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Reginald Williams

Orangeburg, SC United States
  • 25
  • reviews
  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 26
  • ratings
  • Sharp Objects

  • A Novel
  • By: Gillian Flynn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 9 hrs and 34 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 32,257
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,561
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,530

Words are like a road map to reporter Camille Preaker's troubled past. Fresh from a brief stay at a psychiatric hospital, Camille's first assignment from the second-rate daily paper where she works brings her reluctantly back to her hometown to cover the murders of two preteen girls.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Pitch Perfect Performance

  • By theenglishmajor on 02-14-14

Flynn's Preaker Elevates Plain Small Town Mystery

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-13-19

Flynn's Camille Preaker elevates an otherwise run-of-the mill journalist/detective story based on the small town/big city dichotomy of personable/impersonable emphasis of life.

Camille struggles to find meaning in having a straight-shooting life as a gifted Chicago reporter working in far less conditions than her talents belie, and it doesn't help when her amazingly supportive boss volun-tells her to go back to her hometown of Wind Gap, Missouri to investigate a recent murder. Everything then comes back, especially her relationship with her mother Adora and the complexity of her younger half sister Amma.

My favorite character in this story is Curry because he is the only one who loves Camille genuinely, and he tries HARD to keep doing it. I expected more from Detective Willis...just way too cliché...as was a lot of the story...but has some color due to Camille's personality and struggles.

Probably won't read it again, eve though Ann Marie Lee did fine with her vocals...even the male voices sounded pretty good.

  • The Horse Whisperer

  • By: Nicholas Evans
  • Narrated by: William Dufris
  • Length: 12 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 151
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 127
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 127

In a snow-covered morning in upstate New York, a girl out riding her horse is hit by a 40-ton truck. Though horribly injured, both 13-year-old Grace and her horse Pilgrim survive. Annie, Grace's mother, refuses to have Pilgrim destroyed and hears about a man in Montana, a 'whisperer' who is said to have the gift of healing troubled horses. They set off across the continent to find him and there, under the massive Montana sky, all their lives are changed forever.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Loved itđź’—

  • By Vienna Merritt on 09-09-15

Self Centeredness Destroys Marriages

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-10-19

Dufris does a fine job with Evans' unsettling story. Frankly, I find Annie to be one of the most unlikable heroines I have yet to experience in a post-WW2 novel. For all her talents and smarts, she is one unthinking, self centered, thoughtless, selfish person. She has to be to justify what she does in this story to her Husband (granted, not perfect himself,..but who is?) and Grace her daughter whose climatic reaction is scary, but totally understandable considering how betrayed she felt under such fragile mental circumstances. I found it despicable, and, as a man who loves marriage and embraces its challenges, Evans gives a story on "how not" to deal with "10+ marriage platitude." My message to you as you thumb through this head,-shaking story of a married woman with dangerously low self esteem: Affairs are NEVER justifiable no matter what, especially as a form of vindication marriage is for real problem solvers, not stupid people. Forgive...forgive...forgive...a sad story.

  • Howards End

  • By: E. M. Forster
  • Narrated by: Steven Crossley
  • Length: 11 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 149
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 137
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 133

Howards End is a beautifully subtle tale of two very different families brought together by an unusual event. The Schlegels are intellectuals, devotees of art and literature. The Wilcoxes are practical and materialistic, leading lives of "telegrams and anger". When the elder Mrs. Wilcox dies and her family discovers she has left their country home - Howards End - to one of the Schlegel sisters, a crisis between the two families is precipitated that takes years to resolve.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fantastic Narration in Delightful Story

  • By Wren on 05-05-18

A Tough, But Stately "Read" With Bad Narrator

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-18

Unfortunately, my first Forster book on Audible was a struggle to finish.

Henry Wilcox was my favorite character full of characters that, in my opinion, were not fleshed out enough in personality or given much to do. Henry at least had some nice words.

My favorite part was when Henry proposed to Margaret/Meg. Nicely paced with perfect pitch.

I think as nice as Crossley's voice sounds, his bad performance sunk this book for me. A book written by men with females as the main protagonists requires a male narrator who is excellent in creating different female voices. Crossley is worst than any narrator I have yet to hear on audible. All the female voices sound the same. With so many back and forth conversations between Margaret and Ellen without personal identification of who is speaking, the narrator needs to make voices distinctive since I dont have the book in front of me to know which character is speaking. Consequently, things got confusing thus making this talk-driven story hard to follow thus trying my patience and interest.

I would highly recommend another version of this classic book. I am getting my money back for this one.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • 1984

  • New Classic Edition
  • By: George Orwell
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 11 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23,380
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,310
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,335

George Orwell depicts a gray, totalitarian world dominated by Big Brother and its vast network of agents, including the Thought Police - a world in which news is manufactured according to the authorities' will and people live tepid lives by rote. Winston Smith, a hero with no heroic qualities, longs only for truth and decency. But living in a social system in which privacy does not exist and where those with unorthodox ideas are brainwashed or put to death, he knows there is no hope for him.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Come one, Come all into 1984!

  • By Kit McIlvaine (GirlPluggedN) on 02-18-08

Way Ahead of Its Time

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-24-18

Orwell sounds as though he lived in the 21st Century, then took a time machine back to the 1940s. This is a story of astonishing power and current relevance to reality.

Winston tries secretly to be different than the lifelessness society demands, but the society makes him...threatens him to conform...or else.

Julia is a character of extensive power. The female is all powerful in implication from the party's perspective because of how she is the keeper of sex. In her contradictions is where we find her humanity and the apex of Winston's societal struggle.

Prebble is probably the best I have heard. He has a bottomless amount of vocal characterizations that he can do it all...especially of women without sounding pretentious. Kudos to the scene when Winston and Julia first talk to each other.

This is indeed one of the best novels ever.

  • The Sound and the Fury

  • By: William Faulkner
  • Narrated by: Grover Gardner
  • Length: 8 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,224
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 876
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 878

First published in 1929, Faulkner created his "heart's darling", the beautiful and tragic Caddy Compson, whose story Faulkner told through separate monologues by her three brothers: the idiot Benjy, the neurotic suicidal Quentin, and the monstrous Jason.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Perfect!

  • By Bryan on 12-07-05

Speechless..

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-08-18

Without a doubt, I will read this INTENSELY complex book again one day. Ben is at the center of a family in Mississippi not unlike our own: dealing with the demons each family has while loving each other completely if not perfectly. As a special needs child/adult, Ben hears the "sound" of love/turmoil and feels the "fury" of all his loved ones' lives even though he may not understand everything. Caddy is lonely, Quinton is unconfident, Miss Quinton is oblivious, and Jason the Son loves too hard. Thank goodness for the moral compass of African American maid servant Dilsey. My favorite character is definitely Jason (the son) because he is a flawed individual hiding personal frustrations, yet trying VERY hard to live up to being the head of his crumbling family...and it tears at him furiously that He cannot "make things" work out right in overcoming mistakes made by his family members (including his mom, dad, and sister). Grover Gardner has a difficult job as narrator. The genius and difficulty in reading Faulkner is his intricate use of stream of consciousness and Southern diction making this a "not swift" read...but Gardner is AMAZING. He doesn't stumble one bit over any of the characterizations and gives just enough personality for you to tell one character from the next. Like all GREAT books (and this is without a doubt one of them), you will be compelled to read this again. I know I will.

  • Main Street

  • By: Sinclair Lewis
  • Narrated by: Brian Emerson
  • Length: 16 hrs and 21 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 114
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 78

The lonely predicament of Carol Kennicott, caught between her desires for social reform and individual happiness, reflects the position in which America's turn-of-the-century "emancipated woman" found herself.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Time for a classic

  • By Maureen on 10-21-09

Small Towns Are Paused

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-02-18

As a life-long resident of small towns (2,000-7,000 population), I found this a troublesome and fascinatingly critical story of the "paused in time and context" of small town culture.

Honestly, I really did not like Carol. To me she was stuck-up, entitled, and condescending to those of us who embrace the slowness and safely insular attitudes for those of us who live in small towns. She was ungrateful in my opinion of the fine life she had, the husband she had (no spouse is perfect), and the comfort and intimacy of neighborhood camaraderie that she sneered at politely rather than appreciated. This is not a thoughtful, intelligent character in my opinion. This was most on display not when she courted the idea of having an affair but because of the reason and quality of that "possible affair" because she was seemingly "bored" with the routine of her life. I can understand with one getting bored with small time life when you are either adjusted to or pining for large city cultural. On the other hand, when someone like Carol sees her life with such contempt, any romantic thoughts of intrigue and drama are careless due to her inability to "give Gopher P" a chance to be something important. Contempt for comfort is a dangerous place to be. Fortunately, Carol may have learned her lesson by the end of the story...but...

Brian Emerson does his best with the story, but he seems to have trouble differentiating the men in the story--all of them sound the same.

My favorite character was...Gopher P. The strongest part of Main Street is how superbly Lewis describes small town life in such sensorial beauty. There were several different instances that I cannot list them all. He makes it sound like a lovely, timeless world unto itself.

A interesting book that is worth looking at again, but quite critical of small town life as if it threatens the progress of civilization. It does just the opposite: small towns are the bastion of civilization in an uncivilized world in a major way.

  • My Cousin Rachel

  • By: Daphne du Maurier
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Pryce
  • Length: 11 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,586
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,469
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,458

Orphaned at an early age, Philip Ashley is raised by his benevolent older cousin, Ambrose. Resolutely single, Ambrose delights in Philip as his heir, a man who will love his grand home as much as he does himself. But the cosy world the two construct is shattered when Ambrose sets off on a trip to Florence. There he falls in love and marries - and there he dies suddenly.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • AN INCREDIBLE NOVEL -- HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!

  • By Janna Wong Healy on 07-08-15

Super Sad Suspenseful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-25-18

I loved this book. du Maurier is more familiar to me through the book Rebecca, but this was a different take on suspenseful, intense love. Rachel is a the object of a younger man's desire like nothing see before. The ending saddened me.

Nothing can be said to compliment Jonathan Pryce. He is brilliant. He makes Rachel sound perfect.

My favorite parts were...oh I won't spoil it. Please read this one, and always be forgiving of people's flaws by treating people the way you wish to be treated. Always look for the best in people.

  • King Solomon's Mines

  • By: Henry Rider Haggard
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 8 hrs and 50 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 866
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 791
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 795

One of the bestselling novels of the 19th century, King Solomon's Mines has inspired dozens of adventure stories, including Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan books and the Indiana Jones movies. Vivid and enormously action-packed, Henry Rider Haggard's tale of danger and discovery continues to shock and thrill, as it has since it was first presented to the public and heralded as "the most amazing book ever written."

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • From a different culture

  • By Ed on 07-08-13

Solid Male Friendship Classic

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-17-18

This tale of Allan Q, Captain Goode, and Sir Curtis is an efficient wonder. It is extremely well plotted and racial bias themes are well intertwined. My favorite character is definitely Goode. He was excellent comedy relief. My favorite part was when the three friends behold the minds for the first time.

Simon Prebble never fails to provide entertaining narration, and Haggard's clever adventure wordplay makes this a fine read.

  • The Three Musketeers

  • By: Alexandre Dumas
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 23 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,248
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,785
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,798

Mixing a bit of seventeenth-century French history with a great deal of invention, Alexandre Dumas tells the tale of young D'Artagnan and his musketeer comrades, Porthos, Athos, and Aramis. Together they fight to foil the schemes of the brilliant, dangerous Cardinal Richelieu, who pretends to support the king while plotting to advance his own power. Bursting with swirling swordplay, swooning romance, and unforgettable figures.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • An Irresistible Romp!

  • By Gillian on 01-28-14

Stirling Detailed Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-18

If every I have read a story of friendship and the diabolic evil possible in a female, Dumas is it. The story itself is fascinating in its detailed dialogue (sometimes lasting for 15-20 minutes like in rea life), and--like a great page-turner--each word is important to the story.

My favorite character is definitely Athos. He is a study in inner torture and bitterness over a love that did not go as he wished. Troisville was a wonderful fatherly character, but I was surprised at the detail rendered to all of the characters, especially the musketeers lackies--Planchet, Grimaud, Mousqueton, and Bazin.


Now, John Lee, the narrator...amazing job considering the difficulty of the material. At times, he had to balance 3-4 voices at one time (especially) at the end, and did a wonderful job. You do have to pay close attention, though, so that you don't lose track of who is saying who. I like him.


Great book...great story...and full of tons of parts that are fun to re-read again and again.

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 215,575
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 201,317
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 200,901

At once wildly original and stuffed with irresistible nostalgia, Ready Player One is a spectacularly genre-busting, ambitious, and charming debut—part quest novel, part love story, and part virtual space opera set in a universe where spell-slinging mages battle giant Japanese robots, entire planets are inspired by Blade Runner, and flying DeLoreans achieve light speed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I’m sorry I waited so long to read this book.

  • By Julie W. Capell on 05-27-14

Live in Reality...Because It's Real!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-22-18

What made the experience of listening to Ready Player One the most enjoyable?

The sheer loving, detail of the 1980s encompassed in this book is what made READY PLAYER ONE an unforgettable experience. Cline was able to inject Star Wars Fanaticism, 1970/80s Anime, New Wave Music, and classic teen angst cinema/culture into an engrossing story that touches the themes of loneliness, suicide, cynicism, the dark side of immersive technology and how it affects human civilization, gamesmanship, friendship, identity, self-esteem, fatherly role models, diversity, dysfunctional family life, and lastly...love (or some kind of unrequited love). The last sentence in the book is near perfect.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Wade/Parzival was my favorite character because of his complex problem in dealing with his identify. He wanted to know who he was, what his placement in "reality" was, and why it mattered. He needed to be a "ready" "#1" "Player" in order to find this eventually.

What about Wil Wheaton’s performance did you like?

Wheaton SOUNDS like he is the 1980s. His voice inflections evoke the era, and he know exactly how to express irony, wryness, and wit from Cline's words. Amazing.

Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

When Parizval and H meet for the first time. STUNNING!!! it was so lovely that it had me in tears.

Any additional comments?

Read this book. It will be a wonderful "period" class one day.