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Steve Winnett

Massachusetts
  • 27
  • reviews
  • 59
  • helpful votes
  • 28
  • ratings
  • Asymmetry

  • A Novel
  • By: Lisa Halliday
  • Narrated by: Candace Thaxton, Arthur Morey, Fiona Hardingham, and others
  • Length: 8 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 420
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 381
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 379

Told in three distinct and uniquely compelling sections, Asymmetry explores the imbalances that spark and sustain many of our most dramatic human relations: inequities in age, power, talent, wealth, fame, geography, and justice. The first section, "Folly", tells the story of Alice, a young American editor, and her relationship with the famous and much older writer Ezra Blazer. A tender and exquisite account of an unexpected romance that takes place in New York during the early years of the Iraq War.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Unsatisfying

  • By MConway on 05-27-18

Tedious and pretentious nonsense

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-24-18

This is the first of the New York Times's 10 best books for 2018 I have listened to. It is absolutely awful. To quote Gertrude Stein on Oakland, "There is no there there." I don't care about the gold digger Alice who spreads her legs for the aging fraud Ezra in the first part, nor do I care one whit for the stupid remarks and life of an Iraqi American economist being detained at Heathrow, and Ezra Blazer's dumb interview at the end sheds no light on this "narrative" for me. What a total fraud this book is! Are the other 9 of the New York Times's 10 best books for 2018 as bad as this totally overhyped, shallow, stupid collection of words? A collection of words is actually a good way to describe this book - there is so much filler material just to stretch it out so it is long enough to be called a "novel". Long quotes from books, reading out all the names of jurors being selected, long descriptions of baseball games - nothing but filler! I soldiered on to the end waiting for some revelation - nothing. This book is a giant con job. I really regret that I spent my hard-earned money on this overrated garbage.

  • We Are Legion (We Are Bob)

  • Bobiverse, Book 1
  • By: Dennis E. Taylor
  • Narrated by: Ray Porter
  • Length: 9 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 66,037
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 61,983
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 61,855

Bob Johansson has just sold his software company and is looking forward to a life of leisure. There are places to go, books to read, and movies to watch. So it's a little unfair when he gets himself killed crossing the street. Bob wakes up a century later to find that corpsicles have been declared to be without rights, and he is now the property of the state. He has been uploaded into computer hardware and is slated to be the controlling AI in an interstellar probe looking for habitable planets.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Ignore the Publisher's Summary! This is Amazing!

  • By PW on 04-12-17

Amusing Start, Tedious and Pointless Finish

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-06-18

Ray Porter does a great job as narrator but the story he is handed turns into a dreadfully dull and pointless one. In the end who really cares what all these replicant spaceships are doing out there in the universe? The "plot" wanders all over the place and then just ends because enough words have been written to fill a book. In the meantime the author projects that humanity will destroy this planet through nuclear warfare in a little over 100 years, so the remnants of humanity deserve to populate other planets out there after destroying this one? You end up getting bored with the irritatingly geekish Bobs and indifferent to the fate of humanity, waiting for some deus ex machina aliens to drop out of the sky and just wipe out these pathetic cretins who have no business replicating their planet-destroying culture elsewhere. The book does show you how incredibly dull a world without women becomes in a universe full of Bobs without any babes - if you'll pardon the expression. You can produce 50 more of these pointless juvenile narratives count me out Mr. Taylor.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Miss Subways

  • A Novel
  • By: David Duchovny
  • Narrated by: David Duchovny, Tea Leoni
  • Length: 6 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 166
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 150
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 150

Emer is just a woman living in New York City who takes the subway, buys ice cream from the bodega on the corner, has writerly aspirations, and lives with her boyfriend, Con. But is this life she lives the only path she’s on?  

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • wonderful storytelling at its finest!

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-03-18

Irish Myth + NYC Subway = A Wonderful Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-16-18

First of all, this is a very *literary* book, make no mistake of it. The New York Times should be ashamed of themselves for discussing (rather than reviewing) this utterly original and wonderful creation in the "Style" section because it was written by an actor and is therefore considered by them to be somehow "not literary". How wrong these snobs of the elite can be! David Duchovny has created something utterly new and original out of some old Irish cloth and his own sardonic wit and his sense of humanity. This book has its origins in the play "The Only Jealousy of Emer" by W.B. Yeats but to say that may be off-putting to many and I urge them to see past this and instead savor something truly original and non-derivative. For me this book compares favorably with George Saunders' wonderful "Lincoln In The Bardo" in that we see in these two books how literature offers the creative artist the greatest freedom from the linear, spatial, and chronological constraints we must endure as residents of this temporal world. Between the covers of a book the author can invent whatever he or she wants to give birth to! Both of these books are wonderful exercises in fantasy and history which at the same time have at their core a life-affirming sense of what is possible to us in this life.
By the way, Audible - my first impulse on listening to both of these fantastic books was to give them as gifts and I find I can't do this. What is wrong with you? Have you lost your minds? People who enjoy books love sharing them with other people and you don't want us to do this? You have been "fixing" the Give As A Gift option you removed it seems like forever don't you want the business gift-giving will generate? Is this really so hard to figure out?

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Aurora

  • By: Kim Stanley Robinson
  • Narrated by: Ali Ahn
  • Length: 16 hrs and 56 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,476
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 2,294
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 2,291

A major new novel from one of science fiction's most powerful voices, Aurora tells the incredible story of our first voyage beyond the solar system. Brilliantly imagined and beautifully told, it is the work of a writer at the height of his powers.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Beautiful

  • By ewreirct on 07-14-15

Disappointing Effort From A Fine Writer

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-27-18

What disappointed you about Aurora?

{SPOILERS GALORE HERE skip if you wish.} The author was here writing H.G. Wells "The War of the Worlds" in reverse. Wells's Martians are killed not by Earth's weapons but by its tiny, alien (to the Martians) microbes. I would have preferred a narrative that ended this way. I found myself totally uninterested in the whining Freya and her followers running away from (a.k.a. deserting) those who set foot on the small moon Aurora. The deus ex machina injection of hibernation to enable the lead characters to get back to Earth was undermined by the ship's sudden immunity to all the problems of deterioration it was experiencing on the trip back. These problems of deterioration would have sidelined the ship and killed the hybernauts, yet these problems just conveniently disappear from the narrative. Freya is a whining loser and so are her band of followers. She and her followers also desert the colonists on Iris who surely could have used the resources of the full starship. The ending on the beach on Earth is just ridiculous. I will continue to check out Kim Stanley Robinson's books - he is an intelligent and interesting writer - but this one for me was just a major disappointment. It's hard to like a book when you find yourself loathing the main character.

What do you think your next listen will be?

Not sure.

What does Ali Ahn bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

She did a fantastic job with the voice of the ship.

What character would you cut from Aurora?

Freya - which would mean the end of the book. But I detest her.

Any additional comments?

I loved New York 2140, the Mars books, and The Years of Rice and Salt. I will give Mr. Robinson a pass on this one in hope of finding other of his books more to my liking. Most good writers have to be allowed a clunker or two.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Woman in the Window

  • A Novel
  • By: A. J. Finn
  • Narrated by: Ann Marie Lee
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20,191
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 18,573
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18,518

Anna Fox lives alone - a recluse in her New York City home, unable to venture outside. She spends her day drinking wine (maybe too much), watching old movies, recalling happier times...and spying on her neighbors. Then the Russells move into the house across the way: a father, mother, their teenaged son. The perfect family. But when Anna, gazing out her window one night, sees something she shouldn't, her world begins to crumble. And its shocking secrets are laid bare.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • STAY AWAY!!!

  • By Susan Olson on 06-02-18

Stupid woman narrates a stupid story

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-28-18

Would you try another book from A. J. Finn and/or Ann Marie Lee?

No.

What could A. J. Finn have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

Never have written it.

How did the narrator detract from the book?

Narrator does not create the material, the author does.

If you could play editor, what scene or scenes would you have cut from The Woman in the Window?

The beginning, the middle, and the end.

Any additional comments?

Story and main character simply lack credibility. Awful book.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Lincoln Myth

  • A Novel
  • By: Steve Berry
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 14 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,164
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,049
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,047

New York Times best-selling author Steve Berry returns with his latest thriller, a Cotton Malone adventure involving a flaw in the United States Constitution, a mystery about Abraham Lincoln, and a political issue that’s as explosive as it is timely - not only in Malone’s world, but in ours. September 1861: All is not as it seems. With these cryptic words, a shocking secret passed down from president to president comes to rest in the hands of Abraham Lincoln.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • The title made the book sound interesting to me

  • By BklynBabe on 06-19-14

Patriotic exploration of our more perfect union

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-22-17

If you could sum up The Lincoln Myth in three words, what would they be?

Fascinating historical journey,

What was one of the most memorable moments of The Lincoln Myth?

The opening presentation of President Abraham Lincoln receiving a disturbing message from his predecessor, James Buchanan.

Have you listened to any of Scott Brick’s other performances before? How does this one compare?

Same excellent quality.

If you could rename The Lincoln Myth, what would you call it?

Our More Perfect Perpetual Union

Any additional comments?

The 1781 Articles of Confederation between the 13 states aimed to establish a perpetual union. But that union proved to be weak and dysfunctional, leading to the 1787 Constitutional Convention which aimed to establish a more perfect union, to quote the Preamble. What the Preamble did not say was a more perfect *perpetual* union. This is the genesis of Mr. Berry's fascinating narrative which revolves around the constitutional legality - or lack thereof - of secession from the Union. This is high-minded, serious stuff, steeped in American history, especially that of the Civil War. Throw in the Mormon Church and its checkered history in this nation and you have the ingredients of a fascinating tale. Now the plot itself, and the characters, yes they are all a bit wooden. But I enjoy the elements of both invention and non-invention in the author's injection of American history into the present. I feel his purpose in presenting such a tale is noble and patriotic, and I really appreciate this, and forgive all the narrative and character flaws. I enjoy his books a lot for the visits to American history, something which those of us who are privileged to live here as citizens should truly cherish. Thanks again, Mr. Berry, for a splendid journey through our present as shaped by our past.

  • The Zimmermann Telegram

  • By: Barbara W. Tuchman
  • Narrated by: Wanda McCaddon
  • Length: 7 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 750
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 629
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 623

In the dark winter of 1917, as World War I was deadlocked, Britain knew that Europe could be saved only if the United States joined the war. But President Wilson remained unshakable in his neutrality. Then, with a single stroke, the tool to propel America into the war came into a quiet British office. One of countless messages intercepted by the crack team of British decoders, the Zimmermann telegram was a top-secret message from Berlin inviting Mexico to join Japan in an invasion of the United States.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Very Interesting

  • By Carolyn on 01-17-13

Hi*story* at its best

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-16-17

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

"The first message of the morning watch plopped out of the pneumatic tube into the wire basket with no more premonitory rattle than usual." This splendid opening sentence, which in my mind rivals those of Ian Fleming, begins our journey into how a "pebble on the long road of history" - this intercepted telegram - "killed the American illusion that we could go about our business happily separate from other nations." The story is the stuff of spy thrillers and its outcome - the entry of the United States into World War I in 1917 - of monumental importance. The author turns great history into a great and compelling story. This book is an incredible achievement.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Admiral Hall, the British Director of Naval Intelligence at the time, is unquestionably the hero of this narrative. He brilliantly masterminded the handling of this intercepted telegram to turn the course of history because without the United States on their side, it is totally possible that Britain and France might have been brought to their knees by the Germans' unrestricted U-boat warfare on merchant shipping - and history would have been altered in a deadly way.

What does Wanda McCaddon bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book?

She brings a voice of authority and reason which makes this great story - a total delight to read between the covers of the book - an equal delight to listen to.

If you were to make a film of this book, what would the tag line be?

Why America matters so much to the free world.

Any additional comments?

Thank you, Audible, for making this recording available.

  • You Belong to Me

  • A Novel
  • By: Colin Harrison
  • Narrated by: Robert Petkoff
  • Length: 12 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 363
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 342
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 340

Paul Reeves is a successful immigration lawyer, but his passion is collecting old maps of New York, tangible records of the city's rich history in an increasingly digital world. One afternoon he attends an auction with his neighbor Jennifer Mehraz, the beautiful young wife of an Iranian financier-lawyer, but halfway through the auction a handsome man in soldier fatigues appears in the aisle and whisks Jennifer away.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • It's a man's book

  • By E. on 07-08-17

An Absorbing New York City Narrative

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-17

What made the experience of listening to You Belong to Me the most enjoyable?

I just happened to read a review of this in the New York Times when I came out and I thought to myself, "That sounds interesting". And it was. It made me really miss New York.

Did the plot keep you on the edge of your seat? How?

I was curious as to how all these threads would be brought together, so i stayed up late listening after I had listened to the book on my way home in the car. When an author does that for me, it is a very pleasing experience.

What about Robert Petkoff’s performance did you like?

Narrator did a nice job but what carried my interest was the story itself.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes.

Any additional comments?

It's great to stumble upon something like this with no warning.

7 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Magpie Murders

  • A Novel
  • By: Anthony Horowitz
  • Narrated by: Samantha Bond, Allan Corduner
  • Length: 15 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,222
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,656
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6,629

When editor Susan Ryeland is given the manuscript of Alan Conway's latest novel, she has no reason to think it will be much different from any of his others. After working with the best-selling crime writer for years, she's intimately familiar with his detective, Atticus Pünd, who solves mysteries disturbing sleepy English villages. An homage to queens of classic British crime such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, Alan's traditional formula has proved hugely successful.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • A British Whodunit

  • By Sara on 07-24-17

Two mysteries for the price of one: Failed concept

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-17

Would you try another book from Anthony Horowitz and/or Samantha Bond and Allan Corduner ?

I have enjoyed Mr. Horowitz's revivals of Sherlock Holmes and James Bond and yes I will definitely continue to follow him despite his failure here.

How would you have changed the story to make it more enjoyable?

Discard the 2015 story of the literary editor playing at detective chasing down the author's killer - it just isn't credible that she would be able to do this. Keep the Christie-like Magpie Murders yarn from 1955 with the rather interesting Atticus Pund. It's a bit forced, but it's still enjoyable.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

Both narrators did a fine job. One had good material to work with, and the other didn't.

Did Magpie Murders inspire you to do anything?

Revisit Agatha Christie.

Any additional comments?

The 2015 narrative seemed to have forgotten all about modern police and detection methods and technologies, which I thought was ridiculous. There is no way the police would have been so casual in not looking into the suspicious death of a wealthy and successful writer. There is no way a total amateur like Susan Rylande could have figured things out. Her narrative is a failure, and hence the book itself is a failure. Just let the Pund story stand on its own, and you would have a perfectly delightful English mystery. In fact, Mr. Horowitz might want to try his hand at creating the preceding 8 Atticus Pund mysteries, they might be a real pleasure.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Seveneves

  • A Novel
  • By: Neal Stephenson
  • Narrated by: Mary Robinette Kowal, Will Damron
  • Length: 31 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 17,304
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 16,075
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 16,069

A catastrophic event renders the earth a ticking time bomb. In a feverish race against the inevitable, nations around the globe band together to devise an ambitious plan to ensure the survival of humanity far beyond our atmosphere, in outer space.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • So Much Potential

  • By Kurt Schwoppe on 06-08-17

Not credible story with a boring sequel within too

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-27-17

No way these robotic characters and their tedious descendants would survive this mass extinction event.