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A Rare & Poignant Glimpse

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-24-19

“Tony Soprano” was so many different things to so many different people. To some of us, Tony’s appeal was defined not by the primary themes of The Sopranos, but by David Chase’s arc for the character of Tony. Jim Gandolfini was the critical variable. Dan Bischoff brings Jim, not Tony, to life... and back to life... for those of us who miss Jim’s depth, while we reflect on our fortune for the opportunity to have shared in his life, if only as patrons of his art, for what short time we did.

I was torn on the quality of the remaster, but...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-15-19

I was initially torn on the quality of the remaster because of the predominant audio level, but the justification is reasonable (and becomes implicit) considering one of the many vices of our favorite biscuit-master and swiller of whiskey. McMurtry, in no uncertain context, establishes Gus as a man whose voice carries, booms in fact, beyond those of mortal men. It's only natural that Horsley incorporated that characterization into the performance. Any of us throwing shade on Horsley's "Gus" would be better served to blame McMurtry. But what fool wants to do either of those things when we could instead be listening to an epic tale about, in part, an iron-headed ranger who'll cheat at card-cuttting for a poke and argue with a stump. Yep; the "Horsley's 'Gus' was terrible" argument is one argument the stumps just aren't going to win.