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Julie Campbell

  • 16
  • reviews
  • 45
  • helpful votes
  • 366
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WTH?!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-11-19

If you are looking for a decent mystery, you're at the wrong place. If you are looking for a cross between a bodice ripper and a soap opera, with a side of satanism, you're in the right place. Being totally honest, I did not finish it. I. Could. Not. Finish. It. Take one impossibly handsome cop (who is also a bully and a dick), and throw in one impossibly beautiful civilian (who has no business being in the story at all), and well, you can see where that's going.... If I had gotten this in paperback, I would have thrown it against the wall.

No. Just, no.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-25-19

Interviewing everyone who was ever in the same building with a murderer and then stringing together 5000 anecdotes does not constitute writing a book. The only time I heard the author attempt to be creative (full confession - I couldn't make it to the halfway point) he has a victim shouting, as the killer is stabbing her, "Not my heart. Not my heart".

Murder and the British Raj

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-16

Sam Wyndham, veteran of WWI and former inspector with Scotland Yard, has been persuaded to move to Calcutta and work with the police there.  He is still trying to find is footing in this strange new country when a white high-placed government employee is found murdered outside an Indian whorehouse.

This would have been an excellent mystery anyway, but I believe it is even more so because the author is a Brit from an Indian heritage who is able to give the reader insight into thinking and attitudes of both the British Raj and the Indians. 

Simon Bubb is now of of my favorite readers, able to both distinguish the characters, and accurately handle multiple accents.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Are you kidding me?!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-13

The writing is actually quite good in this debut. I'm not a fan of murder mysteries that spend an inordinate amount of time in serial killers heads but I could have forgiven that. What I can't forgive is advancing the plot by having the detective make "intuitive leaps" based on nothing. If I hadn't been listening to this on my iPod, I would have thrown it against the wall.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

SPQR II audiobook cover art

The Beginning of the End of the Republic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-14-13

If this had been written as an historical novel I would have rated it four stars. The history, the anthropology were great. But it was sadly lacking in mystery. Still, I enjoy the writing enough to go on to book three in the series.

Excellent!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-12

Three years ago two 15 year old girls vanished. There is a police investigation but they are thought to have run away to London. Until the body of one of the girls is found after a blizzard, barefoot and sexually mutilated. Joe O'Loughlin is asked to review the original investigation in light of the girls obviously not having run away. Told by both Joe, and Piper Hadley, the surviving teen, Robotham writes yet another perfect suspense-filled mystery.

And, as always, Sean Barrett is the perfect narrator.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Kevin Kearney and George Guidall = a perfect match

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-12

This is a series that I haven't read in order so I've gone back to read the ones I've missed.
This entry has two simultaneous but unrelated storylines. In one, Kearney is trying to
find out who killed a small-town cop, and in the other he's working to solve the theft of
priceless art works from the governor's office. It took me half the book to keep straight
which characters belonged to which storyline but that was more "operator error" than
a problem with the writing.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

One of my top ten reads for the year.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-25-12

I don't care for legal mysteries but this will make my top ten reads of the year. More than half the book is about Guido Guerrieri, the Advocato in the criminal courts. The case he is defending is one of a Senegalese peddler who is accused of kidnapping and strangling a small Italian boy whom he was friends with. The case hangs, not on proving someone else did it, nor even proving the accused did not do it. Instead, in a brilliant piece of writing, Guido offers in his closing argument a monologue on the multiple natures of "truth".

Special kudos to Patrick Creagh, the translator. So perfect is his translation that the reader would never guess the book had been written in Italian.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

Can we get everyone on the same page please?

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-22-08

Other than this being a very long book, I don't understand the reasoning behind splitting the narration between two readers. Even less do I understand why everyone wouldn't sit down beforehand and agree on the pronunciation of all the proper names. Kate Reading makes no attempt to differentiate the voices of the various characters (as does Michael Kramer), which makes her alternate pronunciations all the more jarring. I gave the book three starts simply because I read it in a paper version and enjoyed it. I cannot recommend the audio version at all.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful

Deceit audiobook cover art

My favorite audiobook this year

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-08

Ellen's husband, Harry, goes for a sail in his yacht and never returns, presumed lost at sea. When the boat and body are recovered, more questions are raised than answered. You, as the reader, know Ellen is lying. But about what? What is already a great story is only enhanced by the superb reading of Frances Tomelty.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful