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tru britty

Minnesota
  • 91
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  • 834
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  • Gods and Monsters

  • By: Christopher Bram
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 10 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 63
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 41

This audiobook journeys back to 1957 Los Angeles, where James Whale, the once-famous director of such classics as Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein, is living in retirement, haunted by his past. Rescuing him from his too-vivid imagination is his gardener, a handsome ex-marine. The friendship between these two very different men is sometimes tentative, sometimes touching, often dangerous - and always captivating.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Horror film buffs, don't miss this one!

  • By tru britty on 11-05-18

Horror film buffs, don't miss this one!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-05-18

Christopher Bram has written a poignant, nostalgic and interior novel about James Whale, the Hollywood director of Frankenstein, The Bride of Frankenstein and The Old Dark House.

The novel is based on real-life figures but Bram invents a remarkable fiction around those facts. James Whale has just come out of the hospital after suffering a stroke that has jumbled his brain. The director is past his prime, living in reluctant retirement, but now there is a new hulk of a man, Clayton Boone, to do the yard work and to divert Whale from the tedium of sickness and old age.

Whale was one of the few out gay men in the Hollywood of the 1920s and '30s. Author Christopher Bram uses Whale's scrambled brain to great effect. The director's memory casts around in time: to his hardscrabble English childhood, the trenches of World War I and the sets of his greatest films. Boris Karloff, Elsa Lanchester and George Cukor flit in and out of the narrative. And yard man Boone bears more than a passing resemblance to Frankenstein's monster. The storylines of Whale's life blur together.

Whale and Boone are unlikely companions. The old man finagles meetings over cucumber sandwiches and paintings. The maid thinks she knows why and disapproves. But Whale, fragile and mixed-up though he is, knows how to play a role when it suits.

Narrator Joe Barrett is incredible. He does accents well and makes you feel like you're listening to a full-cast recording.

#WorldWarI #Hollywood #Nostalgic #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

  • Patti Smith at the Minetta Lane

  • Words and Music
  • By: Patti Smith
  • Narrated by: Patti Smith
  • Length: 1 hr and 23 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,156
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,049
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,036

Patti Smith: Words and Music features live audio of performances captured over three evenings at the Minetta Lane Theatre, woven into a single, one-of-a-kind audio event.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A bonus for fans of Just Kids & M Train

  • By tru britty on 11-02-18

A bonus for fans of Just Kids & M Train

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

Patti Smith is a poet, storyteller, songwriter and performer, and all those pieces are woven together in this outstanding Audible experience.

Patti performs some of her best-known songs and provides stories about them culled from her memoirs. She talks about snowy days with Robert Mapplethorpe, a case of mistaken identity with Beat poet Allen Ginsberg, the love of her life, her kids, her music.

She has a great storytelling voice with that touch of mid-Atlantic accent familiar to anyone who has listened to her Just Kids or M Train on Audible.

This is a live performance so when she flubs a line, she goes off-script and engages with the audience. I was listening to this while on a jog and felt like I was in the theater with Patti.

I've heard music copyright is a real pain. So I was surprised Audible was able to include Patti's songs. I hope this means that in future we can expect other programs that use recognizable songs--not just stuff written for a particular audiobook.

#Poetry #Performance #Goddess #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

16 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • Leadership

  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Beau Bridges, David Morse, Jay O. Sanders, and others
  • Length: 18 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 634
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 573
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 568

Are leaders born or made? Where does ambition come from? How does adversity affect the growth of leadership? Does the man make the times or do the times make the man? In Leadership, Goodwin draws upon four of the presidents she has studied most closely - Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson (in civil rights) - to show how they first recognized leadership qualities within themselves, and were recognized by others as leaders.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What makes a president great?

  • By tru britty on 09-25-18

What makes a president great?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-18

The title of Doris Kearns Goodwin's book is Leadership. What she's really examining through the stories of Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, FDR and LBJ is: what makes a president great or how does a president become great?

Goodwin has devoted entire books to each man, which is a definite plus because she knows the material so well she's able to pick and choose events from their lives to illustrate the teaching moments in leadership. (She knew LBJ personally.) Goodwin is also able to craft short narratives of these someday presidents that bring out their struggles, pathos and unique brilliance. The reader meets flesh-and-blood men, not dusty historical figures.

What Goodwin finds is that her presidents are made rather than born. Two were born to hardscrabble families: Lincoln and LBJ. Two were born to privilege: Teddy and FDR. Each one was driven by tremendous ambition but the ambition was ultimately, at least, alloyed to greater purpose.

And each staggered through a time in the wilderness. Lincoln's brief tenure in congress threw him back to Illinois and the law profession. His political career had stalled, and for long years he moved along in relative obscurity, only drawn out by the contested expansion of slavery to frontier states. Teddy lost his wife and mother in a single day. He withdrew to the Dakotas where frenetic activity kept him ahead of all-consuming despair. FDR's fine physique and, he assumed, his presidential hopes were dashed by polio. LBJ lost an important bid for political office, which shadowed his belief in his destiny with agonized doubt.

These men were not alike. They did not possess the same gifts, nor the same faults. And those faults didn't necessarily disappear when they reached the presidency. But they did have a capacity to grow from mistakes and to find mentors and team members who were far from being yes men (or yes women in Eleanor Roosevelt's case).

Goodwin paints pictures of flawed men who nevertheless were able to rise above self-interest and politics as usual to work toward a better, equitable vision of America.

The narrators are beyond excellent. Beau Bridges narrates the LBJ chapters and he's stellar. I don't know if he's narrated an audiobook before, but he should do it again.

#Democracy #USPresident #OvercomingChallenges #tagsgiving #sweepstakes

18 of 18 people found this review helpful

  • How to Survive a Plague

  • The Inside Story of How Citizens and Science Tamed AIDS
  • By: David France
  • Narrated by: Rory O'Malley
  • Length: 24 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 156
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155

A riveting, powerful telling of the story of the grassroots movement of activists, many of them in a life-or-death struggle, who seized upon scientific research to help develop the drugs that turned HIV from a mostly fatal infection to a manageable disease. Ignored by public officials, religious leaders, and the nation at large, and confronted with shame and hatred, this small group of men and women chose to fight for their right to live by educating themselves and demanding to become full partners in the race for effective treatments.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Sad story, beautifully told

  • By Michael on 07-03-17

Gripping history of early AIDS epidemic & ACT UP

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-06-18

David France begins his history of the early years of the AIDS epidemic with the 2013 funeral of Spencer Cox, an activist with ACT UP-New York who was integral in the group's fight to get access to drug trials and drugs and get a too often indifferent government to care about the plight of people living with AIDS.

Cox had survived the death sentence of AIDS when the life-extending drug cocktail became available in 1996, only to lose contact with the friendships he'd formed in ACT UP and his sense of purpose. For some reason, he just decided to stop taking his AIDS medication.

The second chapter goes back to the beginning of the AIDS epidemic in 1981. Just like Randy Shilts's And the Band Played On, How to Survive a Plague follows the epidemic forward through key figures and events in what was at first a mystery disease. Larry Kramer, the Old Testament prophet of the epidemic, plays a large and divisive role in early activism. He's a great character and a real champion with a habit of alienating those he's needs.

Peter Staley also figures a lot. He's the baby-faced Wall Street trader who, to keep his job, stays in the closet until AIDS makes it impossible. Then activism becomes his new mission.

There are a lot of characters in this engrossing story. A lot of them die off. Because before 1996, AIDS was nearly 100 percent fatal. The epidemiology of AIDS reads like a great murder mystery. What is this disease killing young men? Why is it concentrated in the gay community? The medical community was scrambling for answers through a fog of confusion and fear.

David France also tackles the unresponsiveness of the federal government and New York's mayor Ed Koch. The evolution and work of ACT UP becomes the backbone for much of this history because it exemplifies the coalition of people living with AIDS who had to come together and act when no one else would. This book is a great follow-up to And the Band Played On because it covers a longer period of time. Shilts's published his in 1987 and a lot has happened in the HIV/AIDS fight since then, including the debunking of the Gaetan Dugas/Patient Zero myth and the drug cocktail.

The narrator does an excellent job.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Somebody to Love

  • The Life, Death and Legacy of Freddie Mercury
  • By: Matt Richards, Mark Langthorne
  • Narrated by: Tim Bruce
  • Length: 15 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 163

When Freddie Mercury died in 1991, aged just 45, the world was rocked by the vibrant and flamboyant star's tragic secret that he had been battling AIDS. That Mercury had even been diagnosed came as a shock to his millions of fans, with his announcement coming less than 24 hours before his death. In Somebody to Love, biographers Mark Langthorne and Matt Richards skilfully weave Freddie Mercury's incredible pursuit of musical greatness with Queen, his upbringing and his endless search for love with the story of a terrible disease.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Worthwhile, a wee bit heavy on AIDS history

  • By Garry S. Garrett on 11-28-18

Stunning dual biography of Freddie and AIDS

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-18

Freddie Mercury's history has become inextricably linked with the AIDS epidemic, but he was so much more than that. It's his music that has become his legacy. His performance at 1985's Live Aid was merely the crowning glory of this charismatic performer.

Still, authors Matt Richards and Matt Langthorne made the decision to tell Freddie's story at the same time they unfolded the story of AIDS, which from the most recent evidence seems to have passed from chimp to human via an animal bite sometime around 1908 in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Both stories are fascinating in the extreme. But it's Freddie's that takes up the largest chunk of the story, as the authors follow him from his birth in Zanzibar to Indian parents of Persian descent. There's the Indian boarding school, the move to London, the art school and the first band. (You can find an unearthed home movie of Freddie with his college pals on YouTube. What's amazing is how reserved and camera shy he is.)

The story gets into Queen territory when Freddie becomes a dedicated follower of Jimi Hendrix and a local London group called Smile, with Brian May on guitar, Roger Taylor on drums, some guy on bass (eventually to be John Deacon) and a lead singer, whom Freddie would eventually replace, rechristening the band Queen.

The chapters are a good mesh of band and music history along with glimpses of Freddie's personal life. Freddie dated girls, and had one long-term girlfriend (Mary Austin) in particular. But he seemed to begin identifying almost exclusively as a gay man in the mid-70s. That brought him into contact with the gay scene in New York, where AIDS was already making inroads, though no one knew it because the retrovirus has an incubation period of up to 10 years.

The authors try to pin down Freddie's infection to 1981 or 1982 and cite a Saturday Night Live performance in 1982, when Freddie was battling a throat condition, a possible indicator a person has been infected, showing up within weeks of the original infection though the virus otherwise remains dormant.

There is information about Freddie's boyfriends (including his last Jim Hutton), the Live Aid performance, the leaking of Freddie's HIV test to the British tabloid press, the last concert tour in 1986, Freddie living with full-blown AIDS (with the press hounding him for a confession), Freddie throwing himself into studio work, his final recordings and music videos with Queen, his death in November 1991, and the Freddie tribute concert organized by May and Taylor.

Narrator Tim Bruce does an excellent job. His voice is well-suited to the story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Indianapolis

  • By: Lynn Vincent, Sara Vladic
  • Narrated by: John Bedford Lloyd
  • Length: 18 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 339
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 326
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 321

 

The USS Indianapolis was the key ship in the largest and most powerful fleet to ever sail the face of the earth - or that will ever sail again. Her crew led the fleet from Pearl Harbor to the islands of Japan, notching an unbroken string of victories in an uncharted theater of war. When the time came for President Harry S. Truman to deal Japan the decisive blow, Indianapolis answered the call, and a super-spy named Major Robert S. Furman climbed aboard with the components of the world’s first atomic bomb.  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As good as In Harm's Way but different

  • By tru britty on 07-13-18

As good as In Harm's Way but different

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-13-18

Doug Stanton's history of the USS Indianapolis, In Harm's Way, is one of my favorite Audible reads.

So I was wondering if I should buy Sara Vladic and Lynn Vincent's Indianapolis. What else could there be to tell? And who could tell it better than Stanton?

This book is just as good as Stanton's but different. Whereas Stanton's has a tight focus on the sinking of the Indianapolis and the ordeal the surviving men suffered at the mercy of the ocean, the sun, thirst, injuries, sharks and each other, this new book takes a longer view of the ship's history, from Iwo Jima, Okinawa, the Top Secret mission and disaster to the 2005 Senate hearing to exonerate Captain McVay and the 2017 discovery of the wreckage by Paul Allen.

Because this new book covers so much territory and so many players, including the Japanese sub commander who gave the order to sink the cruiser, the story moves more slowly than Stanton's. But it's an absorbing experience. It almost felt like three books wrapped into one.

There's the story of the USS Indianapolis as Germany fails and the Pacific War heats up. The ship played roles at Iwo and Okinawa, where it suffered damage.

Then there's the Top Secret mission to deliver a mysterious crate to Tinian. It's after this delivery that the cruiser is torpedoed and the men are flung into a midnight ocean thick with expelled ship oil. They get separated into far-flung groups that are for the most part unaware of each other because of the ten-foot waves that wall off their view. Then they linger in the ocean for four days without water and little to no food--and sharks.

The last story is a court drama as a victorious Navy, riding high after the fall of Japan, tries to cover up the greatest disaster in its history by laying the full blame on Captain McVay. The story picks up again decades later as the survivors try to clear their captain's name with the help of an adolescent boy.

I really loved the appendix where author Sara Vladic talks about how she got interested in the ship and then spent 17 years getting to know the survivors and interviewing them and writing their story.

The narrator John Bedford Lloyd does a fine job but I increased the playback speed to 1.5 and occasionally to 2 because he spoke too slowly for me.

21 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Burnt Offerings

  • Valancourt 20th Century Classics
  • By: Robert Marasco
  • Narrated by: R.C. Bray
  • Length: 7 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,803
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,687
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,685

Ben and Marian Rolfe are desperate to escape a stifling summer in their tiny Brooklyn apartment, so when they get the chance to rent a mansion in upstate New York for the entire summer for only $900, it's an offer that's too good to refuse. There's only one catch: behind a strange and intricately carved door in a distant wing of the house lives elderly Mrs. Allardyce, and the Rolfes will be responsible for preparing her meals. But Mrs. Allardyce never seems to emerge from her room, and it soon becomes clear that something weird and terrifying is happening in the house.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Haunted house story more creepy than horrific

  • By Calliope on 05-03-17

A favorite haunted house read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-14-18

This is one of my favorite haunted house books. I discovered it, like a lot of people, through the movie, which starred Oliver Reed, Karen Black, Burgess Meredith and Bette Davis.

Unlike the film, the book has a long, slow opening. There's a lot of stuff about the couple and their son and aunt, the state of the couple's relationship, where they live and why they want to get away for the summer. The film was wise to skip all this and cut right to the moment the couple drives up to the old mansion available for rent.

They meet the creepily friendly brother-and-sister owners and feel the magic (at least the wife does) of this spectacular wreck. The wife can already imagine them there. The husband has reservations.

So, like Stephen King's The Shining, the story is not just about supernatural horror but about the antagonisms of family relationships.

If you like this, you might also be interested in:

The Shining by Stephen King
Hell House by Richard Matheson
Kill Creek by Scott Thomas

(nonfiction) Paperbacks from Hell: The Twisted History of '70s and '80s Horror Fiction by Grady Hendrix.

  • Beatles '66

  • The Revolutionary Year
  • By: Steve Turner
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 12 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 50
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 47
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 48

The year that changed everything for the Beatles was 1966 - the year of their last concert and of Revolver, their first album created to be listened to rather than performed. This was the year the Beatles risked their popularity by retiring from live performances, recording songs that explored alternative states of consciousness, experimenting with avant-garde ideas, and speaking their minds on issues of politics, war, and religion. Music journalist and Beatles expert Steve Turner investigates the enormous changes that took place in the Beatles' lives and work during 1966.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great listen

  • By Tad Davis on 07-28-18

New information on a pivotal year in Beatles music

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-29-18

Steve Turner has accomplished a feat. He has written a book about the most documented music group in history and still come up with fresh information and interpretations.

Turner does this by narrowing his focus to 1966. The Beatles were coming off Rubber Soul, where John was trying out a new style of Dylan lyric writing (Norwegian Wood) and the Beatles were getting more experimental in the studio.

This was the year the Beatles put together what some consider their best album, Revolver.

The book examines the Beatles' decision to stop touring and focus on recording. So there's a lot about John's Jesus remarks and the subsequent Beatles record burnings in the American South. The bloom was off the lovable Mop Tops and the s@#$ was hitting the fan.

There's a recounting of the group's tour dates in Japan--where they were criticized for appearing at the Budokan--and the comic misunderstanding in the Philippines that led to a potentially dangerous feud between the group and Imelda Marcos.

Beatles '66 obviously looks at the recording of Revolver and how the songs represent an evolution in their songwriting and studio process.

Simon Vance does an excellent job as narrator, getting down the different speech patterns of John, Paul, George and Ringo. He doesn't try to imitate but you always know which Beatle is speaking.


Other Audible titles you might enjoy:

Maximum Volume: The Life of Beatles Producer George Martin: The Early Years, 1926-1966 by Kenneth Womack. My one gripe with this book is the American narrator. Who made that decision?


Altamont: The Rolling Stones, the Hells Angels, and the Inside Story of Rock's Darkest Day by Joel Selvin. Like Beatles '66, this music history has a narrow focus, the infamous Altamont concert headlined by the Rolling Stones. The book tells the story from the point of view of audience members, music critics who were there, performers, the Hell's Angels and the young man who was killed and his girlfriend.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The True History of the Elephant Man

  • The Definitive Account of the Tragic and Extraordinary Life of Joseph Carey Merrick
  • By: Michael Howell, Peter Ford
  • Narrated by: Steve West
  • Length: 8 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 25
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 25

Due to horrible physical deformities, he spent much of his life as a fairground freak. He was hounded, persecuted, and starving, until his fortune changed and he was rescued, housed, and fed by the distinguished surgeon, Frederick Treves. The subject of several books, a Broadway hit, and a film, Joseph Merrick has become part of popular mythology. Here, in this fully revised edition containing much fresh information, are the true and un-romanticized facts of his life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing man!

  • By Carolyn on 02-05-15

Starts slowly but really pays off

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-18

I had a hard time getting into this book, even though I was interested in the subject and I had just seen the David Lynch film.

But the story really picked up, for me, around (audio) chapter 7, when the Elephant Man, Joseph (sometimes called John) Merrick hires himself out to the freak shows of 19th-century London. That's when he meets the doctor who will be so important to the last years of his life--though neither knows it at the time.

This is a grim story. It's one of those stories about the cruelty and indifference suffered by a man crippled by physical abnormalities in a world with few safety nets. However, Merrick never relinquishes his humanity and his capacity for enjoyment in the simple things. This is captured beautifully in the Lynch film.

The grimness is alleviated in the second half of the book when Merrick finds a home in the London Hospital, under the care of Frederick Treves. Merrick even enjoys some fame and the friendship of elegant persons. This period is livelier and more poignant because it was better documented. In fact, Treves later wrote his reminiscences in an article, which is included at the end of the audiobook.


Other Audible titles you might want to check out:

The Knife Man: The Extraordinary Life and Times of John Hunter, Father of Modern Surgery by Wendy Moore -

This book's story begins some few decades before Merrick's own but also explores early medical history. John Hunter was a pioneer surgeon who would go to great and sometimes dubious lengths to acquire human and animal specimens. He even stalked a dying freak show tall man, Charles Byrne, because he wanted to dissect his body. Hunter was an inspiration for Mary Shelley's Dr. Frankenstein.


Spectacle: The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga by Pamela Newkirk -

Ota Benga was a Congolese pygmy who ended up becoming a caged attraction at the New York Zoological Gardens.

  • Agatha Christie

  • A Mysterious Life
  • By: Laura Thompson
  • Narrated by: Pearl Hewitt
  • Length: 20 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 18
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18

It has been one hundred years since Agatha Christie wrote her first novel and created the formidable Hercule Poirot. A brilliant and award-winning biographer, Laura Thompson now turns her sharp eye to Agatha Christie. Arguably the greatest crime writer in the world, Christie’s books still sell over four million copies each year - more than thirty years after her death - and it shows no signs of slowing. But who was the woman behind these mystifying, yet eternally pleasing, puzzlers?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Your Little Grey Cells will love this

  • By tru britty on 03-28-18

Your Little Grey Cells will love this

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-28-18

I tore through this excellent biography about the Queen of Mystery in days.

I enjoy Christie as an author but I wasn't sure how much her life would engage me, even with that mysterious disappearance and her expeditions to far-flung points of the globe with a much younger second husband, who was an archaeologist.

Biographer Laura Thompson had me hooked from the very beginning, even during that childhood phase when many bios seem to lapse into dull genealogies of great grandparents and grandparents and snooze.

The author also doesn't make you wait till Agatha becomes a published author to start talking about her books. Thompson weaves in quotes and references from the start, because Christie's life was, of course, material for her books. Also, Christie was tight-lipped about her personal life. Evidence from books helps to give voice to the silent spaces in the mystery writer's life.

There are no long analyses of books. But certain titles, like The Murder of Roger Ackroyd, get extra attention. The biggest chunk of the book is devoted to Agatha Christie's disappearance in 1926 and her divorce from husband no. 1.


Other Audible titles you might want to check out:

The Golden Age of Murder by Martin Edwards - A history of the writer's group, the Detection Club, to which Agatha Christie and Dorothy L. Sayers were members. Very good except for the footnotes read at the close of each chapter.

The Art of the English Murder: From Jack the Ripper and Sherlock Holmes to Agatha Christie and Alfred Hitchcock by Lucy Worsley - The author examines famous true crime cases from 19th and 20th-century England and their influence on mystery writers like Christie.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful