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Linda

CAMP HILL, Pennsylvania
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 102
  • helpful votes
  • 23
  • ratings
  • Stoner

  • By: John Williams
  • Narrated by: Robin Field
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,023
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,806
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,812

William Stoner is born at the end of the 19th century into a dirt-poor Missouri farming family. Sent to the state university to study agronomy, he instead falls in love with English literature and embraces a scholar's life, far different from the hardscrabble existence he has known. And yet as the years pass, Stoner encounters a succession of disappointments.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A fascinating book

  • By Mark J. Lura on 07-12-11

Moving story of a dry quiet life<br />

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-05-19

I dreaded reading the book, based on the description. but it was lovely, moving, insightful.

  • Journey to Munich

  • A Maisie Dobbs Novel
  • By: Jacqueline Winspear
  • Narrated by: Orlagh Cassidy
  • Length: 9 hrs and 18 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,529
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,378
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,368

It's early 1938, and Maisie Dobbs is back in England. On a fine yet chilly morning, as she walks toward Fitzroy Square - a place of many memories - she is intercepted by Brian Huntley and Robert MacFarlane of the Secret Service. The German government has agreed to release a British subject from prison, but only if he is handed over to a family member. Because the man's wife is bedridden and his daughter has been killed in an accident, the Secret Service wants Maisie - who bears a striking resemblance to the daughter - to retrieve the man from Dachau....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very intense thriller!

  • By Wayne on 03-30-16

My First and Last Masie Dobbs

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-18

simplistic, padded, repetitive. Masie doesn't do anything clever. Just obvious. And at the end incomprehensible and never explained. She is supposed to be observant but goes to the bohemian area of Munich and does not describe one interesting entertainer or shop or person. But we do get at least four rehashes of what she learned while serving as a nurse in Spain. No, silly. nothing interesting. Just yadda yadda about finding herself. This book is terrible. I think it's the equivalent of a romance novel with minor violence substituted for heaving passion. oh boy. not for me. back to smart writers with a quick pace, like Dick Francis.

  • National Security

  • By: Marc Cameron
  • Narrated by: Tom Weiner
  • Length: 8 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,441
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,307
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,315

When terrorism goes viral, one man goes ballistic. They can strike anytime, anywhere. A public landmark. A suburban shopping mall. And now, the human body itself. Three Middle Eastern terrorists have been injected with a biological weapon, human time bombs unleashed on American soil. They are prepared to die. To spread their disease. To annihilate millions. If America hopes to fight this enemy from within, it needs a new kind of weapon. Meet Special Agent Jericho Quinn.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Not bad if there's nothing left in your wish list

  • By Samuel on 06-15-15

Which is worse, the writing or the narration?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-16

Any additional comments?

Thin, no, make that NO character development. A plot that jumps and scrambles. The usual conceit that two or three people alone are trying to defeat a plot to kill thousands and terrorize the United States. Sexist. The writing is terrible. One good thing, the author apparently knows a lot about the military/weapons/lingo etc. But, nah. This is sub par, even for light reading. The only reason I didn't send it back was because it was on sale and it was worth $5 to state my opinion. I hope the narrator has another line of work.
The author too.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Spill Simmer Falter Wither

  • By: Sara Baume
  • Narrated by: John Keating
  • Length: 7 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,140
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,039
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 1,045

A debut novel already praised as "unbearably poignant and beautifully told" (Eimear McBride), this captivating story follows - over the course of four seasons - a misfit man who adopts a misfit dog. It is springtime, and two outcasts - a man ignored, even shunned by his village, and the one-eyed dog he takes into his quiet, tightly shuttered life - find each other, by accident or fate, and forge an unlikely connection. As their friendship grows, their small seaside town suddenly takes note of them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Simply Beautiful

  • By Sara on 03-14-16

So Sad and So Beautiful

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-24-16

Any additional comments?

The narrator beautifully embodies the main character, a sociopathic loner who is, nonetheless, achingly sympathetic. The language is lyrical (although the Irish seem to have an over-fondness for the word "tumbledown") and John Keating inhabits it completely. The story: the main and really only character other than One Eye, the dog, adopts a scruffy, mangled dog, somewhat like himself. The reader is at first hopeful that this will be a healing relationship. But the narrator's life is burdensome, and the facts slowly emerge of what he had done in his 57 years of life and what leads to the adoption of the dog. There is a twist even I, who am always on my toes expecting this and that, did not expect and yet it was beautifully explicated, The writing is gorgeous. Some of it is slow, the lists of flora and fauna. (The narrator spent his childhood teaching himself about nature in books.) His understanding of nature is, in part, an understanding of himself. Highly recommended but not for the faint of heart. Expect dread and tears.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Pillars of the Earth

  • By: Ken Follett
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 40 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 24,802
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,293
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,331

The Pillars of the Earth tells the story of Philip, prior of Kingsbridge, a devout and resourceful monk driven to build the greatest Gothic cathedral the world has known...of Tom, the mason who becomes his architect - a man divided in his soul...of the beautiful, elusive Lady Aliena, haunted by a secret shame...and of a struggle between good and evil that will turn church against state, and brother against brother.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Couldn't Take My Buds Out

  • By Judith on 11-08-07

Prime Follet

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-16

Any additional comments?

What an amazing trip through a time period (before the Renaissance) little known or understood. Great characters. Great narration. Wonderful details about business. Strong women. One small complaint. I'm not giving anything away (really) but if you hate knowing anything about a plot stop here.A warehouse full of wool in sacks burns. I don't think so. I think wool, filled with lanolin, packed in sacks, would not burn like that. I may be wrong, but that's my suspicion. This book really stays with you. Right now I want to go on a walking trip through the great cathedrals of Europe.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Surrender, New York

  • By: Caleb Carr
  • Narrated by: Tom Taylorson
  • Length: 23 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1,384
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 1,270
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,271

In rural, impoverished Burgoyne County, New York, a pattern of strange deaths begins to emerge: Adolescent boys and girls are found murdered, their corpses left hanging in gruesome, ritualistic fashion. Senior law enforcement officials are quick to blame a serial killer, but their efforts to apprehend this criminal are peculiarly ineffective.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Wanted to love this but...

  • By Mark Hancock on 09-27-16

Uneven while so very skilled

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-16

Any additional comments?

The writing is so very good, especially the dialog of the younger kids. It sounds so real. And the plot keeps humming along. But... this is a very long book, and I felt there were way too many coincidences, too many plot stumbles. Far too many coincidences. Even the basic idea behind the plot is confused. And small things. The blind girl has a cat ... oh we forgot about the cat... oh we remember she has a cat .... what was the point of that? And why talk about going to New York City about 20 chapters ahead of time, get old aunty to agree to pay for the trip and then not go for page after page after page ... did we forget? And what was in New York that we couldn't figure out from Upstate? Why did he HAVE to go there? Remember the rule about introducing a gun? The same should apply for books that take place in the back woods but talk about going to New York City.
It's clear the author thinks there is nothing remarkable about an old coot having a fling with a girl who is hardly out of her teens (although one who is blind yet able to buy coordinating bed linens, clothing and curtains in her bed chamber, in fact it is so unremarkable that pretty much no one mentions it. That said, the sex was well done. Obviously I'm of mixed minds about this book. I know that part of New York State very well, and have no problem with his depiction of it. In fact, that was part of the pleasure of reading it. But will other people feel that the length of the book is worth the candle? Literally worth burning down the candle to read it all. The book left me feeling unsatisfied. And yes, I've read the positive reviews, which seem to be reviews of Caleb Carr more than of this book. (Apparently he's an old coot who likes to date young women. Surprise.)

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo

  • By: Amy Schumer
  • Narrated by: Amy Schumer
  • Length: 8 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,821
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,096
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,061

In The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo, Amy mines her past for stories about her teenage years, her family, relationships, and sex and shares the experiences that have shaped who she is - a woman with the courage to bare her soul to stand up for what she believes in, all while making us laugh. Down to earth and relatable, frank and unapologetic, Amy Schumer is one of us: She relies on her sister for advice, still hangs out with her high school pals, and continues to navigate the ever-changing boundaries in love, work, and life.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • mind numbing

  • By katrina on 09-17-16

You Gotta Love This Woman

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-16

Any additional comments?

She's a brave, deeply funny person, and the humor comes out of a refreshing attitude, unusual in a woman. (Don't shoot me for saying that. It's true. Women get criticized for being as honest and, actually, as crude, as she is.) Here's the problem. She wrote a book. Now she's reading a book. And it SOUNDS like she's reading a book. Good god. This is a woman who does stand up for a living. An actress. At some points she even sounds bored. Someone should have found a way of recording this to make her more lively, and alive. Odd.

6 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Howards End

  • By: E. M. Forster
  • Narrated by: Emma Thompson
  • Length: 3 hrs and 2 mins
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 78
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 65

At the heart of Forester's masterpiece lie two families: the wealthy and business-minded Wilcoxes and the cultured and idealistic Schlegels. When the beautiful and independent Helen Schlegel begins an impetuous affair with the ardent Paul Wilcox, a series of events is sparked: some very funny, some very tragic, that results in a dispute over who will inherit Howards End, the Wilcoxes' charming country home.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Something's Missing in this Abridged Version

  • By Deborah on 09-14-09

Love Emma, Hate the Adbridgement

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-16

Any additional comments?

Emma Thompson is, of course, sublime, and her voice is not just an instrument but an entire orchestra. However, why was she conned into reading this abridged version of the book. The prose is so sublime, is the exact point of the book. I could see an abridged version of Anna Karenina (I know, shocking, but let me at it), but why Howard's End? I hope this isn't so college students can pretend to have read the book.
Why Emma, why?

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Money

  • A Suicide Note
  • By: Martin Amis
  • Narrated by: Graeme Malcom
  • Length: 15 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 493
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 370
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 370

The story of John Self and his insatiable appetite for money, alcohol, drugs, porn, and more. Ceaselessly inventive and thrillingly savage, it is a tale of life lived without restraint, of money and the disasters it can precipitate.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Offensive as hell, insightfull, and brave

  • By Linda on 09-06-16

Offensive as hell, insightfull, and brave

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-16

Any additional comments?

Graeme Malcom doesn't so much read the book but live it. An amazing performance, especially from someone who has done such gentile work as "Old Filth," which, despite its title, is about a lawyer in Hong Kong. (Filth is an acronym for "Failed in London Try Hong Kong." I've known about Martin Amis for decades, and read his criticism and nonfiction. I've read reviews of his fiction, and I've read a number of stories about him, his father, his bad teeth, etc. I risked reading this book just to say I had, and it is scalding. But only at this point in my life can I say that I have known someone like the main character, John. And the device of introducing "Martin Amis," the writer, as a character in the book is sheer brilliance. I was deeply impressed by the writing, the characterizations, the plotting, the whole package. It's a bit rough to listen to. You will want ear buds. This really is old filth. But full of humor and deep understanding of tortured souls.

7 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • The Girl You Left Behind

  • By: Jojo Moyes
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Penny Rawlins
  • Length: 13 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,511
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,180
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,168

France, 1916: Artist Edouard Lefevre leaves his young wife, Sophie, to fight at the front. When their small town falls to the Germans in the midst of World War I, Edouard’s portrait of Sophie draws the eye of the new Kommandant. As the officer’s dangerous obsession deepens, Sophie will risk everything - her family, her reputation, and her life - to see her husband again.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Exquisite Portrait of Sophie and Liz

  • By FanB14 on 09-03-13

French narrator, Clare Corbett, is terrible

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-19-16

Any additional comments?

It's been said before, but it deserves to be said again. The narrator of the French portion of the book is nearly unbearable. She screeches. Every line except "whot?" sounds like Edvard Munch;s paintings look. You want to slap her. That does not make one sympathetic to her story.
And now that I've listened to the whole book, I cannot unhear it. Sad. Very sad. Because the contemporary (London) portion of the book is clever and fun, very insider and knowing. And why did the author set this back in the Great War instead of in WWII. What are the chances of anyone surviving to testify in court, or the chances of scraps of paper surviving. I don't think the most widely documented art in history from the 1910s has had so much documentation: letters, articles, stories in Architectural Digest. It's a bit much.
But back to the French narration.
Where was the producer of this audio book? How did this happen? Isn't someone supposed to be directing this stuff? I'm sure Ms. Corbett did not come up with this reading on her own.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful