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Gwen Tylbon

Oklahoma City
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  • reviews
  • 5
  • helpful votes
  • 3
  • ratings
  • Shadow of Night

  • By: Deborah Harkness
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Ikeda
  • Length: 24 hrs and 25 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17,283
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,660
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 15,643

Picking up from A Discovery of Witches’ cliffhanger ending, Shadow of Night takes Diana and Matthew on a trip through time to Elizabethan London, where they are plunged into a world of spies, magic, and a coterie of Matthew’s old friends, the School of Night. As the search for Ashmole 782 deepens and Diana seeks out a witch to tutor her in magic, the net of Matthew’s past tightens around them, and they embark on a very different - and vastly more dangerous - journey.   

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Recommended, however....

  • By J. Lunsford on 07-15-12

Excellent story, even better narration<br />

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-18-18

The story is wonderful and engaging. Jennifer Iketa paints such distinct characters with her voice it is amazing.

  • The Language of Food

  • A Linguist Reads the Menu
  • By: Dan Jurafsky
  • Narrated by: Steven Menasche
  • Length: 6 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 80
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 71
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 71

Thirteen chapters evoke the joy and discovery of reading a menu dotted with the sharp-eyed annotations of a linguist. Jurafsky points out the subtle meanings hidden in filler words like "rich" and "crispy," zeroes in on the metaphors and storytelling tropes we rely on in restaurant reviews, and charts a micro-universe of marketing language on the back of a bag of potato chips.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Highly interesting but a lot of fluff

  • By cpip on 01-24-15

A good blend of food and language.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-04-17

Not a bad read. Short and interesting enough. He swings from being a bit too heady to a smidge pedantic from time to time but overall it has good content and explanation of terms, techniques and ideas. He uses anecdotal transitions quite a bit that I found slightly out of place given the rest of the story but not so much as it detracted from the overall story. I didn't much care for the narrator at first but ultimately his tone and pacing worked with the book.

  • Consider the Fork

  • A History of How We Cook and Eat
  • By: Bee Wilson
  • Narrated by: Alison Larkin
  • Length: 11 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 996
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 888
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 887

Since prehistory, humans have braved the business ends of knives, scrapers, and mashers, all in the name of creating something delicious - or at least edible. In Consider the Fork, award-winning food writer and historian Bee Wilson traces the ancient lineage of our modern culinary tools, revealing the startling history of objects we often take for granted. Charting the evolution of technologies from the knife and fork to the gas range and the sous-vide cooker, Wilson offers unprecedented insights.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Intriguing history of everyday utensils

  • By Amazon Customer on 03-31-14

Informatively Whimsical

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-18-17

A great look at the evolution of cooking technology that blends history with a light humor and realistic examination of the role of cooking and the tools used to do so.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful