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Jeff Scott

Fair Haven, VT
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 32
  • helpful votes
  • 8
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A Serial Killer's Daughter audiobook cover art

Not For Everyone, But...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-19

I found this book fascinating, but it’s not for everyone. Listeners with a generalized interest in true crime will probably be disappointed. If you can’t at least tolerate the Christian worldview (regardless of your personal beliefs) you’ll find this to be unlistenable. However, for patient listeners, I assure you there could be no weirder listening experience than listening to this book and “Inside the Mind of BTK” by John Douglas back to back. I’ve listened to this book twice now, and all I can say at this point is that I’m seriously fearful the author of this book might one day read “Inside the Mind”. It’s clear she hasn’t, for understandable reasons, but I just....I don’t know. The two books together leave me with so many questions I would be afraid to ask this author (who is, no doubt, a remarkable and courageous woman). If you can read this with a compassionate heart this is well worth your time, but to “get it” you definitely need to know the details of the BTK case from another source/criminological perspective. I’ll be listening to both several more times trying to reconcile the elements of truth both contain.

25 of 27 people found this review helpful

Black Dahlia Avenger audiobook cover art

Complicated Reaction

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-27-18

Kevin Pierce is the best “True(?) Crime” narrator out there so of course he earns a 5.

The book is engaging and well written, so I could have given up to 4 stars on “Story” if you think of “Story” as strictly entertainment value. Unfortunately, if you market the story as “The Truth” then fail so miserably living up to that claim, the end result is not a “bad” book—you wind up with a story worth your contempt . The author bends every remark and circumstance encountered toward his pet theory of the to the case to the exclusion of other interpretations—and presents them as fact. Here and there we see some excellent analysis, but the foundation of the entire book is built on sand that never stabilizes and long trees of analysis stemming from dubious premises. I was also very put off by the author’s insistence on always saying “Father” this and “Father” that when referring to his dad as a suspect. Serves to highlight the author’s confirmation bias and lack of objectivity. Also, be warned that around hour 12 or 13 we increasingly descend into full blown tinfoil hat territory.

If facts really matter to you, this book will infuriate you and you should avoid it. On the other hand, if you like engaging with strange ideas and their overall coherence doesn’t really matter, there is certainly a lot to like here.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

The Last Victim audiobook cover art

A must for True Crime fans

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-24-18

This is a fascinating, brutally honest account of a young man of 18 who constructed fictitious personas to correspond with high profile serial killers. It’s a wild ride in which the author successfully manipulates killers who are themselves expert manipulators.

The narration can be a little grating, but is much improved by changing the speed to 1.25x.

I’m also profoundly disappointed with the lack of an epilogue/afterward discussing the circumstances surrounding the author’s eventual suicide at age 31 (long after completing this project). It is vital to the story that this element be addressed even if the circumstances remain unclear.

Bringing Columbia Home audiobook cover art

Consider What You’re Looking For

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-11-18

This book is primarily an account of the recovery of Columbia’s debris and how the tragedy impacted those involved. Considering the topic, I found the writing to be relentlessly upbeat to an extent that was almost strange. If you’re looking for a sophisticated technical analysis of the accident or a critical/objective examination of the culture at NASA, this book will disappoint. It’s an account that seems to skate over some of the thornier questions about what happened and in which no one ever does anything wrong or gets too angry. It focuses instead on acts of human decency and the nobility of the space program, which is fine, but perhaps not rigorously analytical.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

Challenger Revealed audiobook cover art
  • Challenger Revealed
  • An Insider's Account of How the Reagan Administration Caused the Greatest Tragedy of the Space Age
  • By: Richard C. Cook
  • Narrated by: Richard C. Cook

Great book, poor sound quality

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-28-16

This insider's account of the Challenger disaster and the subsequent investigation is gripping and extremely credible. There is no grandstanding here. The author is objective, likeable, and genuinely humble as the catalyst leaking the documents that sparked a chain reaction blowing the lid off what really happened before and after the fateful Challenger launch decision. This is also a book about moral courage. Highly technical in places.

Unfortunately, the production quality is very poor. I can put up with that, but when you hear papers shuffling in the background or tiny fragments where they obviously had to patch sentences. That's not such a big deal but sometimes you can hear the guy swallowing his own spit every 30 seconds. If you need a perfect narrator to get through a book, you might struggle with this one. Nonetheless, if you are interested in the details of the Challenger tragedy it's still an absolute must.

One more thing: if you are worried that that this is a tinfoil hat conspiracy theorist, or a political vendetta against "Ronald Reagen: aka SATAN", I assure you those concerns would be misplaced. This book could hardly be more mild mannered and fair. When he states an opinion, he knows it's an opinion. Super professional and well researched.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

How I Helped O. J. Get Away with Murder audiobook cover art

OJ's Inner Circle

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-16

Interesting listen if you're interested in the case. Chronicles events through the eyes of OJ's former agent and close friend. The Sleaze is strong with this author--not a character to be admired--but the book seems fairly credible and honest. A good account of the aftermath of the acquittal and how OJ's life fell apart that is extremely self-pitying because the trial cost him his lifestyle. Reminds me of "With Hitler to the End" by Hitler's valet. If you're interested in the Simpson case this will give you unique, obscure details to plug in to the larger story.