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William

Kennesaw, GA, United States
  • 30
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  • 21
  • helpful votes
  • 110
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Thought provoking and engaging, but flawed ending

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-17-19

This book had some stunningly engaging portions. The audio was well put together, the cases made in the various chapters were compelling, the narration was moving and impressive, but ultimately the book ended up feeling like a collection of loosely connected essays rather than a single cohesive narrative to make a case about something. I think the book's inability to stick the ending - to make the case that all these chapters are connected - made the whole book *slightly* less effective because I found myself trying to do the work myself to tie it up neatly. It can't be done because there isn't a single theme that ties the contents - or if there is such a theme, it isn't "talking with strangers." Or maybe it's just that the title seems too trite for such heavy content. Suicide, Terrorism, Police Malfeasance, Spies - these are heavy things to talk about and Gladwell expertly guides us through the minefields showing us the dangerous places. But in the end the horrors don't tell a single tale. That tiny issue bothered me because if you removed that conceipt, the book would (IMHO) be better.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

Interesting and Scary - but with caveats.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-02-19

This is an interesting and scary story that reminds me of DEVIL IN THE WHITE CITY, only instead of hopping between a serial killer and the Columbia Exposition, this hops between the authors struggles with chronic Lyme symptoms and a scientists mysterious bio-weapon research after WWII. The only problem is, as non-fiction, I think the story makes a bold case that the current Lyme symptoms might be brought on by poor experimental control with live tick-releases. I suspect that the average casual listener will find this very compelling but key questions about the premise are not addressed. For example, do ticks make good disease distribution vectors? Don't confuse the availability heuristic with high efficacy. And it seems to be implying that the Lyme disease outbreaks were first observed after these experiments - but that's not true either. My concern isn't that the material in the book is *wrong* so much as that in an effort to make it an interesting story, the author has inadvertently made a misleading story.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

when magic meets maker

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-15-18

An interesting overview of the history of tech as it relates to the paranormal. Brief but thorough within the devices included.

Dr. No audiobook cover art

classic Bond

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-18

The books are grittier and more plausible than the films. Bond faces off against the naughty Dr. No, whose avarice is surpassed only by his cruelty. The book has racism, misogony, sexism and adventure. Romanticises Colonialism and British exceptionalism. Also a good bit of drinking, drug use and torture. The wildlife doesnt fare well either.

Despite all that, still enjoy these books a lot and Dr. No is an exemplar of the series.

so glad unabridged version completed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-18

I loved the original abridged version but couldn't understand why they didn't do the whole text in this amazing format. now they have and all is well with the world. except for what isn't.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

some of the most fun I've had listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-18

great story, fun plot and delightful twists with lots of laugh out loud moments. I'm ready for the sequel already.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Painfully dull and implausible but...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-03-18

This was a slog. I usually enjoy these old saucer books but this is one of the foundational texts of MIB lore. They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers by Gray Barker is a better written and more engaging narrative. I suspect it's Barkers more speculative and popular book guessing at the MIBs than Benders explicitly "contactee" style story which captured imaginations of the time. Still, better to have it on Audible than to have to trudge through this thing by force of will.

classic but maybe not for modern audiences

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-14-18

it's easy to see how influential this series is on things like Star Wars, Star Trek, Green Lantern and more... but something just didn't quite grab me. yet i enjoyed it. not sure I'll continue to book 3. tbd.

Member Bonus audiobook cover art

a powerful narrative delivered by a powerful Dick.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

Dick Cavett tells Gene Shepherd's timeless Christmas story. you'll laugh. you'll have your heart warmed. you'll not regret it.

A nexus of weird

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-25-18

I suspect RAWs writing will infuriate some readers as he hops between being a skeptic, a heirophant, a seeker and a finder, a trickster and a supplicant for enlightenment. A mad collection of counter-culture icons appear and disappear, beliefs are sampled from an AYCE buffet. Is it nourishment? Dunno, but RAW was certainly full of it whatever it was.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful