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LTCKEL

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  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 8
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  • 61 Hours

  • A Jack Reacher Novel
  • By: Lee Child
  • Narrated by: Dick Hill
  • Length: 13 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,900
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,408
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,404

A tour bus crashes in a savage snowstorm and lands Jack Reacher in the middle of a deadly confrontation. In nearby Bolton, South Dakota, one brave woman is standing up for justice in a small town threatened by sinister forces. If she's going to live long enough to testify, she'll need help. Because a killer is coming to Bolton, a coldly proficient assassin who never misses.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Cliffhanger was disappointing

  • By JV on 05-28-10

Disappointing end

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-20-14

Would you consider the audio edition of 61 Hours to be better than the print version?

I use audio rather than print versions because I had cataract surgery that makes reading difficult. You can't compare print and audio versions.

If you’ve listened to books by Lee Child before, how does this one compare?

This a better effort by Lee Childs than the first three I read. That said, the author leaves you hanging at then end. I despise an author's use of suspense, no-real-conclusion, tactics to sell follow-on novels.

Have you listened to any of Dick Hill’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Yes, he's as good as any reader I've listened to.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

The murder of the old lady.

Any additional comments?

Lee Childs uses badly described sex as drawing cards in some of his novels. That's what caused me to stop reading his novels. This story, aside from a budding phone romance, doesn't use sex as a draw. I'm glad.

  • Up Country

  • By: Nelson DeMille
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 28 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,766
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,525
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,520

In the latest from Nelson DeMille (author of The Lion's Game), Paul Brenner is called out of CID retirement to investigate the murder 30 years ago of an army lieutenant in Vietnam. Brenner's trip up country, with a beautiful American expatriate for company, will lead him to uncover an explosive, long-buried secret.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By Graham S. Stafford on 08-26-08

Vietnam and humanity in one long drink

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-14

What did you love best about Up Country?

I spent 1968 - 69 in Vietnam as an Army Medical Service Corps Officer and served throughout some of the same areas he describes and visits in the novel. As such, I enjoyed the creative update his story provided regarding things that both have and haven't changed since I was there. But, more than that, I enjoyed his "sense of the past," his treatment of war memories and their significance, and his maintenance of an unchanging and unyielding attitude throughout the story.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

There were things I both did and didn't expect that added to the nature of the adventure. The degree to which the police were able to keep track of of both characters was a little extreme but added to the suspense. As such, the killings of both the policemen and soldiers seemed somewhat impractical. Still, it was a story!

What does Scott Brick bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Scott Brick's interpretation was flawless as always. I enjoy his reading style so much that I've gone out of my way from time to time to select books, not because of the author or story, but because of Scott's style.

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

No. As I do with all Vietnam war-based and related novels, I probably spend too much time looking for inaccuracies in the writer's descriptions of what happened militarily than I do paying attention to the story line per se. That said, I was interestingly satisfied by the police and soldier killings I mentioned earlier. For some unknown reason, it seemed to appeal to an errant sense of justice I've maintained over the years!

Any additional comments?

Ordinarily, I enjoy the put and take between men and women in all novels. It adds dimension, humanity and realism to to a story. What I don't particularly care for is gratuitous sex and the insertion of libido into a story that could easily stand alone without it. This novel begins slowly as the author goes about the business of establishing just such a relationship and that alone almost caused me to discontinue reading. Everything else, the descriptions, thoughts, actions, etc. were fine and I enjoyed listening and imagining being there as much as I suspect the author did reminiscing.

  • Tortilla Flat

  • By: John Steinbeck
  • Narrated by: John McDonough
  • Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 432
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 374
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 381

Adopting the structure and themes of the Arthurian legend, Steinbeck created a Camelot on a shabby hillside above the town of Monterey, California, and peopled it with a colorful band of knights. At the center of the tale is Danny, whose house, like Arthur’s castle, becomes a gathering place for men looking for adventure, camaraderie, and a sense of belonging—men who fiercely resist the corrupting tide of honest toil and civil rectitude.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Good Book

  • By LTCKEL on 09-06-14

A Good Book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-14

If you could sum up Tortilla Flat in three words, what would they be?

A continuation of life in Monterey albeit at a later time - post war era - and in a different venue from Cannery Row. A study in assumptions, ethnicity, allegiance, dependency and fate .... not necessarily in that order ... with a little mystery thrown in for good measure.

Who was your favorite character and why?

I liked the Pirate. I had no difficulty at all imagining his collection of dogs, his style of life that wasn't terribly different from theirs, and his unassuming nature and gratitude for the little he had.

Which character – as performed by John McDonough – was your favorite?

I suspect most readers would select either Pilon or Danny but, I enjoyed the humanity reflected in Big Joe Portugee more. Simple and direct in his thought process, sometimes entirely logical and others entirely illogical in his approach to solving many of life's problems, he reminded me of a gentle giant, someone easy to like and yet, not quite.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

I think it might have been when Danny's second house burned to the ground and Pilon and the group decided to move in with Danny in his first house. The sheer audacity of their thought process reminded me of too many times when I've seen kindness taken complete and total advantage of.

Any additional comments?

I liked the book but not as much as Cannery Row or Sweet Thursday. It just seemed to lack a definitive story line I could look forward to following. Perhaps if I'd listened while sipping on wine .... hmmm ... yes, that would have done it!

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Cannery Row

  • By: John Steinbeck
  • Narrated by: Jerry Farden
  • Length: 5 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,583
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,390
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,384

Published in 1945, Cannery Row focuses on the acceptance of life as it is: both the exuberance of community and the loneliness of the individual. Drawing on his memories of the real inhabitants of Monterey, California, Steinbeck interweaves the stories of Doc, Henri, Mack and his boys, and the other characters in this world where only the fittest survive, to create a novel that is at once one of his most humorous and most poignant works.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Five stars with a Caveat

  • By Bette on 04-23-12

Fun, interesting, enticing reading

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-28-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

I read "Of Mice and Men" in college but skipped Steibeck's other books in favor of books by Ian Fleming. Yep, James Bond was all the rage in the mid-60's. I shouldn't have changed paths. Steinbecks's ability to capture the raw essence of the human experience is pure genius and Cannery Row may be the most profound and reflective of his efforts. This book was a pure joy to listen to. So much so, that I've already begun listening a second time.

What about Jerry Farden’s performance did you like?

He put "character" into his oral interpretation of Steinbeck's work. Well done, Jerry!

1 of 2 people found this review helpful