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Dusty

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  • Thank You for Being Late

  • An Optimist's Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations
  • By: Thomas L. Friedman
  • Narrated by: Oliver Wyman
  • Length: 19 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,381
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,370

In his most ambitious work to date, Thomas L. Friedman shows that we have entered an age of dizzying acceleration - and explains how to live in it. Due to an exponential increase in computing power, climbers atop Mount Everest enjoy excellent cell phone service, and self-driving cars are taking to the roads. A parallel explosion of economic interdependency has created new riches as well as spiraling debt burdens.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • It really is an optimists guide to scary stuff

  • By Adam Shields on 12-12-16

"Supernova" is not going to happen.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-14-17

The author has decided to rename "The Cloud" (an already awful term) to "The Supernova", and then proceeds to continually use it in a completely wrong context throughout the book. I wanted to like this book, but I had to quit halfway through it.

  • The Age of Em

  • Work, Love, and Life When Robots Rule the Earth
  • By: Robin Hanson
  • Narrated by: Michael Butler Murray
  • Length: 15 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 65
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 65

Robots may one day rule the world, but what is a robot-ruled Earth like? Many think the first truly smart robots will be brain emulations, or ems. Scan a human brain, then run a model with the same connections on a fast computer, and you have a robot brain, but recognizably human. Train an em to do some job and copy it a million times; an army of workers is at your disposal. When they can be made cheaply, within perhaps a century, ems will displace humans in most jobs.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • An analytical book suited as a reference book

  • By Ageel Alassif on 03-30-17

Couldn't finish it

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-17

I couldn't finish it. It felt like it was never going to get to the point. That means a lot coming from me as I'll sit through just about anything.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Digital Fortress

  • By: Dan Brown
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 11 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,960
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,320
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,332

When the NSA's invincible code-breaking machine encounters a mysterious code it cannot break, the agency calls its head cryptographer, Susan Fletcher, a brilliant, beautiful mathematician. What she uncovers sends shock waves through the corridors of power. The NSA is being held hostage, not by guns or bombs, but by a code so complex that if released it would cripple U.S. intelligence.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Meh...

  • By Amy on 06-19-04

Technical accuracy is unbearably poor

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-14-15

The technical accuracy of this book is unbearably poor. I listened all the way to the disappointing end with hopes it was worth it. It wasn't. It's like a bad episode of CSI, but so much longer.