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Steven

Columbus, Ohio, United States
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  • The Bully Pulpit

  • Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and the Golden Age of Journalism
  • By: Doris Kearns Goodwin
  • Narrated by: Edward Herrmann
  • Length: 36 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,682
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,432
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,427

Goodwin describes the broken friendship between Teddy Roosevelt and his chosen successor, William Howard Taft. With the help of the "muckraking" press, Roosevelt had wielded the Bully Pulpit to challenge and triumph over abusive monopolies, political bosses, and corrupting money brokers. Roosevelt led a revolution that he bequeathed to Taft only to see it compromised as Taft surrendered to money men and big business. The rupture led Roosevelt to run against Taft for president, an ultimately futile race that gave power away to the Democrats.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Makes You Forget You Live in the 21st Century Good

  • By Cynthia on 01-11-14

Juxtaposing the lives of two interesting men

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-21-15

Not the best work of Ms. Kearns but worth a read. The book traces the career achievements of these two historically significant men. I admit, I found TR much more interesting than Taft, but then Taft seemed a more passive player in life. I have read many of the TR books, but still found this one interesting as the story intertwines with Taft; how their bond is created and then tragically broken.
I craved a new book about the lives around the powerful, like Team of Rivals, but this was an interesting ride too. Love you Doris!

  • The Reading Promise

  • My Father and the Books We Shared
  • By: Alice Ozma, Jim Brozina (foreword)
  • Narrated by: Alice Ozma
  • Length: 7 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 32
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 28
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 27

When Alice Ozma was in fourth grade, she and her father decided to see if he could read aloud to her for 100 consecutive nights. On the hundreth night, they shared pancakes to celebrate, but it soon became evident that neither wanted to let go of their storytelling ritual. So they decided to continue what they called "The Streak". Alice's father read aloud to her every night without fail until the day she left for college.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • For anyone who loves books

  • By Daryl on 06-04-14

Not what I expected

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-21-11

This is more about the people and their interactions than about the books, or even why they made such a difficult committment. I found it to be an OK listen but I expected to hear more about love for literatue and each other when it really seems to be a habit that just evolved. I suppose I wanted something more romantic.

  • Obliquity

  • Why our goals are best achieved indirectly
  • By: John Kay
  • Narrated by: Erik Synnestvedt
  • Length: 4 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 43
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 36

A leading economist charts the indirect road to happiness and wealth. Using dozens of practical examples from the worlds of business, politics, science, sports, literature, even parenting, esteemed economist John Kay proves a notion that feels at once paradoxical and deeply commonsensical: The best way to achieve any complex or broadly defined goal-from happiness to wealth to profit to preventing forest fires-is the indirect way.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great material. Terrible narrator

  • By Thirdwaver on 12-19-14

Behaviors are paradoxical. Reader is annoying.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-29-11

Another book that points out that we may not be conscious of the motivation of our behaviors, especially when they do not align with our control and belief system. Stuff happens because of the meandering events of life more than the actual plan. Life is a serendipitous journey but we want to believe that we planned it that way.
May biggest complaint is the intonation of the readers voice. Maddening to hear the almost "uh" sound at the end of every sentence.
Gives words to what you may have already realized but not expressed.