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Carol Parker

Placitas, NM
  • 7
  • reviews
  • 19
  • helpful votes
  • 29
  • ratings
  • Formerly Known as Food

  • How the Industrial Food System Is Changing Our Minds, Bodies, and Culture
  • By: Kristin Lawless
  • Narrated by: Jennywren Walker
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 15
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 14

In Formerly Known as Food, Kristin Lawless argues that, because of the degradation of our diet, our bodies are literally changing from the inside out. The billion-dollar food industry is reshaping our food preferences, altering our brains, changing the composition of our microbiota, and even affecting the expression of our genes. Lawless chronicles how this is happening and what it means for our bodies, health, and survival. An independent journalist and nutrition expert, Lawless is emerging as the voice of a new generation of food thinkers. 

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Don't waste a credit here

  • By Carol Parker on 08-18-18

Don't waste a credit here

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-18-18

This book appears to be a nonstop rant about all the things that are wrong with our food system. If you believe this author, there is nothing you can do except join a revolution where we must all be involved in bringing food into our communities. Sorry. I have no time to join a revolution or contribute to a coop. I barely have time to spend with my friends doing what I'd like to do. I don't accept the rant that the only thing that is worth doing is to join a revolution. And this author's histrionic talk about various aspects of our food supply is over the top. The narrator really adds to it with her over the top emotion. If you thought you would learn something about how to eat in a more healthy way, you'll be disappointed. If you want a non-stop rant about Gosh Aint It Awful--then maybe this is the book for you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Celts

  • Life and Times in Iron Age Europe
  • By: Ray Abel
  • Narrated by: Samuel Pehling
  • Length: 54 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 5
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars 5

This book contains all the information that you need to know about the Celts in a compact and to the point format. The book is targeted toward people who love to learn about history but do not have the time and energy to listen to the typically long historic texts. The book begins with a look at how the Celts came to be and highlights their meteoric rise. The shortcomings of the Celts ultimately lead to their downfall and this is described in sufficient detail.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Celts Life and Times

  • By Ali on 10-05-18

Don't bother with this book.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-22-16

I think this book was a high school paper. There are grammar errors. A significant section of the book consists of recitations of Celt god names. This is not up to audible quality.

  • Musicophilia

  • Tales of Music and the Brain
  • By: Oliver Sacks
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 836
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 499
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 493

Music can move us to the heights or depths of emotion. It can persuade us to buy something, or remind us of our first date. It can lift us out of depression when nothing else can. It can get us dancing to its beat. But the power of music goes much, much further. Indeed, music occupies more areas of our brain than language does - humans are a musical species.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A must for music lovers

  • By Shimon on 11-19-07

Tough going - hope it improves

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-26-15

What disappointed you about Musicophilia?

I usually love books by Oliver Sacks. This one has really dragged and I am only two hours into it. He spends too much time telling us about ear worms he has had. I'm sure they were interesting to him but...really?

Would you ever listen to anything by Oliver Sacks again?

Yes, I usually love books by Oliver Sacks.

Would you be willing to try another one of John Lee’s performances?

Maybe - he voice is a bit sonorous and that may have affected my impression. I couldn't listen to it for too long because it made me sleepy.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from Musicophilia?

Ear worm stories

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • H Is for Hawk

  • By: Helen Macdonald
  • Narrated by: Helen Macdonald
  • Length: 11 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,995
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,722
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,712

When Helen MacDonald's father died suddenly on a London street, she was devastated. An experienced falconer captivated by hawks since childhood, she'd never before been tempted to train one of the most vicious predators: the goshawk. But in her grief, she saw that the goshawk's fierce and feral anger mirrored her own.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Mabel The Hawk--The Fire That Burned The Hurts Away

  • By Sara on 04-09-15

Perhaps the best book I've ever listened to

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-26-15

Would you consider the audio edition of H Is for Hawk to be better than the print version?

I have not read the print edition. However, I think the author's performance of her work is truly wonderful.

What does Helen Macdonald bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

Her feeling in the narration is beyond compare.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes, this is the first book I have ever listened to that I could hardly stop listening to.

Any additional comments?

The best listen ever.

14 of 14 people found this review helpful

  • Folks, This Ain't Normal

  • A Farmer's Advice for Happier Hens, Healthier People, and a Better World
  • By: Joel Salatin
  • Narrated by: Joel Salatin
  • Length: 15 hrs and 14 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,513
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,385
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,381

From farmer Joel Salatin's point of view, life in the 21st century just ain't normal. In Folks, This Ain't Normal, he discusses how far removed we are from the simple, sustainable joy that comes from living close to the land and the people we love.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Awakened me from my ingnorance

  • By matthew on 05-27-12

Wish he had stuck to eating healthy food

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-21-14

What did you like best about Folks, This Ain't Normal? What did you like least?

He definitely persuaded me that the processed food we eat is really bad--completely dependent on non-stop antibiotics, raised in gross conditions, and dependent on transportation over thousands of miles. He also persuaded me that the way he raises animals and the way he farms is better for the earth, better for people's health, and better for his local community. But he goes on WAY TOO MUCH about his political beliefs which I find are poorly thought through and internally inconsistent. The last few chapters I had to skip entirely because I got so tired of it. But the first part of the book was better and very interesting.

What was most disappointing about Joel Salatin’s story?

Too much political diatribe that became tiresome to hear.

What about Joel Salatin’s performance did you like?

It was well narrated and entertaining except toward the end when it veered into politics.

Do you think Folks, This Ain't Normal needs a follow-up book? Why or why not?

Not unless he gets control over his political preaching.

Any additional comments?

If the politics were cut out, it would be about 2/3 as long and would be a better book.

A Dog's Purpose audiobook cover art
  • A Dog's Purpose

  • A Novel for Humans
  • By: W. Bruce Cameron
  • Narrated by: George K. Wilson
  • Length: 9 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,440
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,537
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,537

After a tragically short life as a stray mutt, Bailey is surprised to find himself reborn as a rambunctious golden-haired puppy. Bailey's search for his new life's meaning leads him into the loving arms of eight-year-old Ethan. During their countless adventures, Bailey joyously discovers how to be a good dog. But this life as a beloved family pet is not the end of Bailey's journey. Reborn as a puppy yet again, Bailey wonders, will he ever find his purpose?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best dog book ever!

  • By Blythe on 08-27-10

Too childish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-11

If you want a book that is sickly sweet and overly simplistic, written by someone who is not all that knowledgeable about dogs, this is your book. Otherwise, skip this one.

  • The Wolf in the Parlor

  • The Eternal Connection Between Humans and Dogs
  • By: Jon Franklin
  • Narrated by: George K. Wilson
  • Length: 10 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 77
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 37

Of all the things hidden in plain sight, dogs are one of the most enigmatic. They are everywhere, but how much do we really know about where they came from and what the implications are of their place in our world? Jon Franklin set out to find out and ended up spending a decade studying the origins and significance of the dog and its peculiar attachment to humans.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • More Science than Story

  • By Jay Marie on 08-02-10

One of the best books ever!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-23-11

I have enjoyed this book tremendously. The author is a science writer who, at the beginning of the book, has little to no interest in dogs. He meets a woman who he eventually marries and who insists that they get a puppy. This sparks his interest and he is intrigued by why we have this other species occupying such a privileged position in our lives. He uses his talent as a science writer to cover a broad range of science issue that shed light on the relationship between humans and dogs. This book is in some ways similar to Patricia McConnell's "For the Love of a Dog" except her book is heavier in neurobiology and this book is stronger in evolution. Both books are excellent. I highly recommend this book as well as hers.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful