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Stephanie

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  • A Clockwork Murder

  • The Night a Twisted Fantasy Became a Demented Reality
  • By: Steve Jackson
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 242
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 217
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 219

In April 1997, pretty, 22-year-old Jacine Gielinski stopped her car at a red light in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She had no idea that the two young men looking at her from the car next to hers would in that moment decide she would be their target for unspeakable horrors.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • well written, excellent narration

  • By Roberta on 07-08-17

Captivating Heartbreaking Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-26-17

Where does A Clockwork Murder rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

It is one of the better ones as far as being able to keep my attention and wanting to get back to listening to it when I have had to stop for whatever reason. That's the sign of a good book.

What other book might you compare A Clockwork Murder to and why?

I would compare this book to some of Ann Rule's stand alone novels in that it shows the workings of the killer's thoughts and motivations, as well as a picture of who the victim is before the crime and follows through the whole court proceedings. It includes the interactions of the families of both the victim and the killers with the press and various lawyers and prosecutors. Both this author and Ann Rule are very thorough in their exploration of the case and criminal justice system, and both treat the victim's families with tremendous respect.

Which scene was your favorite?

I don't want to say which part of the book was my favorite because I don't want to give anything away. But there were several parts that hit you in the gut. I particularly felt for the victim's parents. Their grief was tangible. I also felt frustration and anger at the defense lawyers and even the Supreme Court. That's all I will say.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

Colorado was weird back in the day. Appointing a 3 judge panel to decide the death penalty? I'd never heard of that. I much prefer the way it is now. It should have always been left up to the jury.

Any additional comments?

It's not necessary for the listener to have seen A Clockwork Orange to get this book, but it is a help. However, I wouldn't suggest running out an viewing it just to listen to this book. The author provides plenty of references so that you understand the connection.

I was provided a copy of this book at no charge by the author in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

11 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • Serial Killers Rage and Horror

  • 8 Shocking True Crime Stories of Serial Killers and Killing Sprees
  • By: Jack Rosewood, Rebecca Lo
  • Narrated by: David L. White
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 43
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 44

From rampage killers to hunters that seek out human prey in the shadows of the night, this serial killer anthology is a collection of horror stories. Collectively these men were responsible for hundreds of deaths, and they all belong in the realm of the worst serial killers to date. Delve into eight different cases and explore the heinous deeds committed, the background of each killer, and the apparent motives for their crimes.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • True Crime some really shilling reading

  • By Cyn on 07-11-17

As Always, Jack Rosewood Delivers

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-02-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Absolutely.

Who was your favorite character and why?

They weren't really characters, as this is a nonfiction book, but I was glad to finally hear about the Luby's Cafeteria massacre in detail since it is referenced in many other true crime books - especially anthologies (including some of the author's other works).

Have you listened to any of David L. White’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I have heard other performances by David L. White, and everything I have ever heard from him has been strong and solid. This book is no exception. There are one or two words that he mispronounces, and normally that sort of thing sends me off the rails, but his inflection is so good throughout the rest of the narration, that I can almost overlook a word, possibly two. I have certainly heard far worse, and overall, he lands a pleasant and smooth performance.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

I honestly have no idea, but I think I would re-do the subtitle to take out "spree" and put some other word in there. Mass murder maybe, or massacre. Maybe you could argue the Hillside Stranglers were spree murderers, but it would be hard. There really weren't enough stories about spree killers to justify that word in such a prominent place on the cover, I felt.

However, it's a bit nit-picky of me, and it's a good book and I would recommend it for any fan of true crime. It was an easy listen.

Any additional comments?

I was given a copy of this book by the author, publisher or narrator at no cost in exchange for a fair and honest review.

  • Murder Most Foul

  • True Crime Stories of Murder and Mayhem
  • By: Gary C King
  • Narrated by: Dan Orders
  • Length: 11 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 26

Bizarre, compelling, terrifying, and authentic true crime stories of murder and mayhem. In this audiobook you will find 18 stories about love affairs gone deadly, mass murder, a family slaughter, even a story about a killer who impersonated his victim - chilling crimes that could only be perpetrated by the twisted minds and gruesome obsessions of coldblooded killers, the stuff that horror movies and novels are made of.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • mix of crime stories

  • By Christine Newton on 05-05-17

Solid Storytelling and Decent Narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-17

Would you try another book from Gary C King and/or Dan Orders?

Yes, I would.

Would you be willing to try another book from Gary C King? Why or why not?

Yes, I would, although at times it felt he was stretching to find synonyms for certain words that weren't necessary. The best example is when he would call the investigators "probers," instead of just calling them detectives or investigators. It was like he was afraid of reusing the same word too often. But honestly, I would have preferred that.

Did Dan Orders do a good job differentiating all the characters? How?

I don't remember him differentiating any of the characters per se... the way the book is set up, it's a recitation of facts in retrospect; you really only get to hear from witnesses and victims from reports and hearsay, so most of the time anything that is a "character" line is in quotations (for lack of a better explanation). I suppose he could have chosen to characterize those quotations, and some he did a little bit, but for the most part he chose not to, and it did not hurt the narration at all.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

It wouldn't make a very good movie. However, it would make a very good series of true crime episodes on tv, and I would definitely watch those.

Any additional comments?

I enjoyed this book and I would recommend it to any true crime enthusiast. I feel like these guiding questions didn't really help me leave a great review of this book for once. It wasn't the best true crime book I've ever heard, but I did enjoy both the writing and the narration. The story I enjoyed the most was the one about the killer who was going after law enforcement officers. And by enjoy, I don't mean it made me happy, I mean it was the most emotional for me. If you like true crime, give this book a listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • True Crime Stories, Volume 5

  • 12 Shocking True Crime Murder Cases
  • By: Jack Rosewood
  • Narrated by: David L. White
  • Length: 3 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32

Listen to this true crime anthology and learn about 12 of the most shocking true crime cases in modern history. You will be glued to your device as you hear about high profile true crime murder cases, such as the murder of Laci Peterson, and the murder trial of actor Robert Blake, while learning about some lesser-known yet equally notorious murder trials. You will follow criminal investigations into cold murder cases that were once thought to be unsolvable.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • There's a Sweet Spot With Anthologies

  • By in1ear (John Row) on 03-24-17

Best Anthology of True Crime I've Heard Yet!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-31-17

What made the experience of listening to True Crime Stories, Volume 5 the most enjoyable?

There wasn't one thing. Everything together made the experience great. The writing was smooth and flowed nicely, without dragging or seeming to stutter in places. It also made sense and was understandable yet intelligent. The narration was great. David L. White has a very pleasant voice to listen to. Also, the use of music cues underscoring the stories made the whole thing pop and really kept my attention and served its purpose perfectly.

Who was your favorite character and why?

There were no "characters." But I was glad to hear more about the Laci Peterson murder as I have always been fascinated by that case and it was highlighted in this book.

Have you listened to any of David L. White’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Alas, I have not. But I certainly will be listening to more in the future, as he is a fantastic narrator! He is one of the best I have heard. I would say he is one of the top 2 male narrators as far as talent, inflection, pronunciation, tone, timing, etc... I highly recommend listening to him.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

There were several. But I'm not going to give away any spoilers. That's just wrong.

Any additional comments?

I definitely recommend this book for any fans of true crime. I only wish it was longer. Under 4 hours is a crying shame.

I was given a copy of this book by the author at no charge in exchange for a fair, honest, and unbiased review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Crime Scene

  • True Stories of Crime and Detection
  • By: Gary C. King
  • Narrated by: Dan Orders
  • Length: 10 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 36
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 35
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 35

In this audiobook you will find a story about a tormented serial killer and how he resorted to cannibalism, a female celebrity's fan who had an obsession to murder her, torture murders, crimes of passion, among many others - chilling crimes that could only be perpetrated by the twisted minds and gruesome obsessions of coldblooded killers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • True Crime That Will Have You Holding Your Breath.

  • By Kelly watley on 02-27-17

Good Mix of Stories

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-17

Would you listen to Crime Scene again? Why?

I might, in several years, when I have forgotten the details of most of the cases. Since it's a book of many cases, most of which I was not familiar with (at least in detail), I can see myself listening to it again once it's been long enough to forget the names and specifics of the crimes. Of course there are a couple of huge cases, like Dahmer, that everyone knows about, that most people know at least some details about...but even there, there are always a few details I forget after a while. So eventually, yes, I can see myself listening to this book again.

What did you like best about this story?

I like listening to the different stories and trying to see if I remember hearing about them in the press or the media at any point. If they happened before I was born, I like to see if I remember seeing a true-crime program done on the case. In other words, I enjoy trying to figure out if the details of of any given case are familiar to me. Unfortunately, that's what I like about all of these type of crime anthologies, so it's not specific to this book, but it *is* what I liked best about it.
What I like best about this specific book was the detail given in the cases. Some try to hedge around unpleasant details, but in this book, they were stated as fact. Which they are.

What about Dan Orders’s performance did you like?

In this book, Dan Orders, performance was fine. It was flowing and matched the writing and didn't lag at all. I didn't find myself distracted or find my mind wandering. It sounded natural and the pace was normal. I also feel that the writing in this book was better than in the other book I have reviewed by the same author and narrator, so that was a help to the narrator as well, and allowed him to return a better performance. This book just seemed to flow a little better for some reason, although I haven't been able to pinpoint it.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Actually no. It's a perfect book for commuting. Especially given the fact that it's broken down into individual cases. I listened to it on my dives to and from work and other places when I was alone in the car, and I very much enjoyed it that way. It's a solid book, and if you enjoy true crime stories, then there certainly cases in this book that you should experience.

Any additional comments?

I was given this audio book at no cost by the author or narrator in exchange for a fair and honest review.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Out for Blood

  • Britain's Thorney Dyke Knife Murders
  • By: Gary C. King
  • Narrated by: Dan Orders
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18

This is the disturbing account of 31-year-old Joanna Dennehy, mother of two; the man under her spell, Gary Stretch, 47; and the murder investigation that led them and others to the Old Bailey for trial. A true crime short, plus 17 additional true crime stories.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Tasty Morsels of Murder . . .

  • By Polly Poizendem on 03-10-17

Struggled through this one

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-17

Would you try another book from Gary C. King and/or Dan Orders?

Yes, I would.

Would you recommend Out for Blood to your friends? Why or why not?

You know, I would tell them that I personally had a very difficult time listening to the book, but to be fair, I know that it's because of the narration, so they may actually be quite fine with the book...since narration quality is a subjective experience. I would also tell them that there's nothing wrong with the writing, but it's also not stellar. At times it seems to drag a bit, and also rely on the same wordage repeatedly. But it wasn't horrible either.

What didn’t you like about Dan Orders’s performance?

I can't pinpoint precisely, as I have listened to other performances by Dan Orders and have not had the same experience. The other narration I have heard from him was much better. This leads me to feel that it must be the writing, and yet, again, I tried another book by the same author (it was the same author/narrator combo), and it felt like a different book. This book seemed to drag for me, it just seemed like a chore to have to get through at times. Kind of sluggish at points. But it wasn't horrendous, and the stories were sometimes quite interesting.

If this book were a movie would you go see it?

It would depend on who makes it and the budget.

Any additional comments?

I honestly don't know whether or not to recommend this particular book. Is this early in the writer and narrators' careers? It feels to be. Because at least the one other book I have experienced by the both of them is not weighed down like this one, and is a much easier listen.

I was provided a copy of the audio book free of charge by the author and/or narrator in exchange for an honest review.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Cold Kill

  • The True Story of a Murderous Love
  • By: Jack Olsen
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 12 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 525
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 477
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 481

David loved Cindy and was loved in return. Or so he thought. The troubled young man clung to his new love and dreamed of their future together. So begins the chain of events that was to evolve into a horror of terrifying proportions. Jack Olsen, best-selling author of Son, now reveals the details of a true-life romance gone hideously awry.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If Cindy Calls - DON'T Answer!

  • By Polly Poizendem on 02-12-17

A Story So Messed Up, You Won't Believe It's True

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-22-17

What made the experience of listening to Cold Kill the most enjoyable?

Knowing that it was a true story. Because I had to keep reminding myself it was a true story. Usually I don't have to do that if it says "true story" somewhere on the cover of the book!

What did you like best about this story?

This is going to make me sound like an absolutely horrible human being, but I swear I'm not. I'm not sure if you could say it's what I liked "best" about the story...but I was continually astounded that someone (David) could fall for such obvious lies from someone else (Cindy) time after time. And I was shocked that Cindy could come out with these outrageous statements that to me, might be on par with claiming that JFK is still alive and living in her basement, and that she would have other people believing her. And not only believing her, but willing to do things for her. I guess I liked the shock factor of the book. It described the way some people can live and how that is totally acceptable to some other people. For example, the descriptions of how Cindy kept her living spaces was repugnant, but she was still able to get men to come over, despite the visual mess and smell, which was described as pretty darn nasty. I just don't understand how that even works. And that's completely separate from her issues with being a pathological liar.
The other thing that is interesting about the book is that the people in her life know that she lies, but they don't know how much. And neither do we. She is one messed up lady, so there's clearly some trauma somewhere, but you have no clue what to believe and what not to believe. Except for the Mafia part. That's pretty clearly a lie. So yes it's confusing, but more in an intriguing way, not so much a frustrating way.

Have you listened to any of Kevin Pierce’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

This measures up to his other performances. Kevin is a solid narrator who is easy to listen to. His pronunciation is always good and his intonation and inflection is appropriate as well. He has a pleasant voice for narration, and I gladly and readily download any book narrated by Kevin. I very much enjoy his narration.

If you could give Cold Kill a new subtitle, what would it be?

The Unbelievable Story of a Pathological Liar and Her Pathetically Desperate Boyfriend.

Any additional comments?

This was an interesting book. You should check it out. You will be shaking your head in disbelief.

I was given this audiobook for free by the author, narrator or publisher in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Without Mercy

  • Obsession and Murder Under the Influence
  • By: Gary Provost
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pierce
  • Length: 8 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 497
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 454
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 452

On any Sunday morning in the Florida Redlands, Dee Casteel might have served you pancakes at the IHOP. She was a hard-working, cheerful waitress, one of the nicest people you'd ever want to know. She was also a three-bottle-a-day alcoholic, hopelessly in love with the IHOP's manager, Allen Bryant. Bryant wanted his live-in lover, IHOP owner Art Venecia, dead. And Dee Casteel helped him to arrange it.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I Thoroughly Enjoyed This Book

  • By Stephanie on 02-08-17

I Thoroughly Enjoyed This Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-08-17

Would you listen to Without Mercy again? Why?

I absolutely would. The writing was excellent. It flowed seamlessly, and felt as if it was someone just speaking. Many times with books, I find that the writing is distinctly separated from the story. It's very hard to explain, but Gary Provost has a style of writing that feels totally natural and allows you to place yourself *into* the story; as if you are standing right beside the characters, and not observing from the outside. It sucks you into the world of the story, and that is always an indicator of an excellent book.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

Besides the writing, which draws you in without you even noticing, what I found most compelling was the story of a woman who found herself a key player in 2 murders. At the end of the book, I was conflicted in my feelings towards her. It's much easier to judge someone when you don't know what they've been through and what led them to make the choices they made. At the same time, she clearly made decisions that resulted in the deaths of 2 people and deserved to be punished. So at the end of the book, you ask yourself "was justice served?" I personally think it was, but part of me still felt sorry for her, and then I felt bad for feeling sorry for her. I like books that leave me conflicted. That means they have made me feel something.

What about Kevin Pierce’s performance did you like?

Kevin Pierce, as always, nailed the performance. I very much enjoy his narrations. He has a pleasant voice to listen to and uses pauses and inflection to enhance his performance. He also (Thank God) takes the time to learn how to pronounce names of people and places correctly, which I didn't know could be an issue until I heard another narrator slaughter all sorts of names in a very well-know and public true-crime case book. So now I have a whole new level of appreciation for narrators who pronounce words correctly. I don't hesitate to download any book narrated by Kevin Pierce.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

It didn't make me laugh or cry, but it did leave me with mixed emotions, and that's rare for me with a true-crime book. I am not sure if that was the author's intention, but it was because of his thorough portrayal of Dee. He was able to write her in such a way that made her so identifiable. She wasn't a cold-blooded monster, and that made what she did hard to come to terms with. I was quite impressed with the impact this book had on my emotions. I didn't expect to get as involved as I did.

Any additional comments?

I received this book free of charge from the narrator in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Luke Karamazov

  • Great Lakes Books Series
  • By: Conrad Hilberry
  • Narrated by: John N. Gully
  • Length: 5 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 12
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 12

Was it because they were subconsciously trying to kill the drunken, violent man that was their father that brothers Luke Karamazov and Tommy Searl from Kalamazoo became serial murderers? Addressing this and other questions, author Conrad Hilberry presents an unusually vivid and detailed portrait of two contrasting psychological types in this account. In 1964, Luke confessed to a five-week murder spree in which he killed five men. Tommy was convicted of the rape and murder of four women in 1972.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sunglasses In Prison...!

  • By Polly Poizendem on 01-15-17

Not What I Was Expecting, But Very Good

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-24-17

What made the experience of listening to Luke Karamazov the most enjoyable?

Honestly? Being surprised by how much it actually drew me in and how much I enjoyed it. It is not your usual "true crime" book. This book is more concerned with why the killer did the things he did, and why he turned out the way he did, than with his actual crimes and the solving of those crimes. You don't really get to know the victims. This book takes you into the head of the killer, and to some extent, the head of his little brother, who is also a serial killer. It asks questions like "what makes 2 brothers, 2 sons, grow up to become serial killers? Why is one given to torture, while the other isn't? Is it nature or nurture?"
The book is mostly in the form of an interview, and the interviewer's reflections on those interviews. And at first, I thought it was going to be a dreadful bore, and I would have to fight to get through it. I like true crime books with an element of who-done-it... Where you get to know the victims, and there's a trial. But this book ended up being quite fascinating, and very dark in its own way. I found myself pondering the very same questions that were being asked by the author. I underestimated this book, and I'm happy I did.

Who was your favorite character and why?

It's not possible to have a "favorite" character in a book like this. Luke and his brother were both fascinating to think about. Luke particularly because he is such a paradox.

Have you listened to any of John N. Gully’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

I had not. But I found him to be an exceptional narrator, and I would listen to anything that he narrates again without hesitation. He did a wonderful job, and he read with such ease and normalcy. He has a great voice for narration.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

That your surroundings can very much form you are at any given time. Which I don't think anyone wants to believe. I think people want to think that they are who they are, and they would be that way no matter where they were. But, here you have a man, who, if he were out on the streets, would be killing and killing and killing. Put him in a prison, and he becomes someone who is respected and relied upon, not just by other inmates, but by the staff as well. Not only that, but he is known throughout the state penal system for his influence. So what does that say about you and me?

This is a truly thought-provoking book and I highly recommend it.

Any additional comments?

I was given this book for free by the narrator in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.

  • True Crime Stories Volume 4

  • 12 Shocking True Crime Murder Cases
  • By: Jack Rosewood
  • Narrated by: Thomas Stone
  • Length: 2 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 51
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 45
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 45

Warning! The following true crime book may shock and frighten the faint hearted. In this book are assembled 12 of the strangest true crime stories in human history. There is no doubt that some of these cases will disturb you, but it is equally assured that you will not be able to stop listening!

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • another great story by Jack rosewood

  • By Cheryl a DeMont on 12-12-16

Interesting Stories; Narration Needed Help

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-11-17

What did you love best about True Crime Stories Volume 4?

I liked hearing about different crime stories that I wasn't aware of. Particularly from times and places that are far removed from my own.

Who was your favorite character and why?

My favorite case was the German case: the Hinterkaifeck Murders. I liked learning about this bizarre murder of a family in a different country, at a different time. Not just because it was shocking, but because I had never even heard of it before, and usually, with crimes of this nature, even if it happens overseas...you usually hear something. However, the author took the time to explain what was going on in the country and to some extent, the world at that time, and it was clear why no one heard anything of this horrible crime, that if today, it had happened, we would definitely have heard at least something. It is fascinating that it is still unsolved, but that a group is now working on it with new technology and are hopeful they may resolve it. It was just a fascinating case, from the gruesomeness to the cultural differences, to the politics of the time, to what is happening today with the case.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

I really had a hard time with the performance of this audiobook. My main issue with the narration was that the narrator consistently mispronounced names. Names of people and names of places. In the Amanda Knox story, he mispronounced the names of two of the suspects, in the Celeste Ahrens Murder story, he misprounced her last name and the name of the British constabulary that handled the investigation. He mispronounced SO many things throughout the course of the book that it became hard for me to concentrate on the story at times, because I would literally flinch when it would happen. Then my mind would correct him in frustration and by the time I tuned back in I had missed two sentences. I don't know. Perhaps that sort of thing is not important to some people, but I like precision and accuracy when I am listening to something, and it threw me off every single time he referenced something incorrectly.
Other than the mispronunciations (which was a pretty big thing for me), the narration was ok. The speed and cadence and tone were all satisfactory. It was not an unpleasant voice to listen to. I would just suggest, with respect, that the narrator maybe do a little research to see how certain names and places are pronounced instead of just trying to guess by using phonics.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

See the section about my favorite case.