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Greatnocturn

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  • reviews
  • 0
  • helpful votes
  • 6
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  • Christmas Eve, 1914

  • By: Charles Olivier
  • Narrated by: Cameron Daddo, Xander Berkeley, Cody Fern, and others
  • Length: 1 hr and 13 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 10,651
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,769
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9,731

In 1914, the war which was to have been wrapped up by Christmas had - in reality - only just begun, as all sides entrenched themselves deeper into the Great War. Christmas Eve, 1914 follows one company of British officers as they rotate forward to spend their Christmas on the front lines, a mere 80 yards from the German guns. Upper- and working-class men and boys are thrown together into one trench and struggle to survive.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautifully "illustrated"

  • By anonymous on 12-25-14

One of the best Christmas stories of all time!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-15-18

True or overexagetation; it's still one of the best xmas stories ever told and WW1 stories ever told.

  • The Stand

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 47 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,369
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,311
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,309

This is the way the world ends: with a nanosecond of computer error in a Defense Department laboratory and a million casual contacts that form the links in a chain letter of death. And here is the bleak new world of the day after: a world stripped of its institutions and emptied of 99 percent of its people. A world in which a handful of panicky survivors choose sides - or are chosen.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth the credit

  • By Hunter on 03-27-12

King's best work told by your old school teacher.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-18

The stand is one of the best post-ap books out there. Modern and discriptive. 40 hours might seem insane but Grover Gardner does a great job with narration and characterization for someone who doesn't sound like much of a one man preformer he does a FINE job! Get this will keep you set for a long while!

  • Furry Nation: The True Story of America's Most Misunderstood Subculture

  • By: Joe Strike
  • Narrated by: Eric Heister
  • Length: 7 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16

Furry fandom is a recent phenomenon, but anthropomorphism is an instinct hard-wired into the human mind: the desire to see animals on a more equal footing with people. It’s existed since the beginning of time in prehistoric cave paintings, ancient gods, and tribal rituals. It lives on today - not just in the sports mascots and cartoon characters we see everywhere, but in stage plays, art galleries, serious literature, performance art, and among furry fans who bring their make-believe characters to life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Living the furry life

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-20-18

A grey muzzle's history lesson.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-18

Without a doubt the best put together book regarding the furry fandom. Awesome and comprehensive ranging from early bootlegs of kimba all the way to zootopia. The narrator is very green and made some mistakes but not bad.

  • A River in Darkness

  • One Man's Escape from North Korea
  • By: Masaji Ishikawa, Risa Kobayashi - translator, Martin Brown - translator
  • Narrated by: Brian Nishii
  • Length: 5 hrs and 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,758
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,507
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,505

Half-Korean, half-Japanese, Masaji Ishikawa has spent his whole life feeling like a man without a country. This feeling only deepened when his family moved from Japan to North Korea when Ishikawa was just 13 years old. His father, himself a Korean national, was lured to the new Communist country by false promises of abundant work and a higher station in society. In this memoir translated from the original Japanese, Ishikawa candidly recounts his tumultuous upbringing and the brutal 36 years he spent living under a crushing totalitarian regime.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Heartbreaking

  • By C. F. Gagnon on 05-31-18

30 years of hell

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-19-18

Starvation, death, survival in a regime built on propaganda and fear. A must listen for anyone wanting to know the true effects of a "people's nation".