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todd

United States
  • 8
  • reviews
  • 20
  • helpful votes
  • 16
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  • The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1

  • From Washington to Taft
  • By: Larry Schweikart
  • Narrated by: John McLain
  • Length: 10 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

Back by popular demand, the bestselling Politically Incorrect Guides provide an unvarnished, unapologetic overview of the topics every American needs to know. The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Presidents, Part 1 profiles America’s early presidents, from George Washington to William Howard Taft.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A to-the-point and enlightening summary

  • By Jonathan E. on 01-12-17

Not much of a PIG, but I didn't make it far

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-13-18

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

Someone who wants to hear some factoids, but not get a lot of higher level story lines that you may not have known or that may be impactful.

What could Larry Schweikart have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

The flow didn't have all of the items that make other PIG's so engaging. Questions. Obvious paragraph headings. The only "books you're not supposed to read" I made it to somehow felt very much like a nothing burger of a book; I doubt it's controversial of not PC at all, and it wasn't conveyed why I'm not supposed to read it.

Would you be willing to try another one of John McLain’s performances?

It isn't an enthused performance, but I didn't see why it would be.

Any additional comments?

Take the above with a grain of salt because I just gave up in the first hour, and found it hard to concentrate on, so I'm sure I missed plenty. I'll blame the reader in part for not being as animated as others, but if the material is good I can overlook that. I love the PIG series, but they usually sink their teeth into you at the start, and I especially like the ones with the paragraph flows that are shorter with clear side-bars and questions leading the chapters. These things keep you going, not wanting to stop, and looking forward to what's coming. The books you're not supposed to read are usually just that. Did this have these things? Maybe. Some. Again, I may have missed a lot, but all I kept picking up were little factoids that seemed like something he found and wanted to let you know that you didn't know this little thing. I didn't catch one sounding very PI. There were a lot of statements that were simply opinions, and PC opinions at that. OK, maybe you hold that opinion, but tell us why Hamilton is perfect when the PI'ers would have the opposite opinion. How is it PI to say what the PC crowd would? Maybe it is. I didn't get why. Maybe he does say why later. I didn't find it interesting enough from 'go' as most other PIGs. I strongly recommend Thomas Woods US History PIG if you want a true PIG. I would have liked opinions that disputed or at least didn't copy those, which you certainly will find here... they just seemed far too PC and not big enough or connected enough (from what I heard of course!).

  • The City of Mirrors

  • A Novel (Book Three of the Passage Trilogy)
  • By: Justin Cronin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 29 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,208
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6,649
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,638

The Twelve have been destroyed, and the 100-year reign of darkness that descended upon the world has ended. The survivors are stepping outside their walls, determined to build society anew - and daring to dream of a hopeful future.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't wait for the end

  • By Gberdan on 09-14-18

You're going to buy it, so just buy it already!

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-01-16

What did you love best about The City of Mirrors?

Cronin is an amazing talent, and I'm very much looking forward to his future works. That being said, I struggled with this one, and admittedly skipped through much, but I still feel like there was simply a ton of overlap.

Would you be willing to try another book from Justin Cronin? Why or why not?

Of course, can not wait.

Any additional comments?

A comic's comic is that comedian that is placed on a pedestal by his peers, but may not be as well taken by the public.

The visuals of the third book do not disappoint. This will be made into a movie. However, my gut tells me the first 2 movies will do well, the third I'm not so sure of.

Whereas the second book continued the story in an interesting fashion, I felt the third was trying too hard for the same, but also needed to bring things back to the start in a lot of ways.

The length of time between novels has us picking up on these characters we know... but, as the book progresses, it's clear we really do not know them by their actions. I honestly felt let down and like these were strangers. I'm still not quite sure why the central female's role and abilities were diminished from the prior two books... maybe it was explained somewhere, but it seems we'd get more.

The things that worked so well in the last two books, the character interplay, the spiritual aspects... they were inexplicably just dropped. The ending did wrap up every character, but they were largely let downs, either in how they moved on was just bizarre, or the few that were introduced / needed a character angle thrown in for the third book just seemed forced.

Overall pace is just slow. There are parts you are questioning if the author doesn't respect the audience just from how long scenes are played forward.

And on being slow and tired... the theme of all of the characters being tired was tiresome. OK, we get it, they're beat up, have never been more tired... until they are again in a few chapters. And until they do some amazing feat, and they're so much more tired now. Repeat until the end.

I'll share I've probably missed a lot, I listen at night, and have restarted a few times, but you really get what's going on here quickly, unlike the previous two books, and there's a lot that lingers here you want to forward through. The super-baddy we're told is the worst person to have ever lived, and his story beginning to end is a broken overplayed record.

I give it to Cronin, this was a gutsy ending to a great series. I don't fault him for trying, but hope his next book has a little more of the energy we've come to expect.

4 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms

  • A Song of Ice and Fire
  • By: George R. R. Martin
  • Narrated by: Harry Lloyd
  • Length: 10 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,858
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,479
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,411

Taking place nearly a century before the events of A Game of Thrones, A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms compiles the first three official prequel novellas to George R. R. Martin's ongoing masterwork, A Song of Ice and Fire. Before Tyrion Lannister and Podrick Payne, there were Dunk and Egg. A young, naïve, but ultimately courageous hedge knight, Ser Duncan the Tall towers above his rivals - in stature if not experience. Tagging along is his diminutive squire, a boy called Egg - whose true name (hidden from all he and Dunk encounter) is Aegon Targaryen.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Martin is a genius

  • By Celeste Albers on 04-26-16

I'm not even sure of the story

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-15-15

What didn’t you like about Harry Lloyd’s performance?

Listen, it's probably an excellent story.... I've listened to hundreds of audio books, this one's different, here's why:

Ignoring that of course it's an English narrator - why, how could you have a book with knights without an English accent? What in the world sense would that make? - I can't follow the story.

Here's why.

The narrator has NO conception of constant pitch.

I listen to books while working and going to bed. The narrator will go across sentences from whispering to yelling.

I go from can't hearing, to being woken up in a sweat.

The story I'm sure is good. The dozens from Martin I've listened to are excellent.

This reading is terrible. Oh, he's got a great voice, and I'm sure he's probably good with characters. His whispering and yelling is off the charts.

I'd like to suggest for the next reader... you really... really... don't need someone with an accent. Be brave. Be bold. Don't be hack. It's a good story. Get a good narrator first, accent second.

0 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Freedom

  • A Novel
  • By: Jonathan Franzen
  • Narrated by: David LeDoux
  • Length: 24 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 4,703
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,314
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,323

Patty and Walter Berglund were the new pioneers of old St. Paul - the gentrifiers, the hands-on parents, the Whole Foods generation. Patty was the ideal sort of neighbor, who could tell you where to recycle your batteries and how to get the local cops to do their job. She was an enviably perfect mother and the wife of Walter's dreams. Together with Walter - environmental lawyer, commuter cyclist, total family man - she was doing her small part to build a better world.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyable book. Really liked the narration.

  • By R. Spangler on 12-13-10

A millenials iphone, through the eyes of a 50 y/o

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-28-15

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

I'm not sure. 50 y/o men shouldn't try to write for 18 year old girls. They're not interested in this either.

Would you ever listen to anything by Jonathan Franzen again?

No.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

I don't know who could narrate this, so not sure anyone could add. He does the whiney men well; doesn't add to the women.

Any additional comments?

Story weaves all the memes from Dr. Phil and cable news from the last 15 years through the eyes of a disrespectful and whiney teenage boy as told by a Baby Boomer. What's not to like? What's the story? I don't yet know.

  • The Shadow of What Was Lost

  • The Licanius Trilogy, Book 1
  • By: James Islington
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer
  • Length: 25 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 12,941
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,990
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 11,954

It has been 20 years since the end of the war. The dictatorial Augurs, once thought of almost as gods, were overthrown and wiped out during the conflict, their much-feared powers mysteriously failing them. Those who had ruled under them, men and women with a lesser ability known as the Gift, avoided the Augurs' fate only by submitting themselves to the rebellion's Four Tenets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Definitely a standout in the fantasy genre

  • By Amazon Customer on 04-29-15

Tricked again by a Wheel of Time reference

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-19-15

What would have made The Shadow of What Was Lost better?

*** Important note for future reviewers ***Please stop writing this person writes like someone else in your reviews... Yes, I read Robert Jordan because it had the same quote about him as this book did about Tolkien, and otherwise would not have. Looking back it is why I read Jordan. However, if you use that high praise, you need to have the 'bones' that the other author was about. Four things you need to be Robert Jordan:1) Characters with compassion. Characters with attitude. A story not filled with unnecessary dialogue between characters - "consider this young Rabbitt," "yes, I see that now Master Owl" - rather, we see the Characters smacked in the face with a realization. 2) You need to tame your nerdiness. Don't put some new word, definition, whatever, into every sentence and think you are telling a story. Don't create a society that only includes Wizards or Demons. The world needs to be far more interesting. It needs a little humanity, compassion, reality. 3) A story I care about. I sleep to my books. I'll listen for a while, wake up, find a plot point, and listen. This one puts me to sleep. I'll wake up and hear it, and find nothing to latch onto. I have no idea what the story is, who the characters are, etc. 4) A great narrator. Well... this book gets 1/4. However, as much as I loved hearing Michael Kramer's voice and how it pulled me in initially... without the 3 points above, he is wasted. I lose the story with all of the male voices and males who just talk like one another, and the males who need to talk back and forth all of the time. Give me some emotion man, some drive, something different. And give us some women with personalities and their own motivations. Reviewers, please accept Jordan is gone. Please stop making me excited to buy something that does not have any aspect of Jordan. Every time I do I have less for the future Kickstarters to fund the Wheel of Time video game, movie, TV series, etc. You may like this book for other reasons, but it does not remind you of Jordan because some people can do magical things with powers that run out.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism

  • By: Ha-Joon Chang
  • Narrated by: Joe Barrett
  • Length: 8 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 992
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 802
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 795

If you've wondered how we did not see the economic collapse coming, Ha-Joon Chang knows the answer: We didn't ask what they didn't tell us about capitalism. This is a lighthearted book with a serious purpose: to question the assumptions behind the dogma and sheer hype that the dominant school of neoliberal economists-the apostles of the freemarket-have spun since the Age of Reagan.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Interesting but complicated

  • By Christopher Deaton on 05-03-16

Nothing to Say

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-28-13

What would have made 23 Things They Don't Tell You about Capitalism better?

If the author didn't hide behind his understanding of the issue in order to promote his agenda. There are brief snippets that we see the author stating that we do not have capitalism, but rather than addressing that fact he is constantly setting up strawmen in order to push a story. His interpretation of history like his definition of capitalism is questionable, but he never stops to discuss, each section is a sprint in order to get to the point he can shout about how bad free exchange is. Nothing new, interesting, or true here.

8 of 13 people found this review helpful

  • The Gathering Storm

  • Book Twelve of the Wheel of Time
  • By: Robert Jordan, Brandon Sanderson
  • Narrated by: Michael Kramer, Kate Reading
  • Length: 33 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 12,500
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 9,776
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 9,783

Rand al'Thor, the Dragon Reborn, struggles to unite a fractured network of kingdoms and alliances in preparation for the Last Battle. As he attempts to halt the Seanchan encroachment northward - wishing he could form at least a temporary truce with the invaders - his allies watch in terror the shadow that seems to be growing within the heart of the Dragon Reborn himself.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I normally wouldn't, but...

  • By D. Ramirez on 10-28-09

Best one yet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-01-09

Haven't read a fantasy book in years; can't put it down.

  • The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History

  • By: Thomas E. Woods Jr.
  • Narrated by: Barrett Whitener
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 714
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 392
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389

Everything, well, almost everything, you know about American history is wrong because most textbooks and popular history books are written by left-wing academic historians who treat their biases as fact. But fear not; Professor Thomas Woods refutes the popular myths in The Politically Incorrect Guide to American History.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Quotes Over Conjecture

  • By Patrick S. on 06-12-16

Must read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-09

If you are interested in learning what you didn't learn, rather than wanting to read something that simply fits with your belief of history, get this book. If you're not willing to learn where your history textbooks didn't tell the whole story (or any part of the story at all), then don't listen to this book because as you can see it is very bothersome to some that don't want to have their views questioned.

7 of 12 people found this review helpful