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Descriptive and inspiring

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-16-19

The author’s account of 19th century Chicago is a great introduction to the history of the city and I’d highly recommend this book to be read first if you want a history overview of Chicago’s beginnings. The narrator is also entertaining to listen to (his accents are humorous to listen to) and delivers a quality listening experience to listeners.

A basket of emotions in one book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-31-18

Lyndsey’s reflection upon her work as a war photographer had illustrated a sense of appreciation for the live she was spared along with the other roles she played in her life. I feel like there is still more to her story to this day, but her book dives deep into the meat of her highlights in her life. Very well written and worth a read.

Phenomenal

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-19-18

This book is a must read in order to grasp the basics on how to defeat the seemingly powerful as an underdog with more than you can expect from a simple David and Goliath story. The book is not saturated in research while it grasps the power of real world anecdotes to explain the power of the underdog. I highly recommend this read.

Worth Reading if you’re interested in changing the education system

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-18

The book was very well researched and strongly defended against possible criticisms of Caplan’s arguments. Many key opposing viewpoints to Caplan’s arguments were discussed and well debated over. Frankly, the book deserves to be taken seriously as it strongly challenges the popular support for a flawed system of education.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

Outdated, NOT FOR THE SECOND EDITION

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-02-18

I enjoyed the simplicity of Andrew’s book, especially his second edition which I was reading along with the audiobook.

Unfortunately, it appears that he has not provided audio for the second edition and there are major differences between the first and second editions. This took away from the enjoyment of the book, which is a shame.

The audio reader did a fine job with the narration, it’s just a shame that I wasn’t able to get one for the second edition.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

A must read for ALL who invest in the stock market

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-31-18

The narration greatly supplemented Graham’s legendary book through its clear speech and soothing tone. As for the book itself, I feel like Zweig’s commentary greatly helps today’s readers in understanding Graham’s work through a contemporary (2000s) analysis of Graham’s ideas and examples. The book can be a tough read at times, especially for the first time investor, but with patience and the willingness to learn, the book will provide all the essential basics of investing in the stock market.

Rich Dad Poor Dad 2.0

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-18

Kiyosaki has made an amazing job writing this book emphasizing the significance of financial education every child needs to know in life. There are some things that every reader should know:
1) Don’t take the title too seriously. Obviously not all C students live to become the leaders of our world guiding the A students and the rest of us in life. I looked at the title as more of a metaphor describing how capitalists and entrepreneurs who would more likely have the work ethic of a C student in school tend to become the leaders of the intelligent A students who work like employees, not employers.

2) His ideas are repetitive. Often you’ll notice that he tends to repeat his ideas over and over again. Although it does get into your mind very well, it does get annoying after a while.

3) There’s a fair amount of Rich Dad Poor Dad references in this book. You can just as well read Rich Dad Poor Dad and get a reasonably similar amount of content.

4) He tends to promote his products quite a bit. I have not bought his board games yet, but he makes a lot of references to his board game mentioning how it will be the ultimate tool in giving your child the financial education they deserve. It may or may not work if you buy his product, but be aware that he’s here to help your child become rich while filling his own pockets with as much wealth as possible.

5) Simple read, simple vocabulary. Kiyosaki is clear with the terms and definitions he sets in his book similar to how he did it in Rich Dad Poor Dad.

Whether you love or hate Kiyosaki, I’d recommend this book to parents, teens, or average people as an introduction to financial education. There’s nothing intricate into how to create your own business or invest in real estate, it’s just a simple overall picture on the basis of the financial world we live in.

Not a bad read, but I’d suggest to keep searching for more financial books to build your financial knowledge even further.