Fiona!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful