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Sue

Wellington, Australia
  • 4
  • reviews
  • 9
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  • 4
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  • The Taliban Shuffle

  • Strange Days in Afghanistan and Pakistan
  • By: Kim Barker
  • Narrated by: Kirsten Potter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 410
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 357
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 357

Kim Barker is not your typical, impassive foreign correspondent—she is candid, self-deprecating, laugh-out-loud funny. At first an awkward newbie in Afghanistan, she grows into a wisecracking, seasoned reporter with grave concerns about our ability to win hearts and minds in the region. In The Taliban Shuffle, Barker offers an insider’s account of the “forgotten war” in Afghanistan and Pakistan, chronicling the years after America’s initial routing of the Taliban, when we failed to finish the job.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Warring Your Way to Peace Does Not Work

  • By Sue on 09-01-12

Warring Your Way to Peace Does Not Work

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-01-12

War is not the answer was the overwhelming message I took from "The Taliban Shuffle". Through her personal experiences as a correspondent in Afghanistan and Pakistan, Kim Barker gives a vivid account of the real situation there.

In one Afghan village Barker visited, the US army was about to withdraw, having trained the local people. There were two broken Humvies, with no equipment or knowledge to repair them. There was not even a pen. This is just one of the many stories which illustrates the shambles the coalition will leave behind when they withdraw.

Listening, I could taste the dust my mouth, feel my backside being pinched and be horrified by the senseless violence taking place.

Through all of this, Barker managed to make me laugh. But then, tragedy and comedy can be very closely associated.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Memory of Running

  • By: Ron McLarty
  • Narrated by: Ron McLarty
  • Length: 13 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,358
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,520
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,512

In late 2003, in his column in Entertainment Weekly, Stephen King called The Memory of Running "the best novel you won't read this year." This glowing endorsement of the audiobook resulted in Ron McLarty receiving a $2 million two-book deal from Viking Penguin. Also, Warner Brothers has shelled out big bucks for the movie rights to The Memory of Running, for which McLarty will write the script.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Funny and Fascinating, A Wonderful Book

  • By Ripp on 02-18-04

You can change your life.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-12

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. This remarkable narrative not only describes the transformation of a person from hopelessness to strength, but the background of 1990's America is fascinating. How Smithy's family holds together under the strain of a mentally ill daughter, focussing so much energy and love into her care, grieving when she disappears, is inspirational. The humour with which characters such as Smithy's uncle Count are dealt with is wonderful. The human failings of Smithy, such as ignoring Norma after her accident when she is confined to a wheel chair, makes it all the easier to relate to him. It is beautifully read, and i just could not stop listening to it.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Smithy, because I could see aspects of myself and many others in his character.

What does Ron McLarty bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Ron McLarty's empathy for Smithy comes through in his narration.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

Smithy's phone calls to Norma and the silences within those phone calls.

Any additional comments?

Highly recommended.

  • The City of Joy

  • By: Dominique Lapierre
  • Narrated by: Michael York
  • Length: 3 hrs and 5 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 62
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 41
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 40

In this inspiring work, Dominique Lapierre tells stories of extraordinary love and heroism - performed by ordinary people. Deep within one of the poorest sections of Calcutta, Lapierre found that this city, which produced Mother Teresa, had many other selfless inhabitants.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful

  • By Rebecca on 01-24-08

All to vivid description of poverty in Calcutta

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-12

Would you listen to The City of Joy again? Why?

No I wouldn't listen again, but I might read the book.

What was the most compelling aspect of this narrative?

The strength and hope shown by people living under such appalling conditions.

Would you be willing to try another one of Michael York’s performances?

No, unless he used a less soppy tone in what he was reading.

What’s the most interesting tidbit you’ve picked up from this book?

That once the slum area had become known because of the work being done there, it changed, not always to the benefit of the inhabitants.

Any additional comments?

Having just read a history of the East India Company and Britain's colonial occupation of India, the narrative of this book illustrates so completely the damage perpetrated by foreign powers sucking the wealth out of nations.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Creativity, Natural Philosophy, and Science

  • By: David Bohm
  • Narrated by: Michael Toms
  • Length: 52 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 79
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 46
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 45

One of the foremost theoretical physicists in the world, the late David Bohm, tells why science has become specialized and fragmented at the cost of its soul. He describes his theory of the implicate order and goes on to explore its implications for human consciousness.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • David Bohm, Creativity etc

  • By Sue on 06-16-10

David Bohm, Creativity etc

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-16-10

This is a "must listen" for those fascinated by David Bohm's work in applying the findings of Quatum Theory to the bigger picture. To hear his voice as he articulates his ideas in an enquiring, non emphatic manner is wonderful.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful