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  • Sweet Ruin

  • Immortals After Dark, Book 16
  • By: Kresley Cole
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 14 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,924
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,781
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,775

Growing up, orphaned Josephine didn't know who or what she was - just that she was "bad", an outcast with strange powers. Protecting her baby brother, Thaddeus, became her entire life. The day he was taken away began Jo's transition from angry girl...to would-be superhero...to enchanting villain.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • EXCEEDED EXPECTATION!

  • By BluBumbleB on 12-28-15

If I could give it 6 stars I would.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-03-15

Kresley Cole is a hands down all around knockout writer.
I've never been on the edge of my seat for a 10+ hour book before, but this edition had me unable to press the pause button. Its funny, edgy, heartbreaking, and explicit. It shows what happens when an immortal falls through the cracks, and it shows what our favorite characters can look like seen from the outside.

Robert Petkoff is a saint, and he does pretty well maintaining characters in such a long book. (14 hours! booyah!)

If you've listened to any of Cole's other work, you are in for a major treat. If you're new to the IAD series, its going to be a lot to process, but I'd still recommend it. I loved this book.

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Touch of the Demon

  • Kara Gillian, Book 5
  • By: Diana Rowland
  • Narrated by: Liv Anderson
  • Length: 19 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 913
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 838
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 838

Kara Gillian is in some seriously deep trouble. She’s used to summoning supernatural creatures from the demon realm to our world, but now the tables have been turned and she’s the one who’s been summoned. Kara is the prisoner of yet another demonic lord, but she quickly discovers that she’s far more than a mere hostage. Yet waiting for rescue has never been her style, and Kara has no intention of being a pawn in someone else’s game.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Unexpected

  • By Demurr on 11-06-13

This cake is just a brick of fondant

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-15

I really don't know what's happening with this series. When I started it, I was hoping it would be another Molly Harper or Darynda Jones. Book 1 & 2 were fast-paced and coherent enough to keep my attention. Book 3 required some of the characters to pull a nefarious 180 personality shift to even make sense. Book 4 was fun, but the storyline was shaky and disjointed.

Now book 5. I don't even see a plotline here. The story is stuck on a wash cycle where Kara gets hurt physically, metaphysically or emotionally (and often self-inflicted) in a splash gore horror movie kind of way, sleeps, eats, chuckles, 'finds herself' in compromising situations (like getting woken up in the bath), demands attention for having been hurt, has flashbacks of being a 'silly girl', more chuckling and/or sleeping. Makes out with people she barely knows after having professed her love for a man that cares for her in a Tarzan heart Jane kind of way, because she's an adult and that makes it okay.

The demon plane has almost no human females on it, and (as far as we know) no demonic lord females. These lords are supposed to be super manipulative ancient masterminds locked in an eternal power struggle. So I don't understand why they're bending over backwards to humor the main character. It's like Kara got thrown into an Oscar Meyer factory during an earthquake. And she doesn't even spare a thought about not having a job when she gets back. Or if her friends will get through some of the bad juju that's been going down earth-side without her. Shes becomes barely cognitive enough to dress and feed herself.

For no reason, Kara makes out with a demonic lord who she KNOWS is sleeping with another person, while Mzatal eavesdrops via potency... Which is awkward... And all around wtf-ish?... Kara is also supposed to be in her late twenties, which means she's almost old enough to be the teenage summoner she's training alongside's mother. And she starts 'innocently noticing' how ripped he is while she's playing Peeping Tom on his workout. That's what did it. I only had four hours and forty minutes left when I had to pull my earplugs out and turn the book off.

I hate not finishing a book, but I just can't force myself to listen to anymore. I was already just trying to slog through because I am so far against a lot of her life choices, and question a lot of her decisions, but I'm not about to listen to her make out with some kid or string him along.

And having all your characters chuckle automatically at every glimpse of humor, is like laughing enthusiastically at your own wit in a conversation before anyone's had a chance to process the joke. There's a reason comedic authors almost never allow their characters to react to humor unless its to respond with another joke. Read Terry Pratchett. A book is supposed to be the ultimate straight man. You have to let the audience respond to the humor in their own time.

I'm probably going to return this book if I can. If you are okay with a woman 'sleeping with whoever she wants when she wants, no matter what that person's relationship status, or age might be', you probably won't be bothered by this book and it will advance the storyline I guess. I'm a sexual curmudgeon; if I know someone is in a relationship, or doesn't know what a gameboy is, I don't touch. If you want to continue the series but don't want your imagined version of Kara to Charlaine Harris out, I'd recommend skipping past this book and just reading some of the spoiler reviews on Goodreads to piece together what happened here.

7 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • Reamde

  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Malcolm Hillgartner
  • Length: 38 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,895
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,062
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,105

Richard Forthrast created T’Rain, a multibillion-dollar, massively multiplayer online role-playing game. But T’Rain’s success has also made it a target. Hackers have struck gold by unleashing REAMDE, a virus that encrypts all of a player’s electronic files and holds them for ransom. They have also unwittingly triggered a deadly war beyond the boundaries of the game’s virtual universe - and Richard is at ground zero.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Not perfect, but worth a listen.

  • By ShySusan on 10-01-11

An incredible ride.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-13

I can't imagine all the research that went behind writing Stephenson's Reamde, but it's an incredible looping ride. It takes it's time, it could definitely be classified as an 'epic' fiction, as Stephenson uses deliberate extrapolation and minute details to explain some of the more unlikely scenarios in the novel. There are many scenes that are made, in my opinion, unmanageably realistic, especially toward the end, which drags the story on.

It hit close to home when one of the characters are revealed as a child of Sudan. One of my best friends growing up turned out to be adopted from Sudan, and I never knew until he gave a speech for a community college I attended, years later. He lost his entire family, and the details of his march aren't my business to share, but he never mentioned it, he did his best to move on, and made the most of his life, which is a really cheesy and harsh thing to say. When you dwell on your problems, you're only inviting them to continue to hurt you. A lot of North American kids could learn a valuable lesson from him, and from Zula.

I almost wanted to say Stephenson tried to write the Richard Forthrast as a genius level asperger spectrum, but it's actually really doubtful. The way he organizes his life, and his detachment from reality was probably written this way to detail the repercussions on his personality from years of experience with T'Rain, and from managing a huge industry at it's foundation level.

Overall it's truly a great story, and I've listened to it twice since I bought it, although I usually don't repeat huge novels unless I'm reaaally head over heels for them. I don't recommend trying to quote any of the anthropological fiction-facts without at least a Wikipedia trek.

A lot of the research behind Reamde is sound, such as flying low to get under the radar, and wangbas. Some of the research may be true, but is more opinionated, such as the differences between Go and Chess. But, all of it together gives you a small glimpse into what it may be like to grow up in another country, and the culture shock even open minded youths come across when removed from their accustomed environment. The circumstances that carry the story are as likely as winning the lottery, several times, in the same year, and the plot at times gets hair thin, but with Stephenson's deliberation, it's easy to accept the looping piecemeal situations as a more likely scenario then some of the easy answer fast fire action novels.

This book is sticky, and the humanitarian lessons will keep with you long after the epilogue. It's entertaining and masterfully written, and to be honest it was a relief getting a break from novels where the hero uses his arsenal of one-liners to punctuate explosions.

11 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • The Android's Dream

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 10 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,187
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,345
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,341

A human diplomat creates an interstellar incident when he kills an alien diplomat in a most unusual way. To avoid war, Earth's government must find an equally unusual object: A type of sheep ("The Android's Dream"), used in the alien race's coronation ceremony. To find the sheep, the government turns to Harry Creek, ex-cop, war hero and hacker extraordinaire.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Philip K Dick meets Douglas Adams

  • By James on 07-26-11

An interesting reference to Philip K Dick's novel

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-13

I loved Blade Runner, and Do Android's Dream of Electric Sheep, so I was pretty excited to hear this novel, and it didn't disappoint. It wasn't my favorite Scalzi, but it was pretty original. The story starts out vulgar, and I was regretting my purchase with all the flatulence, arterial congestion, and bursting things. Frankly, it may turn you green, until the meat of the story really starts.

Although I could see where certain parts of the story would go, the girl was a creative and viable surprise. Not his strongest story, he uses a few deus ex machinas, but Scalzi is a master of science fiction, and I haven't been disappointed with his work yet. His characters are fun and adaptable. The story keeps a good pace. The alien incarnation representing all of our negative characteristics from the obvious to the subtle, was well thought out. The aliens remain dynamic, yet have built their society around all of our major failings. The Nidu are like a crystal ball showing us what would happen if we let Wal-Mart fashion legal doctrine for the entire world.

9 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • This Book Is Full of Spiders

  • Seriously, Dude, Don't Touch It
  • By: David Wong
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 14 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,433
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,149
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,157

Warning: You may have a huge, invisible spider living in your skull. This is not a metaphor. You will dismiss this as ridiculous fearmongering. Dismissing things as ridiculous fearmongering is, in fact, the first symptom of parasitic spider infection - the creature secretes a chemical into the brain to stimulate skepticism, in order to prevent you from seeking a cure. That’s just as well, since the “cure” involves learning what a chain saw tastes like. You can’t feel the spider, because it controls your nerve endings.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • If You're Considering This... Go Ahead!

  • By Tracey Rains on 05-29-13

Holy Velvet Jesus Painting, My Jimmies Are Rustled

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-13

This book is better written then David Wong's last novel, John Dies At The End. Which was a fun read. Unlike his last, when the plot ambles, it's more on purpose, concise, cleaner, and he doesn't use periods of gross out horror slapstick to cover weak points in the story. There's still gross out horror, but it's intuitive. I mean, it's a book about sentient spiders. Uggghhuuuhhuuherr Blahhhh, my skin is crawling!

I can't remember the last time I was wide awake at 4 AM glaring at shadows in my room, certain that they would suddenly move. Maybe when I was eight? Or since the last time I watched Army of Darkness?

Don't judge. It was scary. I normally don't like horror, but when you get midway through this book you almost have to keep listening, you have to have the narrator tell you that the spiders are taken care of, and that everything will be okay. It's that well written. This book was like a literary roller coaster, terrifying, with just the right kind of humor and humanity to make it exciting. There are some really good intuitions of the human condition, including Wong's take on the Babel Effect, without getting too preachy. The alternate point of views is really interesting, as you get to see situations from every perspective. I would definitely recommend this book.

49 of 54 people found this review helpful

  • Redshirts

  • A Novel with Three Codas
  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 7 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 16,318
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,291
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15,273

Ensign Andrew Dahl has just been assigned to the Universal Union Capital Ship Intrepid, flagship of the Universal Union since the year 2456. Life couldn’t be better…until Andrew begins to pick up on the facts that (1) every Away Mission involves some kind of lethal confrontation with alien forces; (2) the ship’s captain, its chief science officer, and the handsome Lieutenant Kerensky always survive these confrontations; and (3) at least one low-ranked crew member is, sadly, always killed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Clever, creative, and FUN!

  • By Kent on 04-18-13

"Really Funny!" She said.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-05-13

Scalzi still uses 'said' for nearly every exchange of dialogue, which will drive some people really nuts. It's the elephant in the living room for this book. If you don't zero in on it, you might never notice.

Personally, I LOVED the comedy, speed, and pitch of the banter. The first five hours are a huge laugh, with some earnest drama and important life lessons sprinkled in, from first to last. The star trek references are so very classic. And the dramatic pauses and high school theater way the officers make exchanges, then automatically switch to normal speech when not on point. So funny!

This was my first book with this author, and it had me moving happily on to Android's Dream, Agent to the Stars, Fuzzy Nation, and the Old Man's War series. A great find! Fixation on the word 'said' or no.

41 of 44 people found this review helpful

  • Deadhouse Gates

  • Malazan Book of the Fallen, Book 2
  • By: Steven Erikson
  • Narrated by: Ralph Lister
  • Length: 34 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,543
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,244
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,252

In the vast dominion of Seven Cities, in the Holy Desert Raraku, the seer Sha’ik and her followers prepare for the long-prophesied uprising known as the Whirlwind. Unprecedented in size and savagery, this maelstrom of fanaticism and bloodlust will embroil the Malazan Empire in one of the bloodiest conflicts it has ever known, shaping destinies and giving birth to legends.....

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Thirsty Book

  • By Benjamin on 08-06-13

Can't wait for the rest of them!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-27-13

These books really are fantastic!

The beginning of Deadhouse Gates might confuse people following the series. It starts with the Culling in Malazan during the Season of Rot. The story then switches to, among other things, the Rising of the Whirlwind in the Raraku desert, the incarnation of the Sha'ik, the Malaz 7th Army in Seven Cities, and best of all, the meanderings of Icarium and Mappo.

There's more Icarium and Mappo banter! Eeeehehee!

... ...

It's an intricate epic fantasy, and although it will be kind of sort of possible to pickup at Deadhouse Gates (Book 2) without reading Gardens of the Moon (Book 1), you will miss some important plot points which will give the storyline more depth. I would not recommend jumping around in this series. To appreciate it, it's really best to stick to the sequence. Erikson cross references some of his major plot twists from book to book, sometimes, but if he recapped every small plot progression or significant back story between each book, by Crippled God, we would have to flip to chapter twenty three before we were ready to move on with the story. There really is a lot going on, and it's so inter-woven. You may not pick up on everything the first listen through, but again, the story gets so crazy, and Erikson's writing style is so incredibly lyrical, it's still a fun read, and worth listening too, again.

Listening to the audible version breaks everything down into more easily understandable portions, but don't be intimidated if something zips by you. There's even a Malazan Wiki set up to help. This book really has everything, shape changers, solid battle scenes, sun-dried ears, power struggles, senile old erudites, conflicting cultural taboos, pit quarries, resentful convicts, weird drugs, sea monsters, sand.

I can't wait for Midnight Tides! I really hope they keep these coming.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Gate Thief

  • Mithermages, Book 2
  • By: Orson Scott Card
  • Narrated by: Stefan Rudnicki, Emily Rankin
  • Length: 12 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,763
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,335
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,354

Here on Earth, Danny North is still in high school, yet he holds in his heart and mind all the stolen outselves of 13 centuries of gatemages. The Families still want to kill him if they can’t control him - and they can’t control him; he is far too powerful. On Westil, Wad is now nearly powerless - he lost everything to Danny in their struggle. Even if he can survive the revenge of his enemies, he must still somehow make peace with the Gatemage Daniel North, for when Danny took that power from Loki, he also took responsibility for the Great Gates.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Flashes of Great, Ok, and Bad. Overall: Meh.

  • By Benjamin on 04-04-13

He didn't even turn into a golden swan.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-22-13

I agree with the reviews that are put off by the infatuation of teenage pregnancy. Orson Scott Card's books often come across as a pedantically cyclical read, so when the topic get's brought up, suddenly all the teenage girls in the story are obsessed with it in the same very disturbing and stupefied way. Grabbing at men's waists and demanding men 'put their baby inside me,' was an approach my mother must have missed. It's incredibly insulting to young women that this is how their teenage interests are portrayed. Really think about your teenage experience, and try to count on one hand the number of girls in your school, who would do this, and throw themselves at boys like this.

The dialogue is all in the same kidney, this adds to the cycling feeling of the book. It could almost be one person arguing with them self. The sentence structure, word usage, lines of thought, etc. cohere so that there are some golden opportunities for OSC's brand of humor, but it's not often believable that you are listening to several people talk, just one man's interpretation of a conversation.

OSC tackles Christianity, and a lot of other religions, legends, and myths, in this book. I'm not religious, but if you are, fair warning, he reinterprets the big J into his canon. Neil Gaiman did this in American Gods, then went back and edited him out, and it probably saved him some angry readers.

Stefan Rudnicki has a super creaky deep voice, like someone is opening and shutting an old door. Emily Rankin tried to match his voice in this book, which made her voice croak and crack. And to get what they are saying, you can't just dim the volume until you can just barely hear the words. The croaking is still loud before the words fuzz out. It's okay in the short term, but after a few hours it starts to hurt. When I took my ear buds out, I couldn't hear all that well for a few days.

The storyline is original. The plot twists aren't too severe. The book ambles, but it stays pretty cut and dry sequential. It'll be great for a solid OSC fan, but it's not Ender's Game.

19 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • Divine Misfortune

  • By: A. Lee Martinez
  • Narrated by: Fred Berman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 842
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 738
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 744

Teri and Phil had never needed their own personal god. But when Phil is passed up for a promotion - again - it's time to take matters into their own hands. And look online. Choosing a god isn't as simple as you would think. There are too many choices; and they often have very hefty prices for their eternal devotion: blood, money, sacrifices, and vows of chastity. But then they find Luka, raccoon god of prosperity. All he wants is a small cut of their good fortune. Oh - and to crash on their couch for a few days.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Gods Gone Wild

  • By Tango on 12-08-13

Office Space rewritten by Disney

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-06-13

A fun book. An interesting take on religion, benign, not heavy or preachy. Definitely funny, and strangely atheist friendly. There is some extrapolations on humanitarianism, but it stays in the shallow end. A novel approach to the relationships and mythos of deities and their followers.

Divine Misfortune is one of those books that's easy to relate with. A good pick me up listen after your car breaks down, or your boss yells at you. Lucky struck me as kind of douchey Raoul Duke (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas,) but perhaps that was intentional.

17 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Fuzzy Nation

  • By: John Scalzi
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton, John Scalzi - introduction
  • Length: 7 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,757
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,896
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,903

In John Scalzi's re-imagining of H. Beam Piper's 1962 sci-fi classic Little Fuzzy, written with the full cooperation of the Piper Estate, Jack Holloway works alone for reasons he doesnt care to talk about. Hundreds of miles from ZaraCorps headquarters on planet, 178 light-years from the corporations headquarters on Earth, Jack is content as an independent contractor, prospecting and surveying at his own pace. As for his past, thats not up for discussion.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Short, sweet, and satisfying storytelling.

  • By Samuel Montgomery-Blinn on 05-11-11

The legalese is convincing.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-13

This was an engaging remake of the old story.

There were some changes to make Jack Holloway work better with Scalzi's writing style. Scalzi still uses 'he/she/they said' to express every change in dialogue, which can get annoying, if you zero in on it. I didn't really notice it that often, and it wasn't as obvious as in his Old Man's War series.

Throughout the book Scalzi is careful to use Holloway's actions and words to describe his character. You aren't force fed his every thought, which is both a huge relief, but since Holloway is so manipulatively devious, it leaves enough mystery to unfolding events to create doubts on how the space opera plays out.

The little Davids trying to stick it to the industrial corporate Goliath is a delight, and one that will be easy for a lot of today's readers to empathize with.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful