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  • 304
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  • 1,418
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  • Feeding the Dragon

  • By: Sharon Washington
  • Narrated by: Sharon Washington
  • Length: 1 hr and 17 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,301
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,837
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,812

Sharon Washington’s autobiographical one-woman play, Feeding the Dragon, delighted audiences off-Broadway and is now available exclusively on Audible. The one-act play invites listeners into Sharon’s unorthodox childhood, growing up in an apartment on the top floor of the St. Agnes Branch of the New York Public Library, where her father served as the building’s custodian. A love of literature and boundless imagination helped the playwright as a young woman persevere over dragons of all forms.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent story!

  • By Imara Walker on 09-07-18

Feeding the Dragon

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-09-18

Absolutely fabulous! Thank you Audible for the chance to listen to this wonderful performance. AND it was free. It doesn’t get any better than this.

  • Benediction

  • By: Kent Haruf
  • Narrated by: Mark Bramhall
  • Length: 8 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 262
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 240
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 240

From the beloved and best-selling author of Plainsong and Eventide comes a story of life and death, and the ties that bind, once again set out on the High Plains in Holt, Colorado. When Dad Lewis is diagnosed with terminal cancer, he and his wife, Mary, must work together to make his final days as comfortable as possible. Their daughter, Lorraine, hastens back from Denver to help look after him....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • perfect.

  • By joyce on 08-27-15

A Blessing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-13

A benediction is a blessing and that is exactly what this book is. Kent Haruf writes about the lives of ordinary people in such a way that I'm left feeling I know them and remember them. I wrote a similar comment when reviewing Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner. Haruf's ability to look into the soul of his characters reminds me of Stegner.

Benediction is about Dad Lewis who is dying of cancer. The story revolves around his experiences and those of the people who are close to him. It's an unhurried book perfect in it's simplicity. There are no earth shattering twists to the plot. Beautifully written and expertly narrated by Mark Bramhall, it never slides into sentimentality. Ultimately this is an uplifting story that reveals the ways we live and the values we live by. I strongly recommend it and Haruf's other books as well.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Sweet Tea and Jesus Shoes

  • By: Sandra Chastain, Deborah Smith, Donna Ball, and others
  • Narrated by: Lee Ann Howlett
  • Length: 4 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

Come sit on the porch a spell. Let's talk about times gone by and folks we remember, about slow summer evenings and lightning bugs in a jar. Listen to the music of a creaky swing and hand-cranked ice cream and cicadas chorusing in the sultry night air. Let's talk about how things used to be in the South - and for some of us, they way they still are. Welcome to the world of Sweet Tea and Jesus Shoes, where award winning authors Deborah Smith, Sandra Chastain, Virginia Ellis, Debra Dixon, Donna Ball and Nancy Knight come together for the first time to create this poignant, humorous collection of nostalgic tales.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Southern short stories

  • By MissSusie66 on 08-15-13

A Taste of Southern Life

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-10-13

Sweet Tea and Jesus Shoes is a charming collection of stories of the South. They range from sweetly sentimental to laugh out loud funny. It is an easy light listen and though I liked some stories better than others I did enjoy all of them. Unfortunately, I did not particularly like Lee Ann Howlett's narration. She wasn't so bad I had to stop listening. I just kept thinking these delightful stories deserved so much better. Despite my criticism of the narration, I do recommend Sweet Tea and Jesus Shoes.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Dark Places

  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Lorelei King
  • Length: 11 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 135
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 133

Libby Day was just seven years old when her older brother massacred her family while she hid in a cupboard. Her evidence helped put him away. Ever since then she has been drifting, surviving for over 20 years on the proceeds of the 'Libby Day fund'. But now the money is running out and Libby is desperate. When she is offered $500 to do a guest appearance, she feels she has to accept. But this is no ordinary gathering.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • read all three books and im really a fan

  • By msdtan on 08-10-14

Not for the fainthearted!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-13

Dark Places is the story of Libby Day who, in 1985, helped a jury convict her 15 year-old brother Ben for the brutal murder of her mother and sisters. Now, 25 years later, Ben remains in prison and the money in Libby's trust fund is gone. Unwilling to find a job, Libby accepts an offer from a secret society obsessed with notorious crimes. The Kill Society offer to pay Libby to interview Ben and others about the massacre and they are eager to buy family mementos from her.

The story unfolds in alternating chapters between Libby in the present and her family in the hours leading up to the murders. The characters are vivid and believable though not very likable.The chapters play off each other perfectly exposing layer upon layer of ugliness.Gillian Flynn has had the courage to depict the long term damage and consequences of a brutal murder. She almost dares the reader to look away.

This novel succeeds on so many levels. It made me think about what happens to the survivors in the headlines or on the news. In the media limelight they are showered with sympathy, years later they are all but forgotten.

Dark Places is a masterpiece of cold blooded horror. It is not for the squeamish. There is graphic violence to humans and animals. There is sexual content and language that some may find offensive.

If you're looking for a dark (really dark!) mystery that is well crafted and competently narrated, then this is the book for you. I actually enjoyed it more than Gone Girl.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Storyteller

  • By: Jodi Picoult
  • Narrated by: Mozhan Marno, Jennifer Ikeda, Edoardo Ballerini, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 13 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,214
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,193
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,199

Jodi Picoult's poignant number one New York Times best-selling novels about family and love tackle hot-button issues head on. In The Storyteller, Sage Singer befriends Josef Weber, a beloved Little League coach and retired teacher. But then Josef asks Sage for a favor she never could have imagined - to kill him. After Josef reveals the heinous act he committed, Sage feels he may deserve that fate. But would his death be murder or justice?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect title especially for the audio format!

  • By Abby R. on 03-05-13

I miss the old Jodi Picoult!

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-25-13

Jodi Picoult fans will be familiar with her usual formula of court-room drama and moral dilemmas. Her endings are never quite spelled out and the ultimate decision about what happens is left for the reader to decide. While still dealing with moral issues, the court-room drama is missing this time. The Storyteller is an historical novel that uses the Holocaust to explore guilt, responsibility and family. Like all Picoult's novels, The Storyteller is exceptionally well researched and the narration is outstanding. However,I did not find the story at all compelling. Vampires? Really? It just did not work for me and yes I did get the analogy Picoult tried to make but it was so unnecessary. All the characters, except the grandmother, felt shallow and contrived. I simply couldn't engage with a disfigured reclusive (not to mention self centered) baker, a 90 year old Nazi who is suddenly overtaken with remorse and a barista who speaks only in haiku (I got distracted counting syllables). Meanwhile, Jesus appears in a loaf of bread, a vampire wrecks havoc in a small village and three sisters are called Sage, Pepper and Saffron. Honestly, it could have been a comedy if it weren't for the grandmother's story. When I was listening to the chapters about Minka growing up in Poland and her time in the concentration camps, I was totally engrossed. It was disturbing and devastating and so unlike the rest of the book. I wanted much more of Minka and much less of everything else.

I used to be Jodi Picoult fan. I have read almost all of her novels but with each new book recently, she tries the same old formula and fails miserably. I miss the days when Picoult wrote novels that I could get lost in and that didn't bore me to death or make me roll my eyes in disbelief.

  • Orphan Train

  • A Novel
  • By: Christina Baker Kline
  • Narrated by: Jessica Almasy, Suzanne Toren
  • Length: 8 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18,363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,351
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,363

Penobscot Indian Molly Ayer is close to "aging out" out of the foster care system. A community-service position helping an elderly woman clean out her home is the only thing keeping Molly out of juvie and worse.... As she helps Vivian sort through her possessions and memories, Molly learns that she and Vivian aren’t as different as they seem to be. A young Irish immigrant orphaned in New York City, Vivian was put on a train to the Midwest with hundreds of other children whose destinies would be determined by luck and chance.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Moving story of sharing and transformation.

  • By Kathi on 04-03-13

Powerful Historical Fiction

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-13

Between 1854 - 1929 up to 250,000 children whose parents were dead or no longer able to care for them were transported from the East Coast to rural Midwest, Canada and Mexico. Families interested in adoption came to the train station to look them over and placements were often made with little or no attempt to ensure the children's safety or well-being. Unfortunately, many were used as slave labor by those who took them in.

Orphan Train is a fictional account of Vivian who, at 9 years old, was sent on the orphan train to Minnesota. Now 91 years of age, she befriends 17 year old Molly who has been in foster care most her life. The stories of Vivian and Molly run parallel throughout the book and although they seem an unlikely pair a strong bond develops.

Orphan Train is an enjoyable and inspiring listen with enough depth to the characters to keep me invested in their stories.The narration was the only let down for me but it wasn't bad enough to make me want to stop listening. It's a good read that I am happy to recommend.

40 of 45 people found this review helpful

  • The View on the Way Down

  • By: Rebecca Wait
  • Narrated by: Mandy Weston, Carl Prekopp
  • Length: 7 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 38
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

The View on the Way Down captures the insidious, sometimes violent, force of depression and its ability to tip lives into chaos. Gripping, moving, and ultimately hopeful, The View on the Way Down will have you rooting for the family’s redemption. Rebecca Wait graduated from Oxford University in 2010 with a first class degree in English, having been mentored by the poet and novelist Craig Raine at New College. She’s been writing since she was a child and has won numerous prizes for short stories and plays.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful Debut Novel - I LOVED THIS BOOK

  • By Tango on 04-13-13

A Powerful First Novel

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-13

The View on the Way Down is about the different ways grief and loss affect the lives of the family left behind. The publishers summary makes it clear that one of teenage Emma's brothers has died and part 1 is told from her point of view. Bullied at school, disillusioned with God and becoming ever more miserable at home, she turns to food for comfort. Emma's parents response to the tragedy is to retreat into their own misery barely acknowledging each other or Emma. They are all estranged from the surviving brother.
Put this way, the story sounds simplistic. But don't be fooled by the simple almost gentle way the story unfolds. This book is powerful. It is well researched beautifully written and expertly narrated. I highly recommend this truly amazing story from first time author 25 year old Rebecca Wait. She apparently wrote The View on the Way Down in the evening while working as a teachers assistant. I eagerly await her next novel.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Into the Darkest Corner

  • By: Elizabeth Haynes
  • Narrated by: David Thorpe, Karen Cass
  • Length: 13 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,341
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,042
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,042

Catherine has been enjoying the single life for long enough to know a good catch when she sees one. Gorgeous, charismatic, spontaneous – Lee seems almost too perfect to be true. And her friends clearly agree, as each in turn falls under his spell. But there is a darker side to Lee. His erratic, controlling and sometimes frightening behaviour means that Catherine is increasingly isolated. Driven into the darkest corner of her world, and trusting no one, she plans a meticulous escape.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • AN OCD IS STALKED BY A PSYCHOPATH

  • By Betty on 06-05-12

Spine Chilling

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-02-13

If you liked the movie Sleeping With The Enemy, I believe you will like this book. It is a spine chilling psychological thriller that kept me awake at night and had me checking the door locks. Although some reviewers found the switching between two time periods confusing, I believe Elizabeth Haynes handles the movement between past and present well. The suspense in each period adds to the other, resulting in a story of rising tension. This book is well researched and gives good insight into PTSD and OCD as a result of domestic violence. The strength of the writing and dialogue ensured I found the characters believable. Into The Darkest Corner is a dark and twisted tale. It contains profanity, violence and some moderately graphic sexual content. If these things bother you, then this is not the book for you. The narrators were good, I found them easy on the ear though not the best I've ever heard. I recommend this book and in fact this author. I have since listened to two more of her books and enjoyed both of them.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Code Name Verity

  • By: Elizabeth Wein
  • Narrated by: Morven Christie, Lucy Gaskell
  • Length: 10 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,589
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,963
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,943

Code Name Verity is a compelling, emotionally rich story with universal themes of friendship and loyalty, heroism and bravery. Two young women from totally different backgrounds are thrown together during World War II: one a working-class girl from Manchester, the other a Scottish aristocrat, one a pilot, the other a wireless operator. Yet whenever their paths cross, they complement each other perfectly and before long become devoted friends. But then a vital mission goes wrong....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Haunting, Beautiful, Exquisite, Special Book

  • By Suzn F on 07-21-13

Do Not Read Any (other) Reviews of this Book!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-12

Believe me when I say, you do not want to read about this book before you actually listen to it. There is absolutely no way to write a review without giving away spoilers..no way at all! All I will say is that it is a poignant story of friendship and survival by turns funny, sad and scary. It is wonderfully written and narrated and it will stay with you long after you have finished listening. In fact, I can almost guarantee it is a book you will listen to a second time.

179 of 191 people found this review helpful

  • People of the Book

  • By: Geraldine Brooks
  • Narrated by: Edwina Wren
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 71
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 44
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 44

In 1996, Hanna Heath, a rare-book expert, is offered the job of a lifetime: analysis and conservation of the famed Sarajevo Haggadah, which has been rescued during the Bosnian war. Priceless and beautiful, the book is one of the earliest Jewish volumes ever to be illuminated with images. When Hanna discovers a series of artifacts in its ancient binding, she begins to unlock the book's mysteries. The reader is ushered into an exquisitely detailed past, tracing the book's journey from its salvation back to its creation.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent book, some narration problems

  • By Starr on 03-02-11

Wait for the movie

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-25-12

This book could have been so much better. The format was promising and it is clearly well researched but the central character is irritating and superficial. I became engrossed in the historical fiction which was fascinating. I'd have given the story 4 stars if Brooks had left out the present day nonsense with it's angst and contrived love affair. As for the ending, well, don't get me started on that! The whole thing reads like a screenplay-hence the title of this review. The narration is mediocre. At times, Wren's depiction of the characters is irritating but it wasn't enough to stop me listening.