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JCorrine

Long Island, NY
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  • 14
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  • Beyond the Shadows

  • Night Angel Trilogy, Book 3
  • By: Brent Weeks
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 22 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,402
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,524
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,556

Logan Gyre is king of Cenaria, a country under siege, with a threadbare army and little hope. He has one chance---a desperate gamble, but one that could destroy his kingdom. In the north, the new Godking has a plan. If it comes to fruition, no one will have the power to stop him. Kylar Stern has no choice. To save his friends---and perhaps his enemies---he must accomplish the impossible: assassinate a goddess.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful and tragic

  • By Mark on 05-14-16

Amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-17-18

Wow this book has all excellent elements: love, war, fighting, friendship, betrayals and magic. There are different characters whose story runs simultaneous to each other at the same time in different regions. It really is a captivating third book like a war soap opera. I love how Weeks pulled it off. The book has depth and far from superficial with one storyline. It has depth and is smartly done. So impressive with this author. The book is provocative, moving, and thrilling. The characters are complicated individuals like how we, living people, are complex. This creative tactic applied to the characters made me sympathize when they failed and cheer when they accomplished their goals. Weeks managed to write a war book with factions fighting while incorporating a love story. Yes, many fictional tales in this genre have war and magic but many don’t have a personal storylines running concurrent to each other and pulling together in the end. The shock factor is awesome too. Don’t bother assuming where Weeks is going chapter to chapter because you’ll fail to uncover the plot. I can’t stress enough how the realistic nature of the characters is endearing and charming. It’s sad at times, the death and losses. Overall the book is fierce. The audible version is awesomely done.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Legends of Ahn

  • King's Dark Tidings, Book 3
  • By: Kel Kade
  • Narrated by: Nick Podehl
  • Length: 16 hrs and 15 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8,117
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 7,631
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,600

Rezkin is an elite warrior who aims to restore order in Ashai after Caydean's attack on the King's Tournament transformed former allies and trading partners into enemies. With no army and only a ragtag group of refugees, Rezkin must wrest control of the kingdom from the mad and powerful usurper, who seems bent on destruction, and this may not be the biggest challenge. If he fails, the kingdom will be ripped apart, and Rezkin will have violated Rule 1 - to protect and honor his friends.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Book 2.5 at best

  • By Croda on 04-11-18

Disappointed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-17

One the book was short. I expected more material after waiting a year, possibly more or less. Disappointed by Rezkin resorting to his former self, the friendless, cold and distant man who left his home ignorant of the world but eventually deduces the meaning of friendship includes protecting friends. Does he care about them? Is he angry at their mistrust? I don’t know. I found book three confusing. Not sure I understand the diversion from warrior future king bracing to fight to claim the throne left to him against the mad king to brokering a deal with an elf, disguised as a tree to eradicate demons. Demons are a threat to men and magical creatures so this elf approaches Rez as he makes his way off the ship to forge documents before the ship of refugees fleeing Ashai docks and finds passage to a new land. I might reread or listen to book two to better understand Rezkin and why book three went in the direction it does. I hoped Rez would seek love with his betrothed but nothing happened. Is she his intended or not? Striker Farson finds the group in their new land and Rez never asks him what happened, what is the truth about why the Strikers attacked Rez trying to kill him after training and raising him. Why did they make him a weapon? Why is Farson against Rez, going so far as to tell Frisha that Rez doesn’t love her. Rez never confronts him. Now Rez is of the opinion that he doesn’t belong in their world. Then where does he belong? The book never explains what this means for Rez and his charges or rather his friends. If he doesn’t belong in their world, why try to take a throne as determined by a father king he never knew. If he’s an outcast, how could he ever be king if he doesn’t embrace his subjects. I’m lost and don’t understand where this is going.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • The Core

  • Demon Cycle, Book 5
  • By: Peter V. Brett
  • Narrated by: Pete Bradbury
  • Length: 29 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,222
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,014
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,009

For time out of mind, bloodthirsty demons have stalked the night, culling the human race to scattered remnants dependent on half-forgotten magics to protect them. Then two heroes arose - men as close as brothers, yet divided by bitter betrayal. Arlen Bales became known as the Warded Man, tattooed head to toe with powerful magic symbols that enable him to fight demons in hand-to-hand combat-and emerge victorious.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Hastily done.

  • By Marshall H on 10-09-17

Didn’t disappoint! Hope it ends here...

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-07-17

The story is brilliant, very touching and powerful.

I love audiobooks but there are times when a story grates my nerves. I’ll admit to a mild annoyance, with the undereducated twang of one group coupled with the desert tribes’ long winded praise of each other. Then it got a bit gross and I’m adding the series to my R.I.P. pile. Let’s keep in mind, this is book five, and there are four previous books with many atrocities. I never read a series with demons that didn’t have “colorful” or down right brutal imagery. The details on the eunuch army with men cut by other men, where all are unwilling victims is not a new particular in a war story. A hermaphrodite baby with FULLY developed genitals? This was new. I still don’t get the purpose of this turn of events except to make readers nauseated.

I hope it ends here because Arlin is a distinctive creation and Brett names the deliverer.

  • Thornbear

  • Champions of the Dawning Dragons, Book 1
  • By: Michael G. Manning
  • Narrated by: Derek Perkins
  • Length: 11 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 969
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 912
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 915

Gram lives in the long shadow cast by his father, the late hero Dorian Thornbear. Struggling to find his place in a world where politics and wizardry appear to have replaced the need for men of might and main, he must make his own mark. Trapped within the seemingly safe confines of Castle Cameron, Gram faces both love and tragedy. His choices will not only define himself but serve to remind others of his family's legacy and the reason only a fool threatens those a Thornbear protects.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent story by an exceptional author

  • By J P Woollard on 02-28-15

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-06-17

I truly enjoyed the story of the next generation, with Matthew, Moira, Gram, and the other characters like Grace, a magically constructed teddy bear who loves romance novels. Moira makes such constructs fusing their bodies with athar.

The only lapse is the She’Har child belonging to Daniel and Lyra (I won’t attempt to write either names since both are insanely confusing and similar) sent to the Illeniels to learn human ways. She was introduced and disappeared. She spoke a few words and the focus went to Gram. I’m sure this is no great loss to the book. One series on the She’Har is enough.

Either way, the next Thornbear is a sweetheart. If you enjoyed the story of Rose and Dorian, you’ll appreciate the books.

  • Forever Soldiers

  • The Tyrus Chronicle, Book 4
  • By: Joshua P. Simon
  • Narrated by: Steven Brand
  • Length: 14 hrs and 10 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 42
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 39
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 39

Months have passed since Tyrus ended a decade of war between Turine and Genesha by destroying the Geneshan's sorcerous artifact. He had hoped that taking his family south would grant him the peace he desired, but even in the Southern Kingdoms, war welcomes him instead. Ava strikes a deal with the Southern Kingdom leaders to protect her brother, taking his place in their fight to protect their lands from invading forces. Having spent her adult life entrenched in battle, Ava doesn't hold any illusions as to what awaits her.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Still a good book, but not the best in the series.

  • By CrazyDaneGos on 03-14-18

Tyrus is one unique man

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-17

So this is the last book of the series. Characters redeem themselves, some die, others live and the war concludes. Tyrus’ outcome is a bit predictable as far as romance is concerned but otherwise nothing else is apparent. Simon has a penchant for cleverly switching up, shifting gears and taking the story in a new direction. Steven Brand’s sexy mature voice is perfect for the series.

  • Winter's King

  • By: Bryce O'Connor
  • Narrated by: Mikael Naramore
  • Length: 22 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 166
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 157

The Monster of Karth has risen once more. Quin Tern of Azbar has met his fate, and his council has borne the price of crossing Raz i'Syul Arro. Now, as the cruel walls of the city fade into the winter storms at his back, Raz rides north, seeking to take the High Priest Talo Brahnt up on an offer he never should have refused. The path Raz has chosen, though, is a bloody one, and before long he and his new companions find themselves pitted against hardships they can neither anticipate nor ignore.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed every minute

  • By Liz C. on 03-02-18

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-17

Love Raz, never thought a creature could have a literary impact as he but it’s true. There is fighting, gruesome details but so much love in the same quantity.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Blacksmith's Son

  • Mageborn, Book 1
  • By: Michael G. Manning
  • Narrated by: Todd McLaren
  • Length: 8 hrs and 44 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,227
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,151
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,146

Mordecai's simple life as the son of a blacksmith is transformed by the discovery of his magical birthright. As he journeys to understand the power within him he is drawn into a dangerous plot to destroy the Duke of Lancaster and undermine the Kingdom of Lothion. Love and treachery combine to embroil him in events he was never prepared to face. What he uncovers will change his understanding of the past, and alter the future of those around him.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • POV jumps from 1st to 3rd

  • By Skipper on 04-04-16

Performance is great, story line lighter

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-29-17

The story is much lighter than “The Mountains Rise: Embers of Illeniel, Book One” and the preceding books. I didn’t check the reading order but this series is written after book three of the Illeniels series.

I’m disappointed that Manning felt readers were due an explanation about the Illeniel series but I digress. After reading such a strong, powerful and respected series, the Blacksmith’s son is light, not particularly clever and young reader appropriate.

The Illeniel series is unlike any story read and I tremendously respect it, despite the sheepish reviews. I’m a wolf with a strong stomach and prefer authors to put out deeply unique works that shock the masses.

I’m a bit disappointed and the story seems basic for Manning, one he can tell in his sleep. That’s the talent he holds but for some reason he held back with the book. Maybe he decided to tame it down. Notoriety is gained by putting out work that people recall even if it has issues that make some uncomfortable.

So we meet a couple, who adopted a young baby left in their care. Morticai is a precocious young man, a good sort with heart. He’s a smart ass. funny at times but is just lame. Yet, he has promise but his attempts at humor are not funny.

He is an Illeniel descendent. Much of what was documented is lost so he is self training himself in the arts and sadly the last of his line. The former Temptest is now a God. I missed a series in between, it seems and probably reading out of order. Not sure.

I gave the story three stars because I don’t understand how Manning, a daring writer who out a dark, controversial and emotional series to publish such a basic predicable story.

  • Golden Fool

  • The Tawny Man Trilogy, Book 2
  • By: Robin Hobb
  • Narrated by: James Langton
  • Length: 26 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,498
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,276
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,271

Prince Dutiful has been rescued from his Piebald kidnappers and the court has resumed its normal rhythms. There FitzChivalry Farseer, gutted by the loss of his wolf bondmate, must take up residence at Buckkeep as a journeyman assassin. Posing as a bodyguard, Fitz becomes the eyes and ears behind the walls, guiding a kingdom straying closer to civil strife each day. Amid a multitude of problems, Fitz must ensure that no one betrays the Prince’s secret - one that could topple the throne.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Nothing like hanging out with Fitz

  • By Chad on 08-30-14

Tugs on the heart of us who love our pets

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-25-17

I love the witted storyline. Animals bonding with their humans, sharing minds and lives made me wish I could better understand my dogs. Sounds crazy but to have our pets mentally communicate say their aches and pain would make life so much easier. I don’t know if Hobb loves animals and if I get the chance to meet her I’ll ask or google the question. This novel continues with the witted and the kingdom. The Queen is committed to bridging the gap between the witted folk and regular towns’ people. The slaughter of the Old Blood is horrendous.

Either way the story is well told. FitzChivalry is an anomaly. He cares and yet his discipline stops him from having the confrontations any person would desire to gain respect and alleviate the pain loved ones endure in his absence, believing him dead.

He is unwaveringly committed to his Farseer duties so he watches from the dark, lives as a commoner and prefers it this way or at least he considers revealing himself to his daughter, Nettle, or Lady Patience who loved him as a son then abandon the ideas despite the support of the Crown. It’s sad but also cowardly.

I don’t understand him but that’s the point. Fitz is sacrifice for his thrown even though he’s the rightful King, bastard or not. Dutiful doesn’t know he’s Fitz and the Queen doesn’t tell her son the entire truth, that Dutiful is a “bastard” too.

I love Fitz but at times he’s a typical stubborn good man you want to slap. He talks without thinking and misjudges those who love him. He’s a mistrustful pain in the rear who has a heart of good. He carries blames that aren’t his burdens.

Grade~A

  • Royal Assassin

  • The Farseer Trilogy, Book 2
  • By: Robin Hobb
  • Narrated by: Paul Boehmer
  • Length: 29 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,427
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,633
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,650

Young Fitz, the illegitimate son of the noble Prince Chivalry, is ignored by all royalty except the devious King Shrewd, who has had him tutored him in the dark arts of the assassin. He has barely survived his first, soul-shattering mission, and when he returns to the court, he is thrown headfirst into the tumult of royal life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Enjoyed it before, loved it now

  • By Amazon Customer on 06-23-10

Fitz is magical

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-02-17

What a true hero, good natured and kind hearted man this Fitz Chivalry. I started the series with the last three books, "The Fitz and the Fool" I believe is the correct order of the names. In these novels, Fitz is retired from the King's service and living as a husband and father. Fitz Chivalry, Beloved (the Fool) nor Night Eyes are newly introduced characters however, I enjoy learning how they came together as a pack. It's all very captivating. I especially love Hobb's reflections on animals including comparisons and distinctions between man and beasts. She writes about animals with dignity and respect.

The story is just intriguing. The details and execution is spot on and so fantastically delicious I can't get enough of it.

Sadly, it deepened my confusion on Hobb's creation of Fitz's daughter Bee, her obnoxious personality and disposition but I'll reserve my opinion of the little cockroach for the reviews I've yet to post on Amazon.

To conclude, I'm glad I read the series early books. I usually always read a series in the proper order, as the author recommends or of course how it's numbered and listed. It worked out well and actually renewed my love of Beloved and Fitz. Fitz is one sexy fictional man.

  • The Skull Throne

  • By: Peter V. Brett
  • Narrated by: Pete Bradbury
  • Length: 25 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,265
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,881
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,874

The Skull Throne of Krasia stands empty. Built from the skulls of fallen generals and demon princes, it is a seat of honor and ancient, powerful magic, keeping the demon corelings at bay. From atop the throne, Ahmann Jardir was meant to conquer the known world, forging its isolated peoples into a unified army to rise up and end the demon war once and for all. But Arlen Bales, the Warded Man, stood against this course, challenging Jardir to a duel he could not in honor refuse.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Hm

  • By MissRed on 04-05-15

amazing

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-19-17

brilliant and brutal, loved the action among the women, their bravery and honorable dispositions, the storyline enthralled me, threw me for a loop with it's unpredictable layout and progression. the good guys fight a vicious fight, there's deceptions you have no clue exists until the time comes for confrontation. story is a masterpiece. pete bradbury is awesome as usual with impeccable acting and narrative skills. he brings a harmony to the story, with his vocal range and development of characters, that one always knows the characters despite the cultural differences due to his variating subtle tone, while controlled stays on cue expressing emotions listeners can feel the story, personal struggles even though its leveled and not dramatic, brett selected the perfect actor and he did the book justice.