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bob.oneill

warrenville, il
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 41
  • helpful votes
  • 52
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  • A Beautiful, Terrible Thing

  • A Memoir of Marriage and Betrayal
  • By: Jen Waite
  • Narrated by: Jen Waite
  • Length: 6 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 938
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 866
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 860

Before: Jen Waite has met the partner of her dreams. A handsome, loving man who becomes part of her family, evolving into her husband, her best friend, and the father of her infant daughter. After: A disturbing email sparks suspicion, leading to an investigation of who this man really is and what was really happening in their marriage. In alternating Before and After chapters, Waite obsessively analyzes her relationship, trying to find a single moment form the past five years that isn't part of the long con of lies and manipulation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • There are people out there waiting for her...

  • By MaryPat on 08-29-17

Hell Hath No Fury

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-01-17

Ugh. One reviewer called this book a "A master class in suspenseful storytelling...that recounts the lies, betrayals, and infidelity she endured with unrestrained honesty, deft and candor..." To me, this read no differently than any number of high school tales of woe where boy and girl fall in love, coast on love, and then the jilted girl realizes her beau has moved on to his next conquest.

Near as I can tell this woman "endured" a brief marriage that included infidelity. Infidelity, and the lying that naturally comes with it, are hardly textbook signs of psychopathy...and the real failure was building a relationship on the giddy, full-body orgasm that is new love, instead of taking a mature step back and asking some serious questions about shared values.

The author is a victim, because she ignored some very clear warnings: 1. hubby-to-be was an illegal alien. (but it was OK to forge ahead in marriage because he had awesome physical attributes?) 2. hubby-to-be had one failed marriage, and a child. (but the child showed signs of advanced intelligence, so -clearly- the father gets credit for that) 3. hubby-to-be worked in a job that allowed him to hide his naturalization status; he wasn't a career-track sommelier who worked in the food service industry, because he had a passion for customer service and fine wine...he was a bartender who -like most successful bartenders- could flirt well.

This book also portrays what the husband felt as some sort of medical mystery, when it simply sounds like he was overworked, had poor sleep hygiene, all the while facing the reality we all face in real relationships when the fun ends and the real work begins...and finding answers to life's issues on Google is sheer nonsense. Google is simply a web crawler that gathers up all of the internet's existing stuff...and presents it in easy-to-understand web layouts...Google is NOT an all-knowing oracle.

This so-called psychopath was a new dad and husband and yet he still craved the fresh-makeup "new-ness" of Month 1 Love. Immature men will keep seeking that out when they don't know, or were never taught by a responsible father figure, what it means to remain dutiful as you transition from a man in the whirl of chemical love to a man who must forge a meaningful, loving, partnership after the chemical love fades....the chemicals went away and this guy spun out of control...again, he's not a psychopath...he's immature.

I bought this book, because I was hoping to share experiences with an author who endured some serious marital pathology. In my own case, I've got 14 years in a marriage where "gaslighting" is a daily or weekly issue. I married with a vow of "for better or worse"....when the marriage ends (with one of our death's), I will have done my part.

What I got instead was a book with an author who had a preconceived idea of marriage, and when her own marriage fell short of that expectation, there seemingly had to be a serious, medical, reason for the failure...so the ex-husband gets to be a psychopath, while the ex-wife -who hasn't made it as an actress- finally gets the publicity she needs to live in the public eye.

By the way...cheating is wrong...but isn't all cheating wrong? Why was it OK to gloss over the pre-marriage cheating, and yet somehow the post-marriage cheating takes on some new significance??

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • Get the Truth

  • Former CIA Officers Teach You How to Persuade Anyone to Tell All
  • By: Philip Houston, Michael Floyd, Susan Carnicero
  • Narrated by: Jeff Gurner
  • Length: 7 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 191
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 170

Getting someone to tell the truth is an essential skill that very few people possess. In the boardroom, the classroom, or our own homes, every day we interact with others and try to get the truth from them. People are often untruthful out of fear of negative consequences associated with divulging information. But if a person is made to forget the long-term outcomes, he or she can be influenced to disclose sensitive information that's being withheld.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • same thing as spie the lie

  • By RockyRecon on 02-14-16

only read this if you are a polygraph student

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-04-15

this book could be interesting, if it wasnt marketed as a book that will help the reader "get the truth" out of people.

each scenario in this book presupposes one thing: your target is hooked up to a polygraph machine!!!

the approaches outlined in this book require that you, as the person seeking the truth, are able to detect inconsistent patterns in the respondent, then -with that data established- you can work through different rhetorical approaches to elicit favorable responses.

the respondent knows the questioner cant use the polygraph machine to read minds, but the respondent also knows that the questioner will persist if there is misalignment between the polygraph data, nonverbal cues and the provided answers.

try any of these techniques without a polygraph and the person being questioned can just keep the story going...and you will have no way to prove or disprove it.

11 of 16 people found this review helpful

  • A Kim Jong-Il Production

  • The Extraordinary True Story of a Kidnapped Filmmaker, His Star Actress, and a Young Dictator's Rise to Power
  • By: Paul Fischer
  • Narrated by: Stephen Park
  • Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 320
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 278
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 281

Before becoming the world's most notorious dictator, Kim Jong-Il ran North Korea's Ministry for Propaganda and its film studios. Conceiving every movie made, he acted as producer and screenwriter. Despite this control, he was underwhelmed by the available talent and took drastic steps, ordering the kidnapping of Choi Eun-Hee (Madam Choi) - South Korea's most famous actress - and her ex-husband Shin Sang-Ok, the country's most famous filmmaker.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely terrifying

  • By Karen Weisneck on 02-19-15

Read this book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-21-15

Just an amazing book! For those (like me) who have a narrow understanding of Korea, this book is a great introduction to the lives of Choi Eun-Hee and Shin Sang-Ok. But interwoven into the story of "Madam Choi" and her husband are revealing peeks into the DPRK.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Unbroken

  • A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption
  • By: Laura Hillenbrand
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 14 hrs
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 38,904
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 31,758
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 31,835

Why we think it’s a great listen: Seabiscuit was a runaway success, and Hillenbrand’s done it again with another true-life account about beating unbelievable odds. On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared.... 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Indescribable

  • By Janice on 12-01-10

If you EVER think your life is hard...

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-14-13

...then listen to this audiobook

A single man survived more stress, rigor, trauma, in 2.5 years than most families experience in 3 generations.

  • The Immortal Game

  • By: David Shenk
  • Narrated by: John H. Mayer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 75
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 74

Why has one game, alone among the thousands of games invented and played throughout human history, not only survived but thrived within every culture it has touched? What is it about its 32 figurative pieces, moving about its 64 black and white squares according to very simple rules, that has captivated people for nearly 1,500 years? Why has it driven some of its greatest players into paranoia and madness, and yet is hailed as a remarkably powerful intellectual tool?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Patzer's Review

  • By John on 06-26-12

a must-read for all chess lovers

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-15-13

if you love chess, you will love this book. the book's layout weaves together chapters addressing the moves in the casual (e.g., non-tournament) 1851 match between adolf anderssen and lionel kieseritzky (later dubbed "the immortal game") with chapters about the history of chess.

the immortal game's annotations are all over the internet, but to hear the match described in audiobook form brought it to life in a way that dry annotations cannot.

how can you not enjoy a match where someone gives up a bishop *both* rooks AND the queen to earn checkmate against an opponent who has only lost three measly pawns??

ok, ok...you will probably want to have a passing interest in chess before trying this book, but if you do have such an interest, listen in to one of the greatest chess stories out there.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Proof of Heaven

  • A Neurosurgeon's Near-Death Experience and Journey into the Afterlife
  • By: Eben Alexander
  • Narrated by: Eben Alexander
  • Length: 6 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 3,428
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 3,003
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 3,023

On November 10, 2008, Dr. Eben Alexander was driven into coma by a disease so lethal that only 1 in 10,000,000 survive. Seven days later, he awakened with memories of a fantastic odyssey deep into another realm that were more real than this earthly one - memories that included meeting a deceased birth sister he had never known existed. Dr. Alexander deployed all his knowledge as a scientist to find out whether his mind could have played a trick on him. In its shutdown state, there was no way it could have.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Compelling

  • By Kelly on 10-27-12

Great Story, but...

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-03-12

This book is an enjoyable read and I do recommend the story.

This is why I give 2 stars overall: the author is human. Credentialed or not, the author is fallible, and it is still possible the he was dreaming.

I think the reality (for now) is that science doesn't understand the limits and capabilities of the brain. What the doctor's experience tells me is that the brain is capable of pulling dream states from deeper levels within itself.

Dr. Alexander clearly understands the limits of the human neocortex and thoughtfully ruled out why he could not have been dreaming. But, I am still skeptical. Why?

On the one hand, his brain is shut down (coma) and his neocortex is unable to weave together visual/audio experiences.

But on the other hand he can vividly share his story by applying descriptive attributes to that which he experienced during coma.

If the brain did not produce the experiences, then what and how did those experiences get back into the brain so the Dr. could vividly detail them for us?

Dogs and Mice have less intelligence than humans, yet they both have REM sleep cycles. When I see my dog twitching and barking during REM, it's doubtful he is struggling with the meaning of life. He is probably just chasing around a neighborhood cat...but he still dreams.

If his less "evolved" brain can dream, it still seems very possible to me that the human brain can produce dreams at levels more primitive than the neocortex.




9 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Inside Scientology

  • The Story of America's Most Secretive Religion
  • By: Janet Reitman
  • Narrated by: Stephen Hoye
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,941
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,663
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,678

Scientology, created in 1954 by a prolific sci-fi writer named L. Ron Hubbard, claims to be the world's fastest-growing religion, with millions of members around the world and huge financial holdings. Its celebrity believers keep its profile high, and its teams of "volunteer ministers" offer aid at disaster sites such as Haiti and the World Trade Center. But Scientology is also a notably closed faith, harassing journalists and others through litigation and intimidation, even infiltrating the highest levels of government to further its goals.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • My cup of tea.

  • By Matt on 08-09-11

Disappointing

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-31-11

I want to preface my review by saying that I am not at all affiliated with Scientology. That said, I think this is a OK book, but written in a way to perpetuate existing perceptions of Scientology as a "freak" religion. I would have appreciated a more balanced treatment.

In its beginning, the Catholic faith was riddled with corrupt chuch officials (leading to an offshoot religion called Protestantism); in addition, the church embraced violence early in its formative years as a legitimate tool for establishing/maintaining power. And let's not forget the unchecked abuses of church priests during the 50s, 60s, and (maybe) 70s.

Christianity has had 2000 years to sort itself out (and it's still not perfect). How will Scientology look in 1000 years...in 2000 years?

Why didnt the author spend equal time showing us how people have benefited from Scientology?
I'm only familiar with the so-called famous "parishoners" (e.g. Tom Cruise, John Travolta, etc)...but these folks are successful people, and they claim that Scientology helped them.

Surely there are others out there who are not famous and who have also benefited, no?

The early failures within Scientology's organization are the failures of people who, not ideas or beliefs.
It sounds like Scientology's biggest issue is making sure its leaders behave responsibly.

It would have been nice to hear a balanced history of this organization and its beliefs.

10 of 68 people found this review helpful