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Leonard

  • 68
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  • 148
  • helpful votes
  • 71
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  • The Caveman

  • By: Jørn Lier Horst
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 10 hrs and 7 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 197
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 181
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 183

Viggo Hansen was a man nobody ever noticed, even though he lived in the midst of a close-knit community. His death doesn't hit the headlines, but there is something about the case that catches the attention of William Wisting's journalist daughter, Line, and she decides to write a newspaper article with a different twist for the festive season: the portrait of a completely anonymous and obscure person whose death goes unremarked and unmourned.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Surprise Christmas Gift

  • By Christina Crawford on 11-09-15

Another Great Mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

I have to admit that I do not get very much done when I start listening to another Wisting series mystery. This one was not exception to that rule. The Caveman has more twist and turns than a plate of curly fries and no sooner do you think you know who did it, you find out you were wrong. Saul Reichlin's narration is exceptional.

My only problem with the series is that I only have one more remaining. Hopefully, there will be a audio version of the author's new book "The Katharina Code" in a series called "The Cold Case Quartet" due out in the UK in December

  • The Fate of Rome

  • Climate, Disease, and the End of an Empire
  • By: Kyle Harper
  • Narrated by: Andrew Garman
  • Length: 15 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 95
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80

Interweaving a grand historical narrative with cutting-edge climate science and genetic discoveries, Kyle Harper traces how the fate of Rome was decided not just by emperors, soldiers, and barbarians but also by volcanic eruptions, solar cycles, climate instability, and devastating viruses and bacteria. He takes listeners from Rome's pinnacle in the second century, when the empire seemed an invincible superpower, to its unraveling by the seventh century, when Rome was politically fragmented and materially depleted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent meld of History & Science

  • By Trebla on 02-07-18

Really Boring

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-15-18

I was hoping for some new insight behind the decline of Rome. However, this was not what I envisioned. The narrator at time was extremely flat and overall the book was just boring

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • London Rules

  • Slough House Series, Book 5
  • By: Mick Herron
  • Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
  • Length: 11 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 92
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 88
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 87

At MI5 headquarters Regent's Park, First Desk Claude Whelan is learning the rule (cover your arse) the hard way. Tasked with protecting a beleaguered prime minister, he's facing attack from all directions himself. Over at Slough House, the MI5 satellite office for outcast and demoted spies, the agents are struggling with personal problems: repressed grief, various addictions, retail paralysis, and the nagging suspicion that their newest colleague is a psychopath. Plus someone is trying to kill Roddy Ho. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Say it’s not so. There must be more in the series, please.

  • By Kathleen Walsh on 08-25-18

Always a Great Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

I have been waiting for this volume of the Slough House series to come out in audio version and this work did not disappoint. Just wish it did not end

  • The Hunting Dogs

  • By: Jørn Lier Horst
  • Narrated by: Saul Reichlin
  • Length: 9 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 835
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 756
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 755

Seventeen years ago William Wisting led the investigation into one of Norway's most notorious criminal cases, the murder of young Cecilia Linde. When it is discovered that evidence was falsified, he is suspended from duty. It looks like a man has been wrongly convicted, and suddenly the media are baying for blood. Wisting, who has spent his life hunting criminals, is now the hunted.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent, thoughtful police procedural

  • By L. K. on 01-12-15

Another Great Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-18

I am so happy I chanced on the William Wisting series of crime novels. This particular one has some great twist and turns in the plot and it is spell binding how Horst solves the riddles. I was literally hooked on listening until the ending for three hours. Also Saul Reichlin's narration was flawless.

My only regret about this book is that I only have two more in the series to listen to and then there will be none.

  • The Murderer in Ruins

  • CI Frank Stave, Book 1
  • By: Cay Rademacher
  • Narrated by: Mark Meadows
  • Length: 10 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 27

Hamburg, 1947. A ruined city occupied by the British who bombed it, experiencing the coldest winter in living memory. Food is scarce; refugees and the homeless crowd into shantytowns and sheds. There is a killer on the loose, and all attempts to find him or her have failed. Plagued with worry about his missing son, Frank Stave is a career policeman with a tragedy in his past that is driving his determination to find the killer.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very entertaining

  • By Maine Knitter on 10-08-17

A Great Find!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-23-18

I'm always happy to find a new murder mystery series and CI Frank Stave books are a welcome addition. It does run a bit long in places, but I will chalk that up to character development. The writer also gives a great description of the what life was like in post-WWII Germany. There are a lot of twists and turns for the listener to enjoy. I've added Book 2 of the series to my wish list and am looking forward to enjoying it.

  • Babylon Berlin

  • Gereon Rath, Book 1
  • By: Volker Kutscher
  • Narrated by: Mark Meadows
  • Length: 18 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 60
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 53
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 52

Berlin, 1929. Detective Inspector Rath was a successful career officer in the Cologne Homicide Division before a shooting incident in which he inadvertently killed a man. He has been transferred to the vice squad in Berlin, a job he detests even though he finds a new friend in his boss, Chief Inspector Wolter. There is seething unrest in the city, and the Commissioner of Police has ordered the vice squad to ruthlessly enforce the ban on May Day demonstrations.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • It's no Bernie Gunther Mystery ...

  • By Brian English on 01-28-18

Hope More Titles Come to Audible

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-18

When I read the previous reviews for this novel, I was hesitant to download the book. I am a big Bernie Gunther fan, so that is a high bar for inter-war Berlin mysteries to clear.

However, I am happy I did choose to listen. The plot was good, although a bit slow at times. I also enjoyed Mark Meadows' narration. Overall, the novel probably could be a bit shorter, however, I chalk that up to character development.

I have already loaded the second Gereon Rath novel to my wish list. It will have to wait, there is a new Bernie novel to enjoy

  • The Draining Lake

  • An Inspector Erlendur Novel, Book 4
  • By: Arnaldur Indridason
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 9 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 294
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 257
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 258

In the wake of an earthquake, the water level of an Icelandic lake drops suddenly, revealing the skeleton of a man half-buried in its sandy bed. It is clear immediately that it has been there for many years. There is a large hole in the skull. Yet more mysteriously, a heavy communication device is attached to it, possibly some sort of radio transmitter, bearing inscriptions in Russian. The police are called in and Erlendur, Elinborg, and Sigurdur Olii begin their investigation, which gradually leads them back to the time of the Cold War when bright, left-wing students would be sent from Iceland to study in the "heavenly state" of communist East Germany.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A delightfully dark and twisted story

  • By LukeJ on 10-19-16

Just When You Thought . . . .

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-18

you had it all figured out, the final twist of fate is revealed.

I have very much enjoyed the Erlendur mysteries and this one did not disappoint in the least. My only problem is I am running out of books.

  • The Counterrevolution

  • How Our Government Went to War Against Its Own Citizens
  • By: Bernard E. Harcourt
  • Narrated by: Stephen R. Thorne
  • Length: 9 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 3
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 3

Militarized police officers with tanks and drones. Pervasive government surveillance and profiling. Social media that distract and track us. All of these, contends Bernard E. Harcourt, are facets of a new and radical governing paradigm in the United States - one rooted in the modes of warfare originally developed to suppress anticolonial revolutions and, more recently, to prosecute the war on terror. The Counterrevolution is a penetrating and disturbing account of the rise of counterinsurgency, first as a military strategy but increasingly as a way of ruling ordinary Americans.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Just Like Lying With Statistics

  • By Leonard on 03-11-18

Just Like Lying With Statistics

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-11-18

In 1954, Darrell Huff wrote "How to Lie with Statistics". Although intended to be an introduction to statistics for a generalist, Huff showed the reader, among other things, how statistics could be manipulated to skew reality. In his book, Professor Harcourt uses simplistic statements of fact to also skew reality toward a theory of the US government waging an insurgency war against the US people.

For example, in the introduction Harcourt states that Donald Trump filled his cabinet with such insurgency warriors as H.R. McMaster, Jim Mattis and John Kelly, all of whom served in the Iraq and Afghan wars. Would Professor Harcourt say the same about Barack Obama? He appointed Chuck Hagel, John Kelly and David Petraeus to serve in his cabinet. They all served in America's insurgency war in Viet Nam! Petraeus wrote a field manual on counter-insurgency warfare. Did Obama select him as his spy chief so he could bring his counter-insurgency skills to bear in a war against the American people? Somehow I think not, but Harcourt does not point out the similarity in administrative staffing. People fight the wars they are handed, not the ones they would like to fight

Another incident Harcourt cites is the first-ever use of an armed robot by Dallas police against a "suspect" as an example of police insurgency tactics. He does not elaborate and tell his audience the "suspect" Micah Johnson ambushed Dallas police providing protection for a Next Generation Action Network demonstration. The ambush resulted in the killing of five police officers, the wounding of two civilians and nine other police officers. Following a standoff, police did in fact use a bomb attached to an bomb disposal robot. I guess Professor Harcourt would have preferred they storm his position in a frontal assault

There are always at least two sides to a story. However, oversimplifying and excluding pertinent facts are tantamount to lying with statistics. It is also why intelligent discourse seems to be absent in modern society.

The narration was very good, however, I would not recommend this book for use as kindling.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Silence of the Grave

  • Reykjavik Murder Mysteries, Book 2
  • By: Arnaldur Indridason
  • Narrated by: George Guidall
  • Length: 8 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 505
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 449
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 451

When a skeleton is discovered half-buried in a construction site outside of ReykjavIk, Inspector Erlendur finds himself knee-deep in both a crime scene and an archeological dig. Bone by bone, the body is unearthed, and the brutalizing history of a family who lived near the building site comes to light along with it. Was the skeleton a man or a woman, a victim or a killer, and is this a simple case of murder or a long-concealed act of justice?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Lovely, Dark & Deep

  • By dwhith on 11-26-14

More Twists and Turns Then SF's Lombard Street

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-18

I've enjoyed Indridason's novels and I don't know why I had overlooked this one. The story line keeps you quessing and trying to figure out who-dunnit. As always, the narration was fantastic. Always an enjoyable listen and hard to stop listening

  • Equal of the Sun

  • A Novel
  • By: Anita Amirrezvani
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 13 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 539
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 489
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 491

Iran in 1576 is a place of peace, wealth, and dazzling beauty. But when the Shah dies without having named an heir, the court is thrown into tumult. Princess Pari, the Shah's daughter and closest adviser, knows more about the inner workings of the state than almost anyone, but the princess's maneuvers to instill order after her father's sudden death incite resentment and dissent. Pari and her trusted servant, a eunuch able to navigate the harem as well as the world beyond the palace walls, are in possession of an incredible tapestry....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Woman in a Man's World

  • By JGrace on 06-26-13

Beautifully Written and Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-18

Every so often a book comes along which the reader should savor like a gift. This is one of those books. I was not familiar with the authors work and just happened to chance on it at a local bookstore. After reading the flyleaf, I thought I would give it a try.

A Safavid version of the 1001 Arabian nights, a picture is weaved of the palace intrigues of 16th century Persian court life with sibling betraying sibling, power hungry courtiers and rival clans. All the ingredients for a great novel. Of course, Simon Vance's narration smoothly slips from prose to the poetry of court conversation.

This is a book that one can easily enjoy with a robust plot that very much entertains

1 of 1 people found this review helpful