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N. Dandridge

  • 15
  • reviews
  • 19
  • helpful votes
  • 78
  • ratings
  • I Know This Much Is True

  • By: Wally Lamb
  • Narrated by: Ken Howard
  • Length: 6 hrs
  • Abridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 700
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 532
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 530

In the long awaited follow-up to the highly praised novel She's Come Undone, Dominick Birdsey must come to terms with himself, as well as with the schizophrenic twin brother he has spent his life both protecting and resenting.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Disappointing

  • By Douglas on 03-20-08

Ugh - didn't see this was abridged!

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-14-19

Why oh why isn't there an unabridged version of this book? Wally Lamb is such a good author.

  • Framley Parsonage

  • By: Anthony Trollope
  • Narrated by: Simon Vance
  • Length: 18 hrs and 48 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 152
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 77
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80

Mark Robarts, a young vicar, is newly arrived in the village of Framley. With ambitions to further his career, he seeks connections in the county's high society. He is soon preyed upon by a local member of parliament to guarantee a substantial loan, which Mark, in a moment of weakness, agrees to, even though he knows the man is a notorious debtor; it brings Mark to the brink of ruin.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Doesn't disappoint

  • By Herv J. Peairs on 06-27-07

My first Anthony Trollope book

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-19

A few decades ago, when I was in my 20s I decided to try reading a classic novel for pleasure (as opposed for a school assignment). My first go at this was A Woman in White by Wilkie Collins. I loved it and from that point forward I have tried to read a few classic (mostly British) novels every year. One of the things I especially loved about A Women in White was its portrayal of strong and intelligent women despite it being written in 1859 by a man. It made me realize that feminism was alive and well even back then and that (some) men recognized that women had more value than simply as housekeepers and baby makers. Framley Parsonage falls into that same category. While the plot is not nearly as riveting as Mr. Collins' book, it does, nonetheless have several smart, powerful, and independent women in it. In fact, I might say that this book is about how women are really the ones that get things done - and not just housework.
My favorite character, by far, is Miss Dunstable. She is not beautiful or young but she's funny, smart and wealthy and its very fun to listen in on her snarky conversations with people.
The book is about the folly of young men, the independence of women, the danger of debt, and the politics of Britain. And for you romantics, there's a few romances thrown in the mix. The first chapter or two are a bit hard to digest and I worried I wouldn't be able to get into the book. But you can more or less skim these chapters and not miss anything too important. They are mostly about introducing the various players and locales so you can always go back to them if needed.
A note about the narrator: Simon Vance. I have listened to several of his narratives (mostly Dickens) and he never fails to disappoint. He makes the wordy 19th century English so much more understandable and enjoyable. If you're hesitant to start reading any of these British classics, start one by listening and pick one narrated by the talented Mr. Vance.

  • Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine

  • A Novel
  • By: Gail Honeyman
  • Narrated by: Cathleen McCarron
  • Length: 11 hrs and 2 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 33,011
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 30,544
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30,429

Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she's thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy. But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Close To Perfection--A Definite Thumbs Up!

  • By Kindle Customer on 08-07-17

Excellent book; excellent narration

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-23-18

Several friends have recommended this book to me so I managed to squeak it in between book club assignments. What a treat. While the book is somewhat formulaic, the author puts a twist on our hero Eleanor as she overcomes some pretty major traumatic memories and learns to trust humankind. The book is part funny, part sad, and part feel-good. Cathleen McCarron did an excellent job with the narration especially with Eleanor and Raymond's voice. She added a great deal of enjoyment to the experience and I intend to look up other books she has worked on.

1 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Whistling Past the Graveyard

  • By: Susan Crandall
  • Narrated by: Amy Rubinate
  • Length: 11 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,947
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,662
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,651

In the summer of 1963, nine-year-old spitfire Starla Claudelle runs away from her strict grandmother's Mississippi home. Starla hasn't seen her momma since she was three - that's when Lulu left for Nashville to become a famous singer. If she can get to Nashville and find her momma, then all that she promised will come true: Lulu will be a star. Daddy will come to live in Nashville, too. And her family will be whole and perfect.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Feisty red-headed little girl takes on the south

  • By Laurette on 07-16-14

Fast pace with drama at nearly every turn

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

The book is written 100% from the eyes of a 9 year old in the deep south at the dawning of the civil rights movement. Feeling unloved and having been threatened to be shipped off to reform school, Starla sets off to Nashville to find her famous mother who left when Starla was 3. She faces several near death experiences and meets some interesting people along the way. It's a solidly enjoyable book to read. The writing is fine as is the narration. It gets a bit sappy at the end but it was well worth the time.

  • Around the World in 80 Days

  • By: Jules Verne
  • Narrated by: Alan Munro
  • Length: 7 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 218
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 201
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202

Phileas Fogg of London and his newly employed French valet Passepartout attempt to circumnavigate the world in 80 days on a £20,000 wager set by his friends at the Reform Club. Around the World in 80 Days is one of Jules Verne's most acclaimed works.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • narration is BAD

  • By Akela on 10-30-15

There are no hot air balloons!

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-28-18

I was amazed to find that Jules Verne does NOT include hot air balloons in this book! How did that trend get started? At any rate, the book is not well written - this may have been due to the translation. I've read Mysterious Island and didn't remember the writing being all that bad. The narrator of this particular version (Alan Munro) is not good. I'm sure there are better narrators so try a different one. Mr. Munro drove me crazy and I almost forked out the money to buy an alternative version.

  • Silas Marner

  • By: George Eliot
  • Narrated by: Donna Barkman
  • Length: 7 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 19
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 16
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 15

In this humorous, richly symbolic, meticulously plotted novel, a solitary and simple-hearted weaver has worked his loom in Raveloe and devoted himself to amassing a hoard of golden guineas. However his life is changed forever when tragedy intervenes and he finds himself responsible for the care of a small golden-haired girl.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Story is great; narration is bad

  • By N. Dandridge on 07-04-18

Story is great; narration is bad

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-18

If you're picky about the narration as I am, DON'T buy this audio version. There are better ones. The sound quality is poor and the reader is flat. DO read this book, but just not this audio version.

  • Silas Marner

  • By: George Eliot
  • Narrated by: Anna Bentinck
  • Length: 8 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 90
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84

Here is a tale straight from the fireside. We are compelled to follow the humble and mysterious figure of the linen weaver Silas Marner, on his journey from solitude and exile to the warmth and joy of family life. His path is a strange one; when he loses his hoard of hard-earned coins all seems to be lost, but in place of the golden guineas come the golden curls of a child - and from desolate misery comes triumphant joy.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Too busy to read Middlemarch?

  • By N. Dandridge on 07-04-18

Too busy to read Middlemarch?

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-04-18

George Eliot wrote Silas Marner a decade before she undertook Middlemarch. There are several themes in SM that are also used in Middlemarch - religious fanaticism, gambling problems, horse trading, village life. But SM is definitely easier to digest if you want a taste of George Eliot (Mary Ann Evans) without a huge commitment. I love her descriptions of friendship and family. She takes a deep dive into what family really means - is blood really thicker than water? I grew to love our hero in the story - Silas - in spite of his awkwardness and austistic tendencies.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Sophia of Silicon Valley

  • A Novel
  • By: Anna Yen
  • Narrated by: Emily Woo Zeller
  • Length: 10 hrs and 59 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 70
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 68

During the heady years of the tech boom, incorrigibly frank Sophia Young lucks into a job that puts her directly in the path of Scott Kraft, the eccentric CEO of Treehouse, a studio whose animated films are transforming movies forever. Overnight, Sophia becomes an unlikely nerd whisperer. Whether her success is due to dumb luck, savage assertiveness, insightful finesse (learned by dealing with her irrational Chinese immigrant mother), or a combination of all three, in her rarified position she finds she can truly shine.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I loved this book!

  • By Wayne and Margie on 04-18-18

Too close to home?

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-07-18

I was excited to read this book - I worked (indirectly) for Elon Musk for 8 years so I felt a kinship. But I found I didn't like her writing, didn't like her amazement with herself, and didn't like the story. I admit that much of what she writes about Andre Stark (the Elon character) ran very true based on my experience but I grew tired of her self-assessed skill at being able to "handle" these difficult powerful men. My biggest gripe was her inability to get along with the Ion CFO. My gawd - she had a scheduled phone interview with him and she blew him off TWICE and wonders why he doesn't like her in their first in-person interview. And yet she never seems to take any blame herself.
The author's career is impressive and I'm sure she'd be a fun person to talk to; but she should probably stick to working with startups and VCs and leave fiction writing to those who are better trained.
I finished this book because it was a book club selection - but it wasn't easy.

  • Big Little Lies

  • By: Liane Moriarty
  • Narrated by: Caroline Lee
  • Length: 15 hrs and 55 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 45,256
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,676
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 40,597

Pirriwee Public's annual school Trivia Night has ended in a shocking riot. One parent is dead. The school principal is horrified. As police investigate what appears to have been a tragic accident, signs begin to indicate that this devastating death might have been cold-blooded murder. In this thought-provoking novel, number-one New York Times best-selling author Liane Moriarty deftly explores the reality of parenting and playground politics, ex-husbands and ex-wives, and fractured families.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Oh, Calamity!

  • By L. O. Pardue on 10-07-14

Very fun read; writing is fine but not great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-30-17

This was a tough book to put down. I was definitely engaged throughout. But if you’re looking for great literature - go somewhere else. Fun read with a lot going on and good suspense. I have not yet seen the TV series but am looking forward to it. I found the narration a bit abrasive but overall it’s a good book.

  • The Remains of the Day

  • By: Kazuo Ishiguro
  • Narrated by: Simon Prebble
  • Length: 8 hrs and 8 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,728
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,394
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,378

The Remains of the Day is a profoundly compelling portrait of the perfect English butler and of his fading, insular world in postwar England. At the end of his three decades of service at Darlington Hall, Stevens embarks on a country drive, during which he looks back over his career to reassure himself that he has served humanity by serving "a great gentleman". But lurking in his memory are doubts about the true nature of Lord Darlington's "greatness" and graver doubts about his own faith in the man he served.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An excellent audio book performance

  • By Julie Leto on 08-03-14

Reflections of an English Butler

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-16-17

If you enjoy character development and the evolving of a person along with excellent prose, this book is for you. If you are more interested in sci-fi try Never Let Me Go by same author. Stevens is the emotionally challenged and aging butler that places dignity above all else. At least his definition of dignity. His reflections take place over the course of a 6 day solo road trip. His reflections fall back to his previous employer who was involved in questionable activities and the Housekeeper during the same timeframe. The last few pages sums it all up beautifully.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful