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Cheryl

Savannah, GA, United States
  • 6
  • reviews
  • 35
  • helpful votes
  • 12
  • ratings
  • Where the Crawdads Sing

  • By: Delia Owens
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 12 hrs and 12 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 36,858
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,677
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,546

For years, rumors of the "Marsh Girl" have haunted Barkley Cove, a quiet town on the North Carolina coast. So in late 1969, when handsome Chase Andrews is found dead, the locals immediately suspect Kya Clark, the so-called Marsh Girl. But Kya is not what they say. Sensitive and intelligent, she has survived for years alone in the marsh that she calls home, finding friends in the gulls and lessons in the sand. Then the time comes when she yearns to be touched and loved. When two young men from town become intrigued by her wild beauty, Kya opens herself to a new life - until the unthinkable happens.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful

  • By Seattle blues on 08-17-18

Ridiculous plot, author needs a map of her locale

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-04-19

Everyone in a child's large family moves out and leaves her alone in a cabin in the woods, even though many of them live nearby. Child protective services don't bother with her either after a brief encounter in which she is recalcitrant. She just is the weird kid who lives in the swamp and provides all of her own food and clothing. Of course she grows up into a beauty with intelligence beyond that of the rest of humankind despite the fact that she has had no formal education. Oh and she lives on the coast of NC buts goes to Asheville, 5 or 6 hours away to shop at Sears. Totally implausible.

If you would like to read a similar story that makes sense in its own twisted way because it is a true memoir, read Educated.
Fabulous page turner!

  • Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • A Novel
  • By: Gail Honeyman
  • Narrated by: Cathleen McCarron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 31,061
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 28,761
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 28,655

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she's thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Close To Perfection--A Definite Thumbs Up!

  • By Kathy on 08-07-17

Great read! Astute snapshot of character and culture

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-13-18

Although some might find the detail with which the author describes her protagonist’s life extreme, I found it fascinating. Honeyman uses the outsider, Eleanor, to provide amusing and astute commentary on today’s post-pubic hair, Twitter culture. I did not want to read the book after reading reviews that called it depressing. As compared to actually depressing books, such as Lie Down in Darkness or the Doll Maker, book is very uplifting. But like those literary classics, Eleanor Oliphant is well written with acute descriptions of culture and excellent character development. Audio reading was excellent, also.

  • A God in Ruins

  • A Novel
  • By: Kate Atkinson
  • Narrated by: Alex Jennings
  • Length: 16 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,809
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,652
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,649

A God in Ruins tells the dramatic story of the 20th century through Ursula's beloved younger brother, Teddy - would-be poet, heroic pilot, husband, father, and grandfather - as he navigates the perils and progress of a rapidly changing world. After all that Teddy endures in battle, his greatest challenge is living in a future he never expected to have.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • FRUSTRATING BUT GOOD

  • By Janna Wong Healy on 10-27-15

Great author but Not this author's best

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-25-17

We all loved Life After Life in my book group. Several of the members suggested Atkinson's mysteries. I listened to Case Histories by her. It was fantastic. This one however was not interesting. None of the characters were likable.

  • Homegoing

  • A Novel
  • By: Yaa Gyasi
  • Narrated by: Dominic Hoffman
  • Length: 13 hrs and 11 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,922
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,468
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,478

Two half sisters, Effia and Esi, unknown to each other, are born into different villages in 18th-century Ghana. Effia is married off to an Englishman and will live in comfort in the palatial rooms of Cape Coast Castle, raising children who will be sent abroad to be educated before returning to the Gold Coast to serve as administrators of the empire. Esi, imprisoned beneath Effia in the castle's women's dungeon and then shipped off on a boat bound for America, will be sold into slavery.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • An important story but terribly disjointed

  • By Joy on 12-07-17

Disappointing after all the hype

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-26-16

I really wanted to like this book. Expecting a literary novel, it delivered a disjointed collection of short stories. The character development seemed to wear thin very early in the book. The motivation of most of the characters was unclear. The reader was not able to affect female voices so it was often hard to determine who was speaking until the sentences unfolded to include "she said." He also would lapse into an annoying cadence at times that was distracting from the stories. I recently read Gysai's op-ed in the New York Times and saw the strength of her writing. Although Homegoing was not all that I expected, I look forward to this author's future works.

26 of 37 people found this review helpful

  • A Confederacy of Dunces

  • By: John Kennedy Toole
  • Narrated by: Barrett Whitener
  • Length: 13 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 5,570
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,286
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 4,293

The hero of John Kennedy Toole's incomparable, Pulitzer Prize-winning comic classic is one Ignatius J. Reilly, "huge, obese, fractious, fastidious, a latter-day Gargantua, a Don Quixote of the French Quarter". His story bursts with wholly original characters, denizens of New Orleans' lower depths, incredibly true-to-life dialogue, and the zaniest series of high and low comic adventures.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well Done

  • By Jon on 09-18-05

Excellent editon takes audio books to new art form

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-09-13

Partner one of the best books, comedic or otherwise, ever written with stellar narration and you have the most entertaining audiobooks I have ever heard. The book has always been one of my favorites; this is the fourth time I have read it. This audio edition rivals my first reading due to the engaging reading. Pure joy!

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • The White Tiger

  • A Novel
  • By: Aravind Adiga
  • Narrated by: John Lee
  • Length: 8 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 2,871
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,616
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,613

Balram Halwai is a complicated man. Servant. Philosopher. Entrepreneur. Murderer. Balram tells us the terrible and transfixing story of how he came to be a success in life - having nothing but his own wits to help him along. Through Balram's eyes, we see India as we've never seen it before: the cockroaches and the call centers, the prostitutes and the worshippers, the water buffalo and, trapped in so many kinds of cages that escape is (almost) impossible, the white tiger.

With a charisma as undeniable as it is unexpected, Balram teaches us that religion doesn't create morality and money doesn't solve every problem.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Great, informative tale

  • By Barry Feinstein on 05-19-09

Exotic & engaging

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-10-11

A fascinating read. Also, gives one insight into the problems in India that are reported in the media.